Jeremy Keith

Jeremy Keith

Making websites. Writing books. Speaking at conferences. Living in Brighton. Working at Clearleft. Playing music. Taking photos. Answering email.

Journal 2344 sparkline Links 6268 sparkline Articles 66 sparkline Notes 2768 sparkline

Friday, December 9th, 2016

Foreword to Working The Command Line by Remy Sharp

The foreword to the brief book published by A Book Apart.

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before…

You’ve just followed a link to a cool-sounding new resource that one of your friends has recommended. Now you’re reading about how this could help you in your day-to-day work on the web. You excitedly click through to the documentation where the installation instructions are laid out before you. That’s when your heart sinks. “This is moon language!” you cry.

You are not alone. I don’t just mean that there are many of us who feel the same way. I mean you are literally not alone. You have Remy with you. He will be your guide.

I’ll be keeping this book close to hand when I’m navigating the intimidating dark depths of the Command Line Interface. But this isn’t a reference book. It’s more like a self-help book. This book will help me—and you—become a more efficient developer, better equipped to battle moon language. “It’s a UNIX system”, you’ll whisper. “I know this!”

Having read this book, I now have one question I ask myself before I confront an inevitable task on the command line: What Would Remy Do?

When it comes to the command line, WWRD will serve you in good stead (Warning: when it comes to just about any other aspect of your daily life, WWRD will almost certainly be disastrous).

What Would Remy Do? The answers lie within these pages…

Thursday, December 8th, 2016

Server Side React

Remy wants to be able to apply progressive enhancement to React: server-side and client-side rendering, sharing the same codebase. He succeeded, but…

In my opinion, an individual or a team starting out, or without the will, aren’t going to use progressive enhancement in their approach to applying server side rendering to a React app. I don’t believe this is by choice, I think it’s simply because React lends itself so strongly to client-side, that I can see how it’s easy to oversee how you could start on the server and progressive enhance upwards to a rich client side experience.

I’m hopeful that future iterations of React will make this a smoother option.

What the Heck Is Inclusive Design? ◆ 24 ways

I really, really like Heydon’s framing of inclusive design: yes, it covers accessibility, but it’s more than that, and it’s subtly different to universal design.

He also includes some tips which read like design principles to me:

  • Involve code early
  • Respect conventions
  • Don’t be exact
  • Enforce simplicity

Come to think of it, they’re really good design principles in that they are all reversible i.e. you could imagine the polar opposites being design principles elsewhere.

Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

Is JavaScript more fragile? – Baldur Bjarnason

Progressive enhancement’s core value proposition, for me, is that HTML and CSS have features that are powerful in their own right. Using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript together makes for more reliable products than just using Javascript alone in a single-page-app.

This philosophy doesn’t apply to every website out there, but it sure as hell applies to a lot of them.

DiceWARE

This is a wonderful service! Handcrafted artisanal passwords made with a tried and trusted technique:

You roll a die 5 times and write down each number. Then you look up the resulting five-digit number in the Diceware dictionary, which contains a numbered list of short words.

That’s the description from the site’s creator, Mira:

Please keep in mind when ordering that I am a full-time sixth grade student with a lot of homework.

She’s the daughter of Julia Angwin, author of Dragnet Nation.

Pappardelle with slow-cooked lamb, smoked aubergine, and ricotta salata.

Pappardelle with slow-cooked lamb, smoked aubergine, and ricotta salata.