Tags: a11y

Aesthetics of the invisible | Francesco Schwarz

Hidden little details that make a big difference for screen readers.

A website is only as beautiful as the underlying markup.

HTML5 accessibility

A glanceable one-stop-shop for how today’s browsers are dealing with today’s accessibility features. Then you can dive deeper into each one.

Color Safe - accessible web color combinations

A nice tool for choosing colour palettes that look good and are also accessible.

Microsoft Cognitive Services: Introducing the Seeing AI app - YouTube

Seems like ages since I’ve seen Saqib. He’s been working on something very nifty indeed:

…Seeing AI, a research project that helps people who are visually impaired or blind to better understand who and what is around them. The app is built using intelligence APIs from Microsoft Cognitive Services…

Microsoft’s Radical Bet On A New Type Of Design Thinking

On universal design: “We’re reframing disability as an opportunity.”

One day someone will write a history of the Internet, in which that great series of tubes will emerge as one long chain of inventions not just geared to helping people connect in more ways, but rather, to help more and more types of people communicate just as nimbly as anyone else.

Bruce Lawson’s personal site  : One weird trick to get online — designers hate it!

I don’t care about Opera Mini (I’m not its Product Manager). In the same way, I don’t care about walking sticks, wheelchairs, mobility scooters or guide dogs. But I care deeply about people who use enabling technologies — and Opera Mini is an enabling technology. It allows people on feature phones, low-powered smartphones, people in low-bandwidth areas, people with very small data plans, people who are roaming (you?) connect to the web.

Introducing A11y Toggle

Here’s a bit of convergent evolution: Hugo’s script is similar to what I wrote about recently.

He also raises a point that Kevin mentioned:

I would like to investigate on the details and summary elements as they are basically a native implementation for content toggles.

For some reason details never got much browser love, even though it’s clearly paving a well-trodden cowpath.

Short note on improving usability of scrollable regions

Three very easy to implement additions to scrollable areas of your web pages: tabindex="0", role="region", and an aria-label attribute.

Links, Buttons, Submits, and Divs, Oh Hell | Adrian Roselli

Use the right element for the job.

  • Does the Control Take Me to Another Page? Use an Anchor.
  • Does the Control Change Something on the Current Page? Use a Button.
  • Does the Control Submit Form Fields? Use a Submit.

The accessibility stack: making a better layer cake » Simply Accessible

A great description of a solid architectural approach to building on the web (and not just for accessibility either).

Simple inline error message pattern

This is my go-to method for adding validation messages to forms—I think I first heard about it from Derek—so it’s nice to see it corroborated by Steve:

Add the error message as a child of the label element associated with an input.

The web accessibility basics – Marco’s Accessibility Blog

Marco gives a run-down of the basics of getting accessibility right on the web. Nothing here is particularly onerous but you’d surprised how often developers get this wrong (or simply aren’t aware of it).

He finishes with a plea to avoid unnecessary complexity:

If there’s one wish I have for Christmas from the web developer community at large, it is this: Be good citizens of the web, and learn proper HTML before you even so much as touch any JavaScript framework. Those frameworks are great and offer a lot of features, no doubt. But before you use hundreds of kilobytes of JavaScript to make something clickable, you may want to try if a simple button element doesn’t do the trick just as fine!

HIKE - Introduction to accessibility concepts for the Web

It really isn’t hard to get the basics of accessibility right on the web …and yet those basics are often neglected.

Here’s a handy shortlist to run through, HIKE:

  • H stands for headings and semantic markup.
  • I stands for images and labels.
  • K stands for keyboard navigation.
  • E asks for you to ACT with a little extra love for custom components and more.

(ACT = ARIA, Colour Contrast, Text Size)

HTML Developers: Please Consider | HTML5 Doctor

The best ARIA role is the one you don’t need to use.

Creating a Web Type Lockup | CSS-Tricks

A really great idea from Chris: using SVG to create the web equivalent of type lockups that can scale with all the control you want, while still maintaining accessibility.

Speaking of accessibility, Emil’s comment is very useful indeed.

Why Implementing Swipe Gestures Causes A Mobile Accessibility Issue

Jennison Asuncion outlines the problem with relying on a swipe gesture for interactions.

I would say that this could be expanded to just about any interaction: it’s always dangerous to rely on one specific gesture. It’s always better to either provide multiple ways of accomplishing a task, or to simply take a declarative approach, get out of the way, and let the user agent handle it.

Five Goofy Things Medium Did That Break Accessibility — Medium Engineering

Some mea culpas from a developer at Medium. They share so that we may learn.

Aural UI of HTML elements

This is such an incredibly useful resource by Steve and Léonie: documenting how multiple screen readers handle each and every element in HTML.

It’s a work in progress, but it’s definitely one to remember the next time you’re thinking “I wonder how screen readers treat this markup…”

London Accessibility Meetup #1 - London Accessibility Meetup

The inaugural London accessibility meet-up is happening on October 28th with two great presenters: Robin Christopherson and Julie Howell—that’s right; she’s coming out of retirement for one last talk!

Responsive Field Day

All the videos from the excellent Responsive Field Day are now available. Even better, the audio is also available for your huffduffing pleasure!

All the presentations and panels were great. Sophie Shepherd’s terrific talk has really stuck with me.

Where to Put Your Search Role by Adrian Roselli

This is a very handy tip. I had been putting form role="search" all over The Session. Turns out that’s overriding the default role of “form”. Oops!

An album for a11y | HeydonWorks

Heydon’s putting together a collection of songs from webby people. I need to either give him a Salter Cane track or record some tunes for this.

tota11y – an a11y visualization toolkit

A handy little bookmarklet for doing some quick accessibility checks.

The Many Faces of The Web

Instead of coming up with all these new tools and JavaScript frameworks, shouldn’t we try to emphasize the importance of learning the underlying fundamentals of the web? Teach those who are just stepping to this medium and starting their careers. By not making our stack more and more complex, but by telling about the best practices that should guide our work and the importance of basic things.

Dev.Opera — UX accessibility with aria-label

A great run-down by Heydon of just one ARIA property: aria-label.

Accessibility Wins

Marcy’s Tumblr blog of examples of accessibility in action on the web.

Let Links Be Links · An A List Apart Article

A superb piece by Ross Penman on the importance of being true to the spirit of the web.

Describe Me

A great Zooniverse-style project for the website of Australia’s Museum Victoria that allows you to provide descriptions for blind and low-vision people.

Bruce Lawson’s personal site  : On the accessibility of web components. Again.

I completely share Bruce’s concern about the year-zero thinking that’s accompanying a lot of the web components marketing:

Snarking aside, why do so few people talk about extending existing HTML elements with web components? Why’s all the talk about brand new custom elements? I don’t know.

Hear, hear!

I’m a fan of web components. But I’m increasingly worried about the messaging surrounding them.

Accessibility of Web Components

A great presentation on web components by Marcy, with an emphasis on keeping them accessible.

ARIA Quicktip: Labelledby vs. Describedby, From the Notebook of Aaron Gustafson

Yesterday, Aaron gave a great talk at BD Conf about forms. In one example, he was using aria-describedby. I was a bit confused by the differences between aria-describedby and aria-labelledby, so Aaron has very helpfully clarified the distinction.

Replacing Radio Buttons Without Replacing Radio Buttons

A great technique from Heydon for styling radio buttons however you want.

Practical ARIA Examples

Heydon Pickering put together a great collection of accessible self-contained interface patterns that demonstrate smart use of ARIA.

Advancements in the accessibility of Facebook on Marco’s accessibility blog

It’s great to see the changes that Facebook’s four-person accessibility team have managed to push through.

The Accessibility Project

This is a great initiative. I’m going to learn a lot from it. I hope that I might even be able to contribute to it sometime.

Accessibility – what is it good for? | Marco’s accessibility blog

A worrying look at how modern web developers approach accessibility. In short, they don’t.

Easy Fixes to Common Accessibility Problems | Yahoo! Accessibility Library

The low-hanging fruit of accessibility fixes; it’s worth bearing these in mind.