Tags: a

Axiomatic CSS and Lobotomized Owls · An A List Apart Article

I’m quite intrigued by the thinking behind this CSS selector of Heydon’s.

* + * {
    margin-top: 1.5em;
}

I should try it out and see how it feels.

Carrot

It Just Works.®™

Baby Steps - Petra Gregorová

Petra has always been the strong one. She was the best friend that Chloe could have possibly had. Little wonder then that Chloe’s death continues to hit her so hard.

I still can’t fully comprehend it all nor do I have any idea how to learn to move on. All I know is that ever since the day I found out, I’ve been on an emotional rollercoaster. I go from being in shock, to being sad and angry, or completely numb.

Petra is getting help now. That’s good. She’s also writing about what she has been going through. That’s brave. Very brave.

She is one of the best human beings I know.

What is still on the web after 10 years of archiving? - UK Web Archive blog

The short answer: not much.

The UK Web Archive at The British Library outlines its process for determining just how bad the linkrot is after just one decade.

Replacing Radio Buttons Without Replacing Radio Buttons

A great technique from Heydon for styling radio buttons however you want.

Patty Toland — Design Consistency For The Responsive Web (Smashing Conference Freiburg 2014) on Vimeo

Patty’s excellent talk on responsive design and progressive enhancement. Stick around for question-and-answer session at the end, wherein I attempt to play hardball, but actually can’t conceal my admiration and the fact that I agree with every single word she said.

Petition · WHO: End the suffering of the Ebola crisis. Test and distribute homeopathy as quickly as possible to contain the outbreaks. · Change.org

Over 3,000 idiots and counting.

This is the intersection of Hanlon’s Razor with Clarke’s third law: any sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice.

This would be funny if it weren’t, in a very literal sense, evil.

The Elon Musk interview on Mars colonisation – Ross Andersen – Aeon

Elon Musk talks engineering, the Fermi paradox, and getting your ass to Mars.

as days pass by — The next big thing is privacy

Stuart has written some wise words about making privacy the differentiator that can take on Facebook and Google.

He also talks about Aral’s ind.ie project; all the things they’re doing right, and all things they could do better:

The ind.ie project is to open source as Brewdog are to CAMRA.

Solved By Flexbox — Cleaner, hack-free CSS

Documenting common layout issues that can be solved with Flexbox. I like the fact that some of these can be used as enhancements e.g. sticky footer, input add-ons …the fallback in older browsers is perfectly acceptable.

ysltf on Huffduffer

Sam Greenspan from the brilliant 99% Invisible podcast has created a Huffduffer feed based on his “You Should Listen To Friday” Tumblr blog.

If you have a Huffduffer account, add this to your collective.

And definitely subscribe to this RSS feed in your podcast app of choice.

Ariel Waldman Talks About Science Hack Day: Triangulation 120 - YouTube

This is a great summation of the origins of Science Hack Day from Ariel.

Science Hack Day San Francisco 2014 Demos - YouTube

All the marvellous hacks from Science Hack Day San Francisco being demoed at the end of the event.

Mine is the first one up, five minutes in.

The boring front-end developer - Adam Silver, Front end developer, based in London

My name is Jeremy and I am a boring front-end developer.

Why I Joined the IndieWeb Movement - Wingin’ It

I hope that many of you will watch me on this journey, and follow in my wagon tracks as I leave the walled cities and strike out for the wilderness ahead.

Startups and Shit, HTML-first

The Android vs. iOS debate is one hinges around whether you think it makes more sense to target a (perceived) larger market, or target one that the technorati favor. But why choose? Building a good responsive web app has a series of benefits, the primary one being that you target users on every platform with one app. Every user. Every platform. All the time. Release whenever you want. A/B test with ease. Go, go go.

Science Hack Day San Francisco 2014 Teams - an album on Flickr

What a fantastic collection of creators!

Jerry Seinfeld’s Clio Acceptance Speech - YouTube

I feel that this is relevant to that discussion I had with Malarkey on his podcast about advertising.

How did Twitter become the hate speech wing of the free speech party?

A look back at how Twitter evolved over time, with examples of seemingly-trivial changes altering the nature of the discourse.

Kevin finishes with a timely warning for those of us building alternatives:

In the indieweb world we are just starting to connect sites together with webmentions, and we need to consider this history as we do.

Progressive Enhancement Basics

Some thoughts on progressive enhancement, although I disagree with the characterisation of progressive enhancement as being the opposite choice to making “something flashy that pushes the web to it’s limits”—it’s entirely possible to make the flashiest, limit-pushing sites using progressive enhancement. After all…

it’s much more a mindset than a particular development technique.

LHC Map

A lovely hack from Science Hack Day San Francisco: get an idea of the size of CERN’s Large Hadron Collider by seeing it superimposed over your town.

Science Hack Day: Serious Fun in the Making

It’s impossible to predict the creations that will spring forth when people gather in the spirit of participation, collaboration, and benign anarchy at the next Science Hack Day, but the results are certain to be inspired, and inspiring.

Blogging Known Style

Companies go out of business, get bought and change policies, so what if you had one place to originate all of your content then publish it out to those great social services? And hey, why not pull comments from those services back to your original post?

That’s the idea behind Indie Web Camp: have your own website be the canonical source of what your publish. But right now, getting all of the moving parts up and running requires a fair dollop of tech-savviness. That’s where Known comes in:

It’s similar to the WordPress model: you can create a blog on their servers, or you can download the software and host it on your own.

This post is a good run-down of what’s working well with Known, and what needs more work.

The Hummingbird Effect — How We Got to Now

How the printing press led to the microscope, and chlorination transformed women’s fashion—Steven Johnson channels James Burke.

Tabletop Whale

Beautiful visualisations of science and nature.

Made with love by a designer with a molecular biology degree.

ntlk’s blog: Why can’t you track periods in Apple’s Health app?

Good question.

JS Parse and Execution Time - TimKadlec.com

Tim’s been running the numbers on how long it takes various browsers on various devices to parse JavaScript—in this case, jQuery. The time varies enormously depending on the device hardware.

How We Could Actually Build a Space Colony - Popular Mechanics

This is basically porn for me.

Bernal spheres, Stanford tori, and O’Neill cylinders, oh my!

Physical Web by google

This is what Scott Jenson has been working on—a first stab at just-in-time interactions by having physical devices broadcasting URLs.

Walk up and use anything

OS X bash Update 1.0 – OS X Mavericks

Incredibly, you have to manually download and run this patch for Shellshock on OS X: it’s not being pushed as a security update.

But the new U2 album? That’s being pushed to everyone.

Y Combinator and the negative externalities of Hacker News | Danilo Campos

When I wrote about Reddit and Hacker News, criticising their lack of moderation, civility, and basic decency, many people (invariably men) responded in defence of Reddit. Nobody defended Hacker News. Nobody.

Oh, and all of you people (men) defending Reddit? Here’s your party line …I find it abhorrent.

Introducing Universal SSL

Great news from Cloudflare—https endpoints by default!

This means that if you’re planning on switching on TLS for your site, but you’re using Cloudflare as a CDN, you’ve got one less thing to change (and goodness knows you’re going to have enough to do already).

I really like their reasoning for doing this, despite the fact that it might mean that they take a financial hit:

Having cutting-edge encryption may not seem important to a small blog, but it is critical to advancing the encrypted-by-default future of the Internet. Every byte, however seemingly mundane, that flows encrypted across the Internet makes it more difficult for those who wish to intercept, throttle, or censor the web. In other words, ensuring your personal blog is available over HTTPS makes it more likely that a human rights organization or social media service or independent journalist will be accessible around the world. Together we can do great things.

Keep ’em Separated — ericportis.com

I share the concerns expressed here about the “sizes” attribute that’s part of the new turbo-powered img element (or “the picture element and its associates”, if you prefer). Putting style or layout information into HTML smells bad.

This is a concern that Matt Wilcox has raised:

Change the design and those breakpoints are likely to be wrong. So you’ll need to change all of the client-side mark-up that references images.

I can give you a current use-case: right here on adactio.com, you can change the stylesheet …so I can’t embed breakpoints or sizes into my img elements because—quite rightly—there’s a separation between the structural HTML layer and the presentational CSS layer.

Responsive Images: If you’re just changing resolutions, use srcset. | CSS-Tricks

Following on from that post of Jason’s I linked to, Chris also emphasises that, for most use cases, you probably only need to use srcset (and maybe sizes), but not the picture element with explicit sources.

It’s really, really great that people are writing about this, because it can be quite a confusing topic to wrap your head around at first.

15 Lessons from 15 Years of Blogging - Anil Dash

I’d go along with pretty much everything Anil says here. Wise words from someone who’s been writing on their own website for fifteen years (congratulations!).

Link to everything you create elsewhere on the web. And if possible, save a copy of it on your own blog. Things disappear so quickly, and even important work can slip your mind months or years later when you want to recall it. If it’s in one, definitive place, you’ll be glad for it.

Lillian Karabaic: The Indie Web is the new Zines

I really like this comparison:

As a zinester and zine librarian, I see the Indie Web as a pretty direct correlation to 1980’s and 1990’s zine culture. The method of production may be completely different (photocopiers and direct mail vs web posts and servers) but the goals are almost identical – controlling the way in which your message and identity are displayed, crafted, and stored while avoiding censorship that corporate media might impose. The end goal of both zine and indieweb technologies is ownership of your own identity without a filter.

But there also challenges:

The key issue right now for diverse populations utilizing the Indie Web is accessibility. As long as the tools for creating & controlling your own identity online are still relatively obtuse & technical to implement, we won’t have great diversity within the Indie Web.

Using ServiceWorker in Chrome today - JakeArchibald.com

It’s very early days for ServiceWorker, but Jake is on hand with documentation and instructions on its use. To be honest, most of this is over my head and I suspect it won’t really “click” until I try using it for myself.

Where it gets really interesting is in the comments. Stuart asks “What about progressive enhancement?” And Jake points out that because a ServiceWorker won’t be installed on a first visit, you pretty much have to treat it as an enhancement. In fact, you’d have to go out of your way to make it a requirement:

You could, of course, throw up a splash screen and wait for the ServiceWorker to install, creating a ServiceWorker-dependant experience. I will hunt those people down.

The Tink Tank » Understanding screen reader interaction modes

Léonie gives a great, clear description of how screen readers switch modes as they traverse the DOM snapshot.

» Don’t use <picture> (most of the time) Cloud Four Blog

Jason points out that the picture element might not be needed for most responsive image use cases; the srcset and sizes attributes will probably be enough—that’s what I’m doing for the photos on my site.

[this is aaronland] upload.js

A really handy bit of code from Aaron for building a robust file uploader. A way to make your web-based photo sharing more Instagrammy-clever.

Anne’s Blog

Anne is documenting his process of going https:

  1. TLS: first steps
  2. TLS: issues with StartSSL
  3. TLS: issues with DreamHost
  4. TLS: deploy HSTS
  5. TLS: next steps

I’m really glad he’s doing this.

Perennial Design, by Wilson Miner · Issue 4 · The Manual

A deeply thoughtful piece (as always) by Wilson, on the mindset needed for a sustainable way of working.

When we start with the assumption that optimizing for rapid, unbounded growth is a goal, we immediately narrow the possibility space. There are only so many choices we can make that will get us there. The same choices that made annual monoculture and the shopping mall the most efficient engines for short-term growth and profit are the same qualities that made them unsustainable in the long term.

There are more ways to scale than growth. There are more ways to deepen our impact than just reaching more people. What if we put just as much effort into scaling the impact of our work over time? Can we build digital products around sustainable systems that survive long enough to outlive us, that are purpose-built to thrive without our constant cultivation?

Against Sharing | Jacobin

But under the guise of innovation and progress, companies are stripping away worker protections, pushing down wages, and flouting government regulations. At its core, the sharing economy is a scheme to shift risk from companies to workers, discourage labor organizing, and ensure that capitalists can reap huge profits with low fixed costs.

There’s nothing innovative or new about this business model. Uber is just capitalism, in its most naked form.

A Fundamental Disconnect, From the Notebook of Aaron Gustafson

I think Aaron is spot-on here. There’s a tendency to treat web development these days as just the same as any other kind of software development—which is, on the one hand, great because it shows just how far JavaScript and browsers have come …but on the other hand, that attitude is missing a crucial understanding of the fundamental nature of the web’s technology stack (that we should be treating HTML, CSS, and JavaScript as layers; not as one big ball of webby, timey-wimey stuff).

Extensible Web Summit Berlin 2014: my lightning talk on Web Components | soledad penadés

Soledad Penadés also went to the Extensible Web Summit in Berlin, where she gave a lightning talk. Sounds like it was really good.

This also includes some good advice that, again, Alex might want to consider before denouncing any disagreement on Web Components as “piffle and tosh”:

If the W3C, or any other standardisation organisation wants to attract “normal” developers to get more diverse inputs, they/we should start by being respectful to everyone. Don’t try to show everyone how superclever you are. Don’t be a jerk. Don’t scare people away, because then only the loud ones stay, and the quieter shy people, or people who have more urgent matters to attend (such as, you know, having a working business website even if it’s not using the latest and greatest API) will just leave.

Bruce Lawson’s personal site  : Reflections on Extensible Web Summit, Berlin

Bruce went to the Extensible Web Summit in Berlin and wrote up his notes.

Sounds like he shares my excitement, but also my nervousness.

I’m not yet entirely convinced that we’re not heralding a new era of JavaScript-only web development. I don’t want to see the fossilisation of the declarative web and a new Programmer Priesthood (re-)emerge.

There’s also this important point, that Alex would do well to remember before crying “Piffle and tosh!”:

We need to ensure that all devs who want to can participate by allowing ease of collaboration, courteous discourse.

The Scourge of Helvetica Neue Light | Clagnut

Richard never rants.

Here’s Richard ranting.

Hypertext as an agent of change | A Working Library

The text of Mandy’s astounding dConstruct talk.

Marvellous stuff!

Notes on notes (of smart people) about web components

Steve Faulkner responds to Alex’s response to my post about Web Components.

Steve shares my concerns …but he still refers to my post as “piffle”.

I can’t win.

Why You Want a Code of Conduct & How We Made One | Incisive.nu

A great piece by Erin on the value of a code of conduct for conferences, filled with practical advice.

Once you decide to create a code and do it thoughtfully, you’ll find the internet overflows with resources to help you accomplish your goals, and good people who’ll offer guidance and advice. From my own experience, I can say that specificity and follow-through will make your code practical and give it teeth; humane language and a strong connection to your community will make it feel real and give it a heart.

Digital Amnesia - YouTube

A documentary on our digital dark age. Remember this the next time someone trots out the tired old lie that “the internet never forgets.”

If we lose the past, we will live in an Orwellian world of the perpetual present, where anybody that controls what’s currently being put out there will be able to say what is true and what is not. This is a dreadful world. We don’t want to live in this world. —Brewster Kahle

It’s a terrible indictment of where our priorities were for the last 20 years that we depend essentially on children and maniacs to save our history of this sort. —Jason Scott

Laser Light Synths unedited footage on Vimeo

You can catch a glimpse of my Daft Punk impression in this video of Seb’s frickin’ lasers.

BBC World Service - Click, dConstruct Conference

This episode of Click on the BBC World Service does a great job of distilling some of the ideas and themes from this year’s dConstruct.

The Click podcast is available for your huffduffing pleasure.

Two years ago dConstruct’s theme was “Playing with the Future”. Last year it was “Communicating with Machines”. This year’s theme is “Living with the Network”. Click interviews artists, writers, hackers and coders about surveillance, connected devices, big data, and whether the ideals of the internet have been too far corrupted for them ever to be preserved.

For BERG, My London Launchpad | MORNING, COMPUTER

BERG closed its doors today. Their work stands for itself and the agency will be greatly missed.

Warren Ellis shares his memories of the founding of this seminal group.

Hundreds of bright sparks head to Brighton Dome for the Maker Faire - YouTube

This year’s Maker Faire in Brighton was excellent as always.

dConstruct : dconstruct2014 on Huffduffer

All the audio from this year’s dConstruct. Each and every one of these talks is worth listening to …more than once.

Thoughtful, mind-expanding, brain-blowing stuff.

Valley of the Meatpuppets | superflux

Slides and transcript from Anab’s terrific dConstruct talk.

2030: Privacy’s Dead. What happens next? - YouTube

Tom Scott’s energetic dConstruct talk.

Hello, Again — Craig Mod

Craig has redesigned and pulled various bits of his writing from around the web into his own site, prompting some thoughts on the indie web.

The Personal Blog – AVC

There is something about the personal blog, yourname.com, where you control everything and get to do whatever the hell pleases you. There is something about linking to one of those blogs and then saying something. It’s like having a conversation in public with each other. This is how blogging was in the early days. And this is how blogging is today, if you want it to be.

Here I Go Again On My Own : Elizabeth Spiers

In the days before comments on blogs, you could generally have a thoughtful conversation online without everything degenerating into madness and chaos simply because responding to a post required that you wrote a post on your own blog and linked back. This created a certain level of default accountability because if someone wanted to flame you, they had to do it on their own real estate, and couldn’t just crap all over yours anonymously.

Somebody

We are on our way to a bright Maneki Neko future.

44 Medieval Beasts That Cannot Even Handle It Right Now

Look, I would never usually link to a “listicle” on Buzzfeed, but this is all kinds of cumulative mirth.

Jeffrey Zeldman: 20 years of Web Design and Community on Vimeo

A really nice little documentary about my friend Jeffrey.

AurelioDeRosa/HTML5-API-demos

A collection of device APIs—which, despite the title, are all JavaScript, not HTML. Each API in the list has a link to its spec, an explanatory article, a demo, and the current level of support.

The Bocoup Open Device Lab

Mat unveils Boston’s open device lab, and provides a beautiful raison d’être while he’s at it:

Websites work everywhere by default, and they stay that way so long as we know how not to break them. That’s what the Open Web means to me: ensuring that entire populations just setting foot on the web for the first time will find it welcoming, regardless of the devices or connections used to get there.

An Event Apart News: AEA Resources: Articles, Links, and Tools From An Event Apart Chicago 2014

Hyperlinks relating to the talks delivered at An Event Apart in Chicago, including those connected to my rambling musings on progressive enhancement.

A Single Div

Wonderfully creative use of CSS gradients, borders, box-shadows, and generated content.

Opera signs licensing agreement with Microsoft - Opera Software

Opera Mini is about to be installed as the default browser on a few more million phones.

You might want to think about how your Angular-powered JavaScript-required web thang works in one of the world’s most popular web browsers.

How to secure your site in an afternoon - Josh Emerson

Josh walks through the process he took to enabling SSL on his site (with particular attention to securing assets on CloudFront).

A device agnostic approach to inlining CSS | Blog | Decade City

I very much agree with Orde’s framing here: I don’t think it makes much sense to talk about “above the fold” CSS …but it makes a lot of sense to talk about critical CSS.

And, yeah, it’s another example of progressive enhancement.

Improving accessibility on GOV.UK search | Technology at GDS

Alice Bartlett shares her experience of getting aria-live regions to work in a meaningful way.

Pop Sonnets

Modern pop songs retold as Shakespearian sonnets.

Jeremy Keith on the importance of creating products that last | netmag | Creative Bloq

I was interviewed for a feature in issue 257 of net magazine.

In this interview, I pause. And continue.

CSS Guidelines – High-level advice and guidelines for writing sane, manageable, scalable CSS

Harry has written down his ideas and recommendations for writing CSS.

The shoebox - a manifesto for transmat.io

Glenn eloquently gives his reasons for building Transmat:

When I was a child, my brothers and I all had a shoebox each. In these we kept our mementoes. A seashell from a summer holiday where I played for hours in the rock pools, the marble from the schoolyard victory against a bully and a lot of other objects that told a story.

The Internet’s Original Sin - The Atlantic

Ethan Zuckerman riffs on Maciej’s talk at Beyond Tellerrand about the vortex of nastiness that we’ve spiralled down thanks to the default business model of the web: advertising.

A Ficly Farewell on The Writer’s Room - Official Ficly Blog

Now this is how to shut down a service: switch to a read-only archive, and make the codebase (without user credentials) available on Github.

Heydon Pickering | Effortless Style | CSS Day on Vimeo

Remember when I was talking about refactoring the markup for Code for America? Well, it turns out that Heydon Pickering is way ahead of me.

He talks about the viewpoint of a writer (named Victoria) who wants to be able to write in Markdown, or HTML, or a textarea, without having to add classes to everything. That’s going to mean more complex CSS, but it turns out that you can do a lot of complex things in CSS without using class selectors.

There are slides.

RWD Podcast Episode #15 : Jeremy Keith — Responsive Web Design

I had a good ol’ chat with Justin Avery from Responsive Web Design Weekly. We talk about performance, Responsive Day Out, and yes, progressive enhancement.

Tantek Çelik - The once and future IndieWeb - YouTube

Tantek’s great talk on the Indie Web from Web Directions Code in Melbourne earlier this year.

Seeing Like a Network — The Message — Medium

How computers work:

One day, a man name Alan Turing found a magic lamp, and rubbed it. Out popped a genie, and Turing wished for infinite wishes. Then we killed him for being gay, but we still have the wishes.

Then we networked computers together:

The network is ultimately not doing a favor for those in power, even if they think they’ve mastered it for now. It increases their power a bit, it increases the power of individuals immeasurably. We just have to learn to live in the age of networks.

We are all nodes in many networks. This is a beautiful description of how one of those networks operates.

Ind.ie Summit - Video 8 - Jeremy Keith on Vimeo

Here’s the very brief talk I gave about Indie Web Camp at Aral’s Indie Tech Summit here in Brighton a little while back (I was in the slightly-demeaningly-titled “stop gaps” section).

If you like what you hear, come along to the next Indie Web Camp—also in Brighton—in just over three weeks.

The Internet of Things Will Ruin Birthdays — The Message — Medium

A peak at a near-future mundane dystopia from Joanne McNeil that reminds me of Brian’s spime story

Doing is knowing: “Sweet Jane” and the Web — Wordyard

When Rock’n’roll and Web 2.0 collide, the result is not pretty.

Web Archeology - daverupert.com

A bit of web history reacted by Paravel: the Microsoft homepage from 1994. View source to see some ooooold-school markup.

Ah, memories!

The U.S. Digital Services Playbook

Design principles for the newly-formed USDS. I’ve added these to my collection.

UX How-To with Luke Wroblewski - YouTube

A fantastic collection of short videos from Luke on interaction design for devices of all shapes and sizes.

Make yourself a nice cup of tea, hit “Play all”, sit back, relax and learn from the master.

A Spacecraft for All: The Journey of the ISEE-3

A nice bit of interactive citizen science storytelling from Google.

Note: if you have Adblock Plus installed, this won’t load at all. Funny that.

Tablesaw - A Flexible Tool for Responsive Tables

Those lovely people at Filament Group share some of their techniques for making data tables work across a range of screen sizes.

On Blogging - Plausible Thought

If you enjoy writing, or want to enjoy writing, just do it. You’ll probably worry that you have nothing to say, or that what you write is terrible, or that you couldn’t possibly write as well as Neil Gaiman. But silence those voices, get your head down and hit publish on something. Anything. And then do it again. And again.

Pure CSS parallax scrolling websites | Keith Clark

This is clever: a way to achieve parallax scrolling without JavaScript—much more performant.

Of course, you might want to ask yourself why you want a parallax effect in the first place.

Drip, Drop, Groundswell

Cole Peters calls upon designers and developers to realise the power they have to shape the modern world and act accordingly.

It is in those of us who work in tech and on the web that digital privacy may find its greatest chance for survival. As labourers in one of the most pivotal industries of our times, we possess the knowledge and skills required to create tools and ecosystems that defend our privacy and liberties.

I don’t disagree, but I think it’s also important to recognise how much power is in the hands of non-designers and non-developers: journalists, politicians, voters …everyone has a choice to make.

Open standards for contact details and calendar events | Technology at GDS

I’ve been suggesting h-event and h-card as open standards for UK government sites.

We Work in a World of Assumptions – The Pastry Box Project

Dan Donald gets to the heart of progressive enhancement:

Assumptions in themselves don’t have to be inherently bad but let’s recognise them for what they are. We know very little but that can hopefully enable us to be far more flexible and understanding in what we create.

The Web Manifest specification | HTML5 Doctor

The Web Manifest spec is still very much in draft, but it’s worth reading through Bruce’s explanation of it now. Basically, it will provide a way for us to specify in one external file what we currently have to specify in umpteen meta tags and link elements.

A lot can change in 6 years - Allen Pike

An astute comparison of the early years of the web with the early years of the app store. If there’s anything to this, then the most interesting native apps are yet to come. App Store 2.0?

The Mobile Web should just work for everyone - IEBlog

One more reason why you should never sniff user-agent strings: Internet Explorer is going to lie some more. Can’t really blame them though—if developers didn’t insist on making spurious conclusions based on information in the user-agent string, then browsers wouldn’t have to lie.

Oh, and Internet Explorer is going to parse -webkit prefixed styles. Again, if developers hadn’t abused vendor prefixes, we wouldn’t be in this mess.

Events « Brighton Digital Festival

There are 90 events happening in September during the Brighton Digital Festival (including dConstruct, of course). From Maker Faire to an evening of slash fiction, there’s something for everyone.

How we make RWD sites load fast as heck

Scott shares the code that Filament Group are using to determine which style declarations are critical (and can be inlined) and which are non-critical (and can be loaded asynchronously). It makes quite a difference in perceived performance.

By the way, I really, really like the terminology of “critical” and “non-critical” CSS, rather than “above the fold” and “below the fold” CSS.