Tags: privacy

Known: taking a big bet on the #indieweb

When I’ve been banging on at conferences about digital preservation, personal publishing and the indie web, I’ve been at pains to point out that there are huge opportunities here for startups looking to build valet services to help people publish on their own domain.

Ben and Erin at Known are doing just that, with some backing from KQED, PRX and the Knight Foundation instead of the usual short-sighted Silicon Valley venture capitalism.

One of the jobs of a startup is to look at where the world is going, extrapolating from current trends and domain knowledge, and meet a future need with a product at exactly the right time. We think the time is right for an independent web that is owned by content creators and readers alike.

The Internet With A Human Face - Beyond Tellerrand 2014 Conference Talk

The transcript of Maciej’s talk from Beyond Tellerrand on how the web has become more and more centralised:

The degree of centralization is remarkable. Consider that Google now makes hardware, operating systems, and a browser.

It’s not just possible, but fairly common for someone to visit a Google website from a Google device, using Google DNS servers and a Google browser on the way.

This is a level of of end-to-end control that would have caused us to riot in the streets if Microsoft had attempted it in 1999. But times have changed.

Can This Alternative Smartphone Deliver Real Privacy to the Masses? | Co.Exist | ideas + impact

Fast Company features Aral’s tantalising Indie Phone project that he’s been working on at Clearleft Towers.

Good to see Oskar the dog getting the recognition he deserves.

On the top floor of a commercial building in the old maritime city of Brighton, England, Balkan has been quietly hacking away at Indie Phone for the last several months with the rest of his team—Victor Johansson, an industrial designer, Laura Kalbag, a professional web designer (and Balkan’s partner), and her Husky, Oskar.

NSA files decoded: Edward Snowden’s surveillance revelations explained

A superb piece of hypertext from The Guardian.

Google Profiles “Shared Endorsements”

You might want to untick the checkbox at the bottom of this screen:

Based upon my activity, Google may show my name and profile photo in shared endorsements that appear in ads.

Silicon Valley through a PRISM · Ben Ward

Ben is rightly worried by the blasé attitude in the tech world to the PRISM revelations. Perhaps that attitude stems from a culture of “log everything by default”?

I think there’s a deep rooted trait within this industry that sedates the outrage. That is the normality, complicity, and dependency on ‘surveillance’ in the software we make.

We know what you’re doing… A social networking privacy experiment by Callum Haywood

A grab-bag of public updates on Facebook.

Privacy Patterns

Cataloguing patterns (best practices, really) for privacy-concious site owners.

The Case Against Google

An in-depth look at where Google is going wrong.

Clean up ALL Your Applications Privacy Settings in 2 Minutes

A one-stop-shop with links to the authentication settings of various online services. Take the time to do a little Spring cleaning.

EU law change regarding use of cookies | Torchbox

A translation into plain English of the recent changes in the law regarding cookies in the UK. In short, keep calm and carry on.

Nanolaw with Daughter (Ftrain.com)

A superbly written piece of near-future legal-dystopian speculative fiction. Damn, that Paul Ford can write!

Tell-all telephone | Data Protection | Digital | ZEIT ONLINE

A dataviz demo of creepiness: displaying the movements of Malte Spitz by correlating her phone activity and web usage.

4thamendmentwear

Metallic ink-printed undershirts and underwear. For Americans who wish to assert their rights without saying a word.

The Web Means the End of Forgetting - NYTimes.com

This article needs a great big "citation needed" slapped on it. Yes, people need to think about what they post on the web, but no, that stuff will not stay around "forever." If anything, the web suffers from the opposite problem: memory loss.

Concerning FourSquare · Ben Ward

A great Fisking by Ben of (very silly, IMHO) morally panicked Guardian article on Foursquare.

Making Light: The lily knows not why it blossoms in the spring

Before we point the finger and laugh at the Facebook users leaving confused comments on Read Write Web, we should look to our own experiences with Google Buzz.

Blissbat Loves Books » Blog Archive » Google Buzz Screws Up

Erin explains exactly how badly Google have messed up privacy concerns with Buzz.

Fuck you, Google « Fugitivus

A frightening tale of just how badly Google messed up with the lack of privacy controls on Buzz.

Wait till I come! » Blog Archive » Detecting and displaying the information of a logged-in twitter user

Clever or creepy? You decide.

It’s high time we moved to URL-based identifiers | FactoryCity

Chris says that URLs are people too: "You’ve got my URL, now, tell me, what else do you really need?"

From The Magazine : Radar Online : Cory Doctorow imagines a world in which Google is evil

Scroogled is a short story by Cory Doctorow that's especially timely.

Facebook's Misrepresentation of Beacon's Threat to Privacy: Tracking users who opt out or are not logged in. - CA Security Advisor Research Blog - CA

An excellent piece of research that shows how Facebook affiliates' cross-site scripting (Beacon) sends information back to the mothership regardless of whether the user has opted out.

::HorsePigCow:: marketing uncommon » The insidious danger of danger

Tara talks about the damaging effect on women who believe that to protect themselves, they cannot be truly open online.

Bug 330884 - When different users on one system choose to save or not save passwords for sites, any other user can see sites they not only saved passwords for but can also see what other users have been saving/never saving passwords for.

The guy who submitted this Mozilla bug writes "This privacy flaw has caused my fiancé and I to break-up after having dated for 5 years."