Tags: guardian

Steve Albini on the surprisingly sturdy state of the music industry

Steve Albini’s barnstorming keynote address at Melbourne’s Face the Music conference.

The right to flight: why I’m flying a balloon over London this summer

Watch the skies: James Bridle’s balloon will be hovering above London distributing wifi.

Navigating the Guardian | Help | The Guardian

A peek behind the scenes of an interesting new navigation pattern on the Guardian’s still-in-beta responsive site.

You can try it out here

Guardian beta · The container model and blended content – a new approach to how we present content on the Guardian

This is what Oliver was talking about Responsive Day Out 2 — a new approach to information architecture.

Cast off your sidebars! You have nothing to lose but your grids!

Notes on a responsive Guardian redesign – Lozworld™

A great write-up of the design process behind The Guardian’s responsive site. It’s really gratifying to see UX designers talking about performance.

Kyle Bean - Whistleblower

If you picked up the Guardian this weekend, you’ll have seen some brilliant work by Kyle on the cover (and inside) the magazine section.

Brian Aldiss: ‘These days I don’t read any science fiction. I only read Tolstoy’ | Books | The Guardian

A profile of Brian Aldiss in The Guardian.

I still can’t quite believe I managed to get him for last year’s Brighton SF.

NSA files decoded: Edward Snowden’s surveillance revelations explained

A superb piece of hypertext from The Guardian.

When politicians get the internet wrong, the internet can be ruthless by Caroline Criado-Perez

Oh, dear. An otherwise perfectly well-reasoned article makes this claim:

But the internet is peculiarly adapted to deftly pricking pomposity. This is partly because nothing dies online, meaning your past indiscretions are never yesterday’s news, wrapped round the proverbial fish and chips.

Bollocks. Show me the data to back up this claim.

The insidious truism that “the internet never forgets” is extremely harmful. The true problem is the opposite: the internet forgets all the time.

Geocities, Pownce, Posterous, Vox, and thousands more sites are very much yesterday’s news, wrapped round the proverbial fish and chips.

DRM and HTML5: it’s now or never for the Open Web

Dr Harry Halpin writing in the Guardian about the crucial crossroads that we have reached with the very real possibility of DRM mechanisms becoming encoded within HTML:

Most of us are simply happy to launch our browsers and surf the web without a second thought as to how the standards like HTML are created. These standards are in the hands of a fairly small set of standards bodies that have in general acted as responsible stewards for the last few years. The issue of DRM in HTML may be the turning point where all sorts of organisations and users are going to stop taking the open web for granted.

Brewster’s trillions: Internet Archive strives to keep web history alive

A profile in The Guardian of the Internet Archive and my hero, Brewster Kahle (who also pops up in the comments).

Google Keep? It’ll probably be with us until March 2017 - on average

Charles Arthur analyses the data from Google’s woeful history of shutting down its services.

So if you want to know when Google Keep, opened for business on 21 March 2013, will probably shut - again, assuming Google decides it’s just not working - then, the mean suggests the answer is: 18 March 2017. That’s about long enough for you to cram lots of information that you might rely on into it; and also long enough for Google to discover that, well, people aren’t using it to the extent that it hoped.

Anatomy of a responsive page load

The slides from Andy’s excellent pragmatic talk on performance and aggressive enhancement at the Responsive Day Out.

Fragmented world: what two years of traffic data teaches you about mobile | Info | guardian.co.uk

A great breakdown of mobile traffic to The Guardian website over time.

Base CSS | Pasteup | Guardian News

The Guardian’s front-end patterns library. The modules section contains their equivalent of a pattern primer. Very nice!

Responsive IA: IA in the touchscreen era - Martin Belam at EuroIA

A really terrific piece about wireframing for responsive designs. Again, it’s all about the prototypes.

Guardian Truncation Team

Celebrating the work of the tireless men and women who shorten headlines so they’ll fit on your iPhone.

The Guardian

Remember when I linked to the Github repository of The Guardian’s front-end team? Well, now—if you’ll pardon the mixing of metaphors—you can start to kick the tyres of the fruits of their labour. This beta site shows where their experiments with responsive design might lead.

beta.guardian.co.uk

Those clever chaps at The Guardian are experimenting with some mobile-first responsive design. Here’s how it’s going so far.

The code is on Github.

Linked Data at the Guardian | Open Platform | guardian.co.uk

A great write-up of the latest additions to the Guardian's Open Platform API including a lukewarm assessment of Semantic Web technologies like RDF.

This is a news website article about a scientific finding | Martin Robbins | Science | guardian.co.uk

A perfect parody lampooning the shallow and cowardly reporting of most so-called science stories by the press (I'm looking at you, BBC).

Concerning FourSquare · Ben Ward

A great Fisking by Ben of (very silly, IMHO) morally panicked Guardian article on Foursquare.

OpenPlatform Content API Explorer

A handy interface onto The Guardian's new API.

Ten years of the Guardian online - plotted in expletives

Trust Tom to use the Guardian's new API for the purpose of answering those pressing questions, like "is fuckknuckle *really* the new cockbadger?"

Data Store: Facts you can use |

The Guardian has released a shedload of data for us to play with. Go forth and hack.

BBC Builders: Web developer Simon Cross on personalisation and the semantic web |

A lovely shout-out to Clearleft from the BBC: "Along with other awesome UK companies like ClearLeft, we hope the work we're doing influences more web companies to adopt more best practice, like following the principle of 'progressive enhancement'."

GameCamp | Technology | guardian.co.uk

Aleks and Bobbie are putting on GameCamp in London on May 2nd. Should be fun.

Podcast: Welcome to Tech weekly from the Guardian | Technology | Guardian Unlimited

There's a new technology podcast available from The Guardian. It's hosted by Aleks and judging from the first episode, it's going to be very good indeed.

Top 10 dotcoms to watch | Technology | Guardian Unlimited

Bobbie draws up a list of UK startups to keep an eye on. Moo is here of course but so is Dopplr.

Guardian Unlimited

The front page of The Guardian website has been redesigned with some good use of typography and colour. Shame it's so wide though.

Cá Bhfuil Na Gaeilgeoirí? | The Guardian | Guardian Unlimited

Can you really get by in Ireland by just speaking Irish? Not in Dublin, it seems. I'd love to see the TV show that this article is based on.

Guardian Unlimited | Special reports | Suspicious behaviour on the tube

A truly frightening description of what can happen to any person in Britain today.

Simon Bisson: Old dog learns new tricks

Ajax in The Guardian.

Bomb blasts plunge London into chaos from Guardian Unlimited: Newsblog

The Guardian blog is keeping a running update on events in London.

No more beating about the Bush from Guardian Unlimited: Newsblog

Amazing news! George Bush says, "Let's get rid of all subsidies together. Let's join hands as wealthy industrialised nations and say to the world, we're going to get rid of all our subsidies together."

Ben Hammersley: Second Sight

In the Guardian: Yahoo is the new Google. Google is the new Yahoo.