Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

Google Web Fonts Typographic Project

Google Fonts aren’t renowned for their quality but this is a beautiful demonstration of what you can accomplish with them.

Nicole Fenton | Interface Writing: Code for Humans

The text of Nicole’s excellent talk on writing helpful, human microcopy.

The ethics of digital design | Design Council

This piece by Cennydd on ethics in digital design reminded me of something Jonathan Harris wrote a while back.

I like that he cautions against hiding the seams:

Designers should also strive to give digital products a healthy balance of seamlessness and interrogability. While it’s appealing to create technology that needs little human intervention, this sort of black box can be a breeding ground for dishonest behaviour.

Monday, July 13th, 2015

Edge Conference 2015 - 5 Progressive Enhancement - YouTube

Here’s the video of the panel I participated in at Edge conference, expertly moderated by Lyza.

Thanks to the video editing, you can’t see the face I’m making when the guy from Facebook talks about user-agent sniffing as a totally cool and reliable way of working.

Thursday, July 9th, 2015

Blinking Fever - Tantek

A heartbreaking tale of companionship, memory and loss.

Designing with Progressive Enhancement — sixtwothree.org

The full text of Jason’s great talk at this year’s CSS Summit. It’s a great read, clearing up many of the misunderstandings around progressive enhancement and showing some practical examples of progressive enhancement working at each level of the web’s technology stack

An album for a11y | HeydonWorks

Heydon’s putting together a collection of songs from webby people. I need to either give him a Salter Cane track or record some tunes for this.

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015

OpenGeofiction

OpenGeofiction is a map of an imaginary world, created by a community of worldbuilders. You can take part in this project too.

Sunday, July 5th, 2015

The Internet That Was (and Still Could Be) - The Atlantic

A fantastic piece by David Weinberger on the changing uses of the internet—apparently in contradiction of the internet’s original architecture.

Some folks invented the Internet for some set of purposes. They gave it a name, pointed to some prototypical examples—sharing scientific papers and engaging in email about them—shaping the way the early adopters domesticated it.

But over time, the Internet escaped from its creators’ intentions. It became a way to communicate person-to-person via email and many-to-many via Usenet. The web came along and the prototypical example became home pages. Social networking came along and the prototype became Facebook.

Domain Stories | Citizen Ex

The fascinating tales behind Top Level Domains as part of James and Nat’s Citizen Ex project. So far there’s .scot, .cymru, and .ly, with more to come.

adactio.com on Huffduffer

I recorded audio versions of some of my favourite blog posts.

Saturday, July 4th, 2015

Jeremy Keith wrote 100 words for 100 days - Colin Devroe

I’m quite touched by this—I had no idea anyone was paying that much attention to my 100 words project.

Friday, July 3rd, 2015

Contextual Styling: UI Components, Nesting, and Implementation Detail by Harry Roberts

Smart thinking from Harry here on a common issue when it comes to naming and styling. As he points out, the solution is not technical, but lies in how you form your mental model:

The design issue here is solved by subtly inverting the problem.

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015

tota11y – an a11y visualization toolkit

A handy little bookmarklet for doing some quick accessibility checks.

Report: Responsive Day Out 3 - JH

This is a lovely report not just on the most recent Responsive Day Out, but on all three years:

The final outing delivered a diverse range of topics to reveal the state of responsive web design in 2015 and complete a hat-trick of superb conferences.

Tuesday, June 30th, 2015

It’s time to progress

Many believe we should leave the term “progressive enhancement” behind and start anew, but why not educate developers, clients and stakeholders and change many of the misconceptions surrounding it? Changing the name won’t change anything unless we address the real fundamental problems we have when describing the underlying concepts.

Why availability matters

A superb illustration of why playing the numbers game and dismissing even a small percentage of your potential audience could be disastrous.

It’s not 1% of people who always can’t see your site and 99% of people who always can. It’s 1% of visits. Almost all the people who don’t get your site correctly actually should have been able to. They don’t have JavaScript turned off. They’re not browsing on a WAP phone over a 2g connection from a shanty town. They’re you, in a cellar bar or a hotel room or waiting for the phone network to wake back up.

Thriving in Unpredictability - TimKadlec.com

This is the way to approach building for the web:

I want to make as few of those assumptions as possible. Because every assumption I make introduces fragility. Every assumption introduces another way that my site can break.

It’s progressive enhancement, but like Stuart, Tim is no longer planning to use that term.

Sunday, June 28th, 2015

as days pass by — Availability

Stuart writes up his thoughts on progressive enhancement following the great discussions at Edge Conf:

So I’m not going to be talking about progressive enhancement any more. I’m going to be talking about availability. About reach. About my web apps being for everyone even when the universe tries to stop it.

Saturday, June 27th, 2015

Before Sunrise :: Responsive Day Out

Another great in-depth round-up of the third and final Responsive Day Out, this time from Katja Durrani.