Tags: css

Cursors

A self-describing list of cursors available through CSS.

JS Bin: Vertical centering is impossible in CSS lol!

Four different techniques for vertical centring in CSS, courtesy of Jake.

Axiomatic CSS and Lobotomized Owls · An A List Apart Article

I’m quite intrigued by the thinking behind this CSS selector of Heydon’s.

* + * {
    margin-top: 1.5em;
}

I should try it out and see how it feels.

Replacing Radio Buttons Without Replacing Radio Buttons

A great technique from Heydon for styling radio buttons however you want.

Solved By Flexbox — Cleaner, hack-free CSS

Documenting common layout issues that can be solved with Flexbox. I like the fact that some of these can be used as enhancements e.g. sticky footer, input add-ons …the fallback in older browsers is perfectly acceptable.

A Single Div

Wonderfully creative use of CSS gradients, borders, box-shadows, and generated content.

A device agnostic approach to inlining CSS | Blog | Decade City

I very much agree with Orde’s framing here: I don’t think it makes much sense to talk about “above the fold” CSS …but it makes a lot of sense to talk about critical CSS.

And, yeah, it’s another example of progressive enhancement.

CSS Guidelines – High-level advice and guidelines for writing sane, manageable, scalable CSS

Harry has written down his ideas and recommendations for writing CSS.

Heydon Pickering | Effortless Style | CSS Day on Vimeo

Remember when I was talking about refactoring the markup for Code for America? Well, it turns out that Heydon Pickering is way ahead of me.

He talks about the viewpoint of a writer (named Victoria) who wants to be able to write in Markdown, or HTML, or a textarea, without having to add classes to everything. That’s going to mean more complex CSS, but it turns out that you can do a lot of complex things in CSS without using class selectors.

There are slides.

Pure CSS parallax scrolling websites | Keith Clark

This is clever: a way to achieve parallax scrolling without JavaScript—much more performant.

Of course, you might want to ask yourself why you want a parallax effect in the first place.

How we make RWD sites load fast as heck

Scott shares the code that Filament Group are using to determine which style declarations are critical (and can be inlined) and which are non-critical (and can be loaded asynchronously). It makes quite a difference in perceived performance.

By the way, I really, really like the terminology of “critical” and “non-critical” CSS, rather than “above the fold” and “below the fold” CSS.

Full-width pinned layouts with flexbox

Zoe uses one little case study to contrast two different CSS techniques: display-table and flexbox. Flexbox definitely comes out on top when it comes to true source-order independence.

Radio-Controlled Web Design · An A List Apart Article

Turns out that the :checked pseudo-class selector allows you to do some clever interaction without JavaScript.

Let’s Talk About RTL

Some very handy techniques for working with right-to-left text.

A Maintainable Style Guide - Ian Feather

The challenges of maintaining a living breathing front-end style guide for an always-evolving product (the Lonely Planet website in this case).

GitHub’s CSS · @mdo

Mark Otto talks through the state of Github’s CSS and the processes behind updating it. There’s a nice mix of pragmatism and best practices, together with a recognition that there’s always room for improvement.

simpl.info

A handy reference for HTML, CSS, and JavaScript features. Each feature has a bare-bones demo at a nice guessable URL e.g. http://simpl.info/datalist/

A no-javascript toggle content feature

A clever way of doing progressive disclosure with CSS.

Getting Back That Lovin’ Feeling on Sparkbox

A lovely little tale of empowerment through HTML and CSS.

Comparing two ways to load non-critical CSS

Scott’s trying to find out the best ways to load critical CSS first and non-critical CSS later. Good discussion ensues.

It’s OK not to use tools by Jonas Downey of Basecamp

Today, a basic HTML/CSS site seems almost passé. But why? Is it because our new tools are so significantly better, or because we’ve gone overboard complicating simple things?

He’s right, y’know.

Single Element CSS Spinners

A lovely little selection of loading indicators powered by CSS animations and transitions.

Incomplete List of Mistakes in the Design of CSS [CSS Working Group Wiki]

I think I concur with this list. Although I guess it’s worth remembering that, given the size of the CSS spec, this isn’t an overly-long list.

It’s interesting that quite a few of them are about how things are named. It’s almost as if that’s one of the, say, two hardest things in computer science.

Learn CSS Selectors interactively

This visual approach to demonstrating how CSS selectors work is really handy.

Creating Style Guides · An A List Apart Article

A great article by Susan on getting started with creating a styleguide for any project.

I’ve seen firsthand how style guides save development time, make communication regarding your front end smoother, and keep both code and design consistent throughout the site.

Confessions Of A CSS Expert

Funny because it’s true:

The thing I regret the most is how my class addiction affected my relationship with HTML.

CSS A/Z

The alphabet illustrated with CSS.

Jonathan T. Neal | Thoughts on Media Queries for Elements

Some good ideas on the idea of element-level media queries, a feature that developers are crying out for and browser makers are saying is too hard. This post has some thoughts on how to deal with the potential issues.

Label Pattern - CodePen

This looks like a nifty take on the ol’ using-labels-like-placeholders pattern for forms. I still prefer to have a label visible at all times, but this seems like a nice compromise.

Getting Started With Pattern Libraries ∙ An A List Apart Blog Post

A great post from Anna on the front-end styleguides she’s worked on for A List Apart and Code for America. ‘Twas a pleasure working with her on the Code for America project.

A-mer-ica! Fuck yeah!

Flexbox for forms - German for black

Here’s a clever use of flexbox: have a form field stretch to fill up most of the space and a button fill up what’s left.

Bulletproof Accessible Icon Fonts | Filament Group, Inc., Boston, MA

An in-depth look at using icon fonts without any nasty edge-cases ruining your day.

About Variables in CSS and Abstractions in Web Languages | CSS-Tricks

Chris has a written a response to my post (which was itself inspired by his excellent An Event Apart presentation) all about CSS, variables, and abstractions.

I love this kind of old-school blog-to-blog discussion.

Happy 17th Birthday CSS | Web Directions

A lovely history lesson on CSS from John.

Myth - CSS the way it was imagined.

This looks interesting: a CSS postprocessor that polyfills support for perfectly cromulent styles.

The (other) Web we lost

John shares his concerns about the increasing complexity involved in developing for the web.

Building for the device agnostic web | Talks | Decade City

Some excellent practical advice on progressive enhancement.

Responsive scrollable tables | 456 Berea Street

I like this CSS solution to sideways-scrolling tables for small viewports. It’s not going to be right for every situation but it’s a handy trick to keep up your sleeve.

Jeremy Keith – The Power Of Simplicity – border:none

This is the talk I gave at the border:none event in Nuremberg last month. I really enjoyed it. This was a chance to gather together some thoughts I’ve been mulling over for a while about how we approach front-end development today …and tomorrow.

Warning: it does get quite ranty towards the end.

Also: it is only now that the video is released that I see I spent the entire talk looking like a dork with a loop of wire sticking out of the back of my head.

Wallop Slider

I hate carousels, but if you’re going to have one, this progressively enhanced approach looks pretty good.

Progressive Enhancement. Still Alive and Kickin’

Dan explains the reasoning behind his “Sigh, JavaScript” Tumblr blog, and provides an excellent example of progressive enhancement in the process.

Go, Dan, go!

Not Real Programming by John Allsopp

A terrific long-zoom look at web technologies, pointing out that the snobbishness towards declarative languages is a classic example of missing out on the disruptive power of truly innovative ideas …much like the initial dismissive attitude towards the web itself.

Create a responsive ad unit - AdSense Help

Looks like Google are offering responsive (or at least adaptive) ad sizes.

Media Query Events Example

A page to demonstrate the conditional CSS technique I documented a while back.

Style Guide Boilerplate

A very handy starting point for creating a front-end style guide.

Why the Web Doesn’t Need Another CSS Zen Garden - YouTube

A great history lesson from Dave.

Ah, I remember when the CSS Zen Garden was all fields. Now get off my CSS lawn.

Web Fonts and the Critical Path - Ian Feather

The battle between web fonts and performance. Ian Feather outlines some possible solutions, but of course, as always, the answer is “it depends”.

Text-align: Justify and RWD

Here’s a nifty trick: using text-align: justify to get a nice responsive grid layout.

Using icon fonts

A handy walkthrough of using icon fonts. The examples here use the excellent IcoMoon service

CSS is not an amoral monster.

I’m in general agreement with this rousing defence of CSS. I think it does a pretty great job of balancing a whole ton of use cases.

mezzoblue § 10 Years

Wow! The CSS Zen Garden is a decade old. Crazy! It’s a true piece of web history …and it’s back!

List of pseudo-elements to style form controls by TJ VanToll

Want to style those new HTML5 input types? I hope you like vendor prefixes.

Specializing yourself into a corner by Scott Kellum

I can empathise with Scott’s worries about fragmentation on the front-end with Saas, Styles, LESS, Compass, yada, yada, yada.

I want to share my code with everyone who writes CSS, not a subset of that group.

How to lose weight (in the browser)

A handy one-stop-shop for tips on improving front-end performance.

Learn CSS layout

A handy step-by-step guide to all the ways you can use CSS for layout.

Using SVG on CSS-Tricks

Chris takes a look at all the different ways you can use SVG today.

Logical breakpoints for your responsive design

Vasilis examines the multitude of factors that could influence an ideal measure.

CSS 3D Clouds

A beautiful experiment with CSS transforms and a smattering of JavaScript.

Protip: All browsers that support SVG background images also supports multiple background images.

A very hand tip from Ben on using SVG background images with a PNG fallback for IE8 and below.

The Vanilla Web Diet by Christian Heilman

I like the sound of the book that Chris is writing for Smashing Magazine. It sounds like a very future-friendly approach to front-end development.

On the styling of forms by Bruce Lawson

Bruce takes a look at the tricky issue of styling native form controls. Help us, Shadow DOM, you’re our only hope!

Front-end performance for web designers and front-end developers by Harry Roberts

A really good introduction to front-end performance techniques. Most of this was already on my radar, but I still picked up a handy tip or two (particularly about DNS prefetching).

At this stage it should go without saying that you should be keeping up with this kind of thing: performance is really, really, really important.

Implementing off-canvas navigation for a responsive website by David Bushell

This off-canvas demo is a great practical example of progressive enhancement from David. It’s also a lesson in why over-reliance on jQuery can sometimes be problematic.

All you need to know about CSS Transitions | Alex MacCaw

An in-depth look at CSS transitions with some handy tips for improving performance.

Why you should say HTML classes, CSS class selectors, or CSS pseudo-classes, but not CSS classes - Tantek

I love that Tantek is as pedantic as I am …although I don’t think “pedantic” is exactly the right word.

Andy Hume: CSS for Grownups, SXSW 2012 - YouTube

The slides and audio from Andy’s exceptional talk earlier this year at Southby, combined into one video.

It really is excellent, although he does make the mistake of pulling the “dogma” card on those who woud disagree with him, and he really doesn’t need to: his argument is strong enough to stand on its own.

display: none; | Laura Kalbag

Laura explains the problems with hiding content for small screens, and uses this as an opportunity to elucidate why you should blog, even if you’re think that no-one would be interested in what you have to say:

The point I’m trying to make is that we shouldn’t be fearful of writing about what we know. Even if you write from the most basic point of view, about something which has been ‘around for ages’, you’ll likely be saying something new to someone. They might be new to the industry, you might just be filling in the holes in someone’s knowledge.

Let’s Talk Solar | LOGO24

Here’s a really useful case study for anyone who wants to do “guerrilla” responsive design: when you’re handed a fixed-width mockup but you know that responsive is the way to go:

I started by styling up every element, without layout. The result was a fully elastic layout that effectively served as a mobile, or small screen, layout, which just needed some tweaking of horizontal spacing.

Bingo! And this approach had knock-on benefits as it “supported writing component-based, or modular, CSS”.

❍ IcoMoon

This is a great free service for generating small subsetted icon fonts. Launch the app and have a play around — you can choose from the icons provided or you can import your own SVG shapes.

Nice touch: you can get the resulting font (mapped to your choice of unicode characters) base-64 encoded for your stylesheet.

Base CSS | Pasteup | Guardian News

The Guardian’s front-end patterns library. The modules section contains their equivalent of a pattern primer. Very nice!

IE10 Snap Mode and Responsive Design - TimKadlec.com

Useful advice from Tim on preparing your responsive site for IE10’s new “snap mode”. Don’t worry: it doesn’t involve adding any proprietary crap …quite the opposite, in fact.

CSSquirrel : The Savage Beatings Anti-Pattern

CSSquirrel shares my feelings on the email notification anti-pattern.

Max CSS

I like this suggestion. If you’re using minified CSS in production, it would be a nice gesture to have an easily-discoverable unminified version for people to view source on.

CSSquirrel : Game Break | opinions and news on web design by Kyle Weems

Hey look; Anna’s in a CSSquirrel comic! And for good reason: Kyle is as impressed as I am with Anna’s research into browsers on gaming devices.

There’s also a call for more community device labs. I approve.

Mobile Navigation Icons | TimKadlec.com

Tim shows how to make a scalable three-line navicon in CSS.

Uncle Dave’s Ol’ Padded Box - Dave Rupert

Yet another brilliant technique from Dave. The only caveat is that it uses background images rather than img elements, but it’s still very powerful (and very clever).

» 29 June 2012, baked by Lea Verou @ The Pastry Box Project

I thoroughly agree with Lea’s approach. It’s all about the craft.

Classes? Where We’re Going, We Don’t Need Classes! | Smashing Coding

This is a well-reasoned, thoughtful article on avoiding class names in CSS …but I don’t agree with it. That said, perhaps there’s a reasonable middle ground to be found between this extreme stance and the opposite (but in some ways just as extreme) stance of OOCSS.

How We Improved Page Speed By Cleaning CSS, HTML and Images | Dyn Blog

Some good practical advice on improving performance. This should all be familiar to you, but it’s always worth repeating.

Single-direction margin declarations — CSS Wizardry—CSS, Web Standards, Typography, and Grids by Harry Roberts

Some smart thinking from Harry Roberts on standardising the direction of your margins in CSS i.e. all top-margin or all bottom-margin declarations.

necolas/idiomatic-css

Some sensible ideas about having a consistent CSS writing style.

Build a smart mobile navigation without hacks | Tutorial | .net magazine

A really great markup and CSS pattern for “content first, navigation second” from Aaron.

IE-friendly mobile-first CSS with Sass 3.2

Jake demonstrates his technique for preprocessor-generated stylesheets for older versions of Internet Explorer (while other browsers get the same styles within media queries).

Issue #408: Generate a separate css with flattened media queries

This is an excellent idea from Jake: use a preprocessor to automatically spit out a stylesheet for older versions of IE that includes desktop styles (garnered from the declarations within media queries).

If you’re a dab hand with Ruby and you’d like to see this in SASS, you can help.

FixMyStreet

Not only is FixMyStreet responsive, it’s using the “display: table-caption” trick I documented for adjustable “content first/navigation second” source order.

Shopping Cart example

A nifty example of responsive tables. View source to see how it’s done.

Like A Rounded Corner (Bruce and The Standardettes) - YouTube

Bravo, Bruce, bravo.

I heard Glen Campbell’s “Like A Rhinestone Cowboy” on the radio and began absent-mindedly singing “Like a rounded corner” to it.

A New Take on Responsive Tables by ZURB

An interesting approach to squishing down large data tables for small-screen viewing …though I wonder if there isn’t a “Mobile First” approach that could scale up, say, lists to become tables on large screens.

Springload: OnMediaQuery - Responsive Javascript

This is nice: the solution I blogged about for conditional CSS (reading media queries from JavaScript) all wrapped up in a nice small reusable bundle.

Proposition to change the prefixing policy from Florian Rivoal on 2012-05-04 (www-style@w3.org from May 2012)

This seems like a sensible way for browsers to approach implementing vendor-prefixed CSS properties.

Jordan Moore | Building With Content Choreography

Using flexbox to creata a narrow-column stacking order that’s unrelated to the source order.

Creating a Mobile-First Responsive Web Design - HTML5 Rocks

A great step-by-step tutorial from Brad on developing a responsive site with a Content First mindset.

Breakpoint Checking in Javascript with CSS User Values | Sparkbox

A smart response to the little conundrum I posted on my blog yesterday about detecting media-query quarantined CSS properties from JavaScript.

What’s the Deal With Display: Inline-Block? | Design Shack

When I linked to the Toast framework the other day, I mentioned that I was intrigued by its use of inline-block for layout. Here’s a more detailed analysis of how display: inline-block works, along with some caveats.

Toast | A simple CSS framework

This is interesting, not because it’s yet another grid framework (which I never use anyway) but because of the way it’s doing layout: with border-box and inline-block, rather than floats. If you’re only serving up your layout styles to browsers that support media queries (which would discount older versions of IE anyway), this could make a lot of sense.

A List Apart: Articles: Creating Intrinsic Ratios for Video

This really is a ridiculously smart way of keeping third-party videos scalable in responsive layouts. I’ve just implemented it on this year’s dConstruct site.

Media Query & Asset Downloading Results | TimKadlec.com

Tim has published the results of a whole bunch of testing he did on how different browsers deal with hidden or replaced images.

Paperfold CSS | Demo Studio | Mozilla Developer Network

In amongst all the shiny demos on this site, this one could actually be useful.

Untitled ✿ dabblet.com

Here’s a handy little tip for CSS animations: instead of changing position properties, use translate instead.

Content Folding | CSS-Tricks

An interesting idea from Chris: instead of linearising content on smaller screens, what if you could interweave it instead? Theoretically, CSS regions makes it possible, regardless of source order.