Re-tabulate

Right after I wrote about combining flexbox with responsive design—to switch the display of content and navigation based on browser size—I received an email from Raphaël Goetter. He pointed out a really elegant solution to the same use-case that makes use of display:table.

Let’s take the same markup as before:

<body>
<div role="main">
<p>This is the main content.</p>
</div>
<nav role="navigation">
<p>This is the navigation.</p>
<ol>
<li><a href="#">foo</a></li>
<li><a href="#">bar</a></li>
<li><a href="#">baz</a></li>
</ol>
</nav>
</body>

The source order reflects the order I want on small-screen devices (feature phones, smart phones, etc.). Once the viewport allows it, I’d like to put that navigation at the top. I can do this by wrapping some display declarations in a media query:

@media screen and (min-width: 30em) {
    body {
        display: table;
        caption-side: top;
    }
    [role="navigation"] {
        display: table-caption;
    }
}

That’s it. It works much like box-orient:vertical with box-direction:reverse but because this is good ol’ CSS 2.1, it’s very well supported.

We can solve the other issue too: making those list items display horizontally on larger screens:

[role="navigation"] ol {
    display: table-row;
}
[role="navigation"] ol li {
    display: table-cell;
}

Once again, I’ve put a gist up on Github (get me! I’m like a proper computer nerd).

Update: And Remy has put it on JSbin so you can see it in action (resize the live preview pane).

So there you go: we’ve at least two different mechanisms in CSS to re-order the display of content and navigation in response to screen real-estate. The default is content first, navigation second—a pattern that Luke talked about in this interview with Jared:

Yeah, one of the design principles that I’ll be talking on the tour about, for mobile, is content first, navigation second; which is just really putting something up right away that somebody can engage with, and saving the pivoting and the navigating for later.

There’s, basically, UI patterns that you can use to make that happen. I’m still surprised at how many, both mobile websites and applications, the first thing they give you is a menu of choices, instead of content.

Don’t get me wrong, the menu’s important, and you can get to it, but it’s actually the content that the immediacy of mobile, and the fact that you’re probably on a slower network, and in some cases you’re even paying for your data transfers, right? Giving you a list of choices as your first time experience tends not to work so well.

Luke Wroblewski — Designing Mobile Web Experiences » UIE Brain Sparks on Huffduffer

Have you published a response to this? :