Archive: December, 2011

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Saturday, December 31st, 2011

On lucky breaks and saying yes « this is rachelandrew.co.uk

Rachel tells the tale of how she came to be the splendid web worker she is and finishes with some advice for up-and-coming workers of the web:

Make 2012 the year you go out and do it.

BBC News - Hackers plan space satellites to combat censorship

The network will interpret SOPA as damage and route around it …with SCIENCE!

College Misery: Henchminion Sends In the Tale of “The Magna Carta Essay!”

A trojan horse for plagiarised college papers, much like the fakery on maps (“Lie Close”, “Arlington”) and in dictionaries; traps to be sprung on the hapless copy’n’paster.

daniel sinker • Hacker-Journalism 2011: A year of “show your work”

A look back at some of the best code for journalism over the past year.

Friday, December 30th, 2011

12412 - Experience and learn 12 new web technologies in 12 months

Here’s a challenge for the new year: use each month as an opportunity to try out a new web technology.

Set yourself small, achievable projects to work on and use 12412.org as a support group. We will all help to motivate each other and join in to offer help where we can.

The maker makes: on design, community, and personal empowerment – Jeffrey Zeldman Presents The Daily Report

This. This is why I love the web.

Not only does the web make publishers of those willing to put in the work, it also makes most of us free sharers of our hard-won trade, craft, and business secrets. The minute we grab hold of a new angle on design, interaction, code, or content, we share it with a friend — or with friends we haven’t met yet.

On designing content-out (a response to Zeldman and others) | Stephanie Rieger

Stephanie details all the things we have to know about when designing for today’s broad range of devices: performance, capabilities, form factor, pixel density, and network latency.

These are all good points but I worry that if we just concentrate on the current device landscape, our processes won’t adapt to the future.

The change you want to see

A little while back, Andy wrote:

Even if you happen to be a genius in the waiting, there are no svengalis to pluck you from obscurity and put you on the pedestal you know you deserve. … So if you want to contribute to articles, write books and speak at conferences, you’re the only person in the way.

You can contribute to A List Apart. You can write for Smashing Magazine. You can also put a resource written in HTML at your own URL that is retrievable via HTTP …write a blog post, in other words.

If you prefer dead trees, you no longer need a publishing house. Lulu, MagCloud, Newspaper Club …you have incredible resources at your fingertips.

Move The Web Forward is a guide to help web workers of any skill level contribute to web standards.

JSConf is looking for speakers. You have until January 15th to fill in this form and step up to the plate.

The Industry Conference is looking for speakers. Here’s the form for you to fill in.

In a few days it will be a new year. Traditionally this is a time of resolutions and vows of self-betterment. If you were planning on making any kind of resolution related to contributing to the web community, I hope that you’ll find some of these links useful.

And if you choose to ignore these links, that’s fine. But then if at any time in the new year you find yourself kvetching about articles or talks from “the same old faces” …physician, heal thyself.

Leaving Old Internet Explorer Behind — Joni Korpi

Joni points out a great advantage to the mobile-first approach if you choose not to polyfill for legacy versions of IE: you can go crazy with all sorts of CSS3 goodies in the stylesheet you pull in with media queries.

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

A Responsive Design Approach for Complex, Multicolumn Data Tables | Filament Group, Inc., Boston, MA

A really nice pattern for data tables in responsive designs. Just as with conditional loading, the key point is making a distinction between essential and optional content.

Bullshit – Marco.org

Everyone has their bullshit. You can simply decide whose you’re willing to tolerate.

One Cut - jonronson’s Space

This is one of the best pieces of journalism I’ve read …and it just happens to be posted on a blog. Please read it, particularly if you are a voter in the UK.

The ‘trouble’ with Android | Stephanie Rieger

Stephanie focuses on Android but this is a cautionary tale about trying to impose control over what you’re sending to the multitude of mobile devices out there.

Designing to fixed screen sizes is in fact never a good idea…there is just too much variation, even amongst ‘popular’ devices.

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

Retreat 4 Geeks 2012

As the year draws to a close, I find myself casting an eye back on the past twelve months. There are two events that stand out for me:

I learned a lot at both events. I think there’s enormous benefit in getting together with your peers for days of intense geekery—it’s quite the learning experience.

Looking ahead to next year, there’s one more such event on the horizon.

Aaron started up Retreats 4 Geeks last year and kicked it off with an outstanding week in the woods with Eric. From March 25th to 30th Aaron and I will be leading Retreat 4 Geeks on Progressive Enhancement. Here’s the best bit: it’ll be taking place on a horse ranch in Clark, Colorado.

I’m expecting an intense three days of hands-on coding bookended with some fun outdoor activities. Based on my experiences this year with these kinds of in-depth, focused gatherings, I think it’s going to be pretty special.

If that sounds like something you’d like to be a part of, you can register your place now. Everything—except your airfare—is included: excellent food, luxurious lodging and multiple days of learning and practicing progressive enhancement and mobile-first responsive design. And if you need any assistance in convincing your boss to fork out for the event, there’s a handy factsheet you can download, print out and leave in convenient spots around the office.

So …maybe I’ll see you in the Rockies?

Dot-dash-diss: The gentleman hacker’s 1903 lulz - tech - 27 December 2011 - New Scientist

Before there was phone phreaking there was …radio interception hacking?

A century ago, one of the world’s first hackers used Morse code insults to disrupt a public demo of Marconi’s wireless telegraph

Tuesday, December 27th, 2011

Predicting the Future of Computing - Interactive Feature - NYTimes.com

An interactive timeline where we, the wise crowd, can add our predictions (although the timeline for the past, showing important technological breakthroughs, is bizarrely missing Cooke and Wheatsone’s telegraph).

São Paulo No Logo - a set on Flickr

Photographs showing the “before” and “after” of São Paulo’s astonishing Clean City act banning all outdoor advertising.

IMG_6091

Elite - Cobra Mk III

Rendered in canvas by the reverend Dan Catt. Now I really want to play Elite.

Buxton Collection

Bill Buxton’s collection of input devices going back thirty years.

What’s on the Menu? Help transcribe The New York Public Library’s historical menu collection

This is like Zooniverse’s Old Weather project, but for restaurant menus: help transcribe thousands of restaurant menus going back to the 1940s.

Monday, December 26th, 2011

Confusion over HTML5 & WAI-ARIA | Karl Groves

This helps to clarify the difference between native semantics and ARIA additions.

Is the web dead?

View source.

Sunday, December 25th, 2011

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Anatomy Of An Idea

Steven Johnson describes the beautifully chaotic way that ideas collide and coalesce. Oh, and this bit…

Listening to Cerf talk about the origins of the Internet — and thinking about the book project — made me wonder who had actually come up with the original idea for a decentralized network. So that day, I tweeted out that question, and instantly got several replies. One of those Twitter replies pointed to a Wired interview from a decade ago with Paul Baran, the RAND researcher who was partially responsible for the decentralized design.

That reply on Twitter was from me!

British Sea Power

Oh, this is good! British Sea Power are doing a monthly residency at The Haunt in Brighton. I’ve got my ticket for the first show.

The Star Wars Holiday Special | magazine | Vanity Fair

Add this one to your Instapaper/Readability queue: the behind-the-scenes story of the train wreck that was the 1978 Star Wars Holiday Special.

Saturday, December 24th, 2011

iWish

Dear Apple Claus,

I’ve been a very good boy this year so I hope you don’t me asking for a little present. What I’d really like for Christmas is for you to fix that strange orientation scaling bug in Mobile Safari.

Just in case you’ve forgotten about it, my friend Scott—who has been a very, very good boy this year (what with that whole Boston Globe thing)—put together a test page quite a while back to demonstrate the problem.

Basically, if I set meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0" then it means a pixel should be equal to a pixel: in portrait view, the width should be 320 pixels; in landscape view the width should be 480 pixels. But in Mobile Safari, if I move from portrait to landscape, the width jumps to a value larger than 480 pixels, which means the hapless user must double tap to bring the scale down to 1:1.

Now, admittedly, I could just set meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width" and leave it at that (or I could additionally declare minimum-scale=1.0). But then when the user changes from portrait to landscape, although it doesn’t have the same over-zooming behaviour, it does scale up. That means I’m not getting the full 480 pixels (it’s effectively still a 320 pixel wide display, even in landscape).

I could make the bug disappear by adding maximum-scale=1.0 or user-scaleable=no but that’s the cure that kills the patient. I also did some hacking with Shi Chuan but what we come up with still feels fairly clunky.

So that’s why I’m writing to you, Father Applemas. Won’t you fix this bug for me?

My friend PPK thinks you won’t fix this bug because it would trigger a reflow (and repaint) of the page …but I know that can’t be the reason because the bug doesn’t occur when going from landscape to portrait!

Also—and this is the really strange part—If I’m looking at a web page on my iPhone/Pod in a custom browser (like the Twitter app), rather than using Mobile Safari, then the bug doesn’t occur.

I don’t get, Apple Claus. Why have one behaviour for webviews in other people’s apps and a different behaviour for your own app?

Anyway, if you could see your way to granting this boy’s wish, it would make for a webby Christmas.

Hugs and kisses,

Jeremy

P.S. By this time next year, it would be lovely to have access to the camera (and other device APIs) from the browser …but I’m getting ahead of myself.

Update: the bug has been fixed in iOS 6.

REDbot: <>

Oh, this is very handy indeed: a quick lint tool for HTTP so you can see what kind of headers are being sent. There’s a bookmarklet in the footer too.

Friday, December 23rd, 2011

WORLDMOON

A masterplan for the moon as a global cemetery. Launch the ashes of your loved ones to the moon (leaving the buckyball container in lunarstationary orbit). Given enough ashes and enough buckyballs, the result is a fertile surface and a atmosphere-trapping layer of fullerine. Terraforming via recycled humans.

Or, if that’s too long-term for you, you can buy a scale-model moon jewel.

Where do Websites go to Die? « dpr-barcelona

Burying physical copies of dead websites in a Croatian cave.

Rebecca Cottrell » Where visual design fits in a design process

I think Rebecca is on to something here. Everyone has been so quick to self-identify as a UX designer while marginalising visual design as a purely surface-level layer …but it’s all part of the design process.

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

Huffduffer | Joel Housman

Another satisfied convert to the world of huffduffing, Joel has written some very kind words about the site.

Interestingly, the fact that Huffduffer is free worries him. In this case his fears are unwarranted but it’s a legitimate worry with free services: what if it gets bought out and shut down?

3D Printing, Teleporters and Wishes - Anil Dash

Anil shares his thoughts on where there’s room for improvement in 3D printing, or as he calls it, teleporting.

Douchey Account Guy

It’s funny and heartbreaking because it’s true.

How To Build a Modern Website in 2011 - Tom Milway - Blog

A good round-up of what web development means today …and what web developers need to do to keep pace.

Typography Effects with CSS3 and jQuery

Most of these are pretty over the top but they’re good proofs of concept.

The last show of the year

I flew out to San Francisco last week for An Event Apart. This was the final event (apart) of the year so it was something of a bittersweet affair. This year the line-up for AEA was—with some minor modifications—consistent from city to city:

  1. Seattle
  2. Boston
  3. Atlanta
  4. Minneapolis
  5. Washington DC
  6. San Francisco

It was like a travelling roadshow, a carnival of web geekery. Next year’s AEA line-up will be very different from city to city, showcasing lots of new speakers, so last week’s San Francisco gig felt like the last concert of a tour before the band breaks up.

Well, we went out with a bang. It was a great conference. But then, every AEA this year has been pretty great (see my account from Boston, for example). I saw so many great presentations and met so many lovely people.

Me and Anton Chloe and me An Event Apart Hanging out with Tessa at the back of the room Me and Jason Media Temple party Me and Jason Fyza and me

With An Event Apart San Francisco falling in December, I was able to extend my travel time into a Christmas-time trip to Jessica’s family in Arizona …but not before spending a week in San Francisco.

I love that town. Admittedly that might be because there’s so many people I know that live there but it’s just a fun place to be a tourist. Coffee at Four Barrel, a Mission burrito, coffee at Blue Bottle, pizza in North Beach, beers at Toronado, wine-tasting in Napa—and all of it culminating in a once-in-a-lifetime trip to The French Laundry.

I put together a Map Tale of my trip, which turned out to be a great way of jotting down my experiences at the end of each day (or at the start of the next day if the day’s exertions proved too much).

Heaven Devoid of Stars – a tale of cross-browser kerning | Clagnut § Browsers · Typography · CSS techniques

Richard dives into the differences in how browsers handle kerning. Be sure to click through to the beautiful finished result.

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

Support Vs Optimization | Brad Frost Web

Brad is on a roll. He knocks it out of the park again, this time talking about the difference between supporting the huge range of mobile browsers out there compared to trying to optimise for them.

Position: fixed revisited - QuirksBlog

PPK tests the various ways that mobile browsers handle position:fixed, complete with videos.

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

The Icon Handbook | The Hickensian | Hicksdesign

Jon gives us a run-through on what to expect from his new book. I’ve had a sneak peek and it looks amazing—I can’t wait to get my hands on a copy.

Film on Paper

A blog that takes a detailed look at the art of the film poster.

Friday, December 16th, 2011

The mobile app is going the way of the CD-ROM: To the dustbin of history | VentureBeat

Some future-friendly musings on mobile from Mozilla and Yahoo.

Designers, what’s the rush? | Normative - Design for Devices and the Web

A plea for more time.

We tend to think in 2 to 5 year scales, maybe we need to be thinking in longer time lines about our own careers and skills.

Mobile content strategy link-o-rama 2011 « Karen McGrane

A great round-up of links and posts relating to the increasingly-important role of content strategy and structured content in our multi-device, responsively-designed online world.

yongfook - Design is Horseshit!

There’s a good point buried in this tirade.

Here’s a more positive spin: with this much horseshit, there’s gotta be a horse in there somewhere.

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011

Cross-stitch iPhone case #2 - Jane Dallaway

A brilliantly cool handmade iPhone case by Jane.

Design Principles // Speaker Deck

The slides from my presentation at this year’s An Event Apart. Such a fantastic event …it was an honour to be on the roster.

HTML5 and CSS3 Advent 2011

Here’s a geek advent calendar I missed. There are some great CSS techniques here.

inessential.com: Apps and web apps and the future

Brent Simmons follows up on that Dave Winer post with some future-friendly thoughts:

If I had to choose one or the other — if I had some crazy power but I had to wipe out either native apps or web apps — I’d wipe out native apps. (While somehow excluding browsers, text editors, outliners, web servers, and all those apps we need to make web apps.)

That’s not the case, though. Nothing has to get wiped out.

I think instead that we’ll see a more tangled future. Native apps will use HTML, CSS, and JavaScript more. Web apps will appear more often on smart phones as launchable apps.

Scripting News: Why apps are not the future

Spot. On.

The great thing about the web is linking. I don’t care how ugly it looks and how pretty your app is, if I can’t link in and out of your world, it’s not even close to a replacement for the web. It would be as silly as saying that you don’t need oceans because you have a bathtub.

An open letter to Arran Ross-Paterson : Cennydd Bowles

Cennydd is a gent, slow to anger. So it took a lot to get him wound up enough to write about this issue. I’m glad he did.

Tuesday, December 13th, 2011

Polyfilling The HTML5 Gaps With JavaScript

An in-depth look at browser polyfills: what they are, how they work, and how you can make your own.

The Mobile Case for Progressive Enhancement | Brad Frost Web

A great, great reminder from Brad on the importance of progressive enhancement especially on mobile. There seems to be a real mindset amongst developers working on mobile sites that JavaScript is a requirement for building anything (and there’s a corresponding frustration with the wildly-varying levels of JavaScript support). It ain’t necessarily so!

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

Jeremy Keith - There Is No Mobile Web - BD Conf, Sept 2011 on Vimeo

The video of the opening keynote I delivered at the Breaking Development conference in Nashville earlier this year. It expands on the One Web presentation I gave at DIBI, focusing on the language we use to talk about our approaches to web development.

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

One week of Map Tales

It’s been just a week since Clearleft unveiled the Map Tales project that we built at Hackfarm and there have already been some great stories told with the site.

Paul documented his 2009 road trip to South by Southwest.

Alessio put together a photographic guide to his adopted home, showing the secrets of Barcelona.

Andy told two tales of two different trips: wine-tasting in California’s Dry Creek Valley and hanging with the hipsters in East London.

Fellow Brightonian Tom Prior has recreated the story of the famous Stirling Moss victory at the 1955 Mille Miglia, the legendary open-road endurance race in Northern Italy.

I love the simplicity of Oliver and Peter Walk to School that Peter Ruk has embedded on his site—beautifully simple .

I’ve made a map tale of the voyage of The Beagle with material fromAboutDarwin.com.

Meanwhile Anna is putting together the tale of the Terra Nova expedition to the South Pole because—get this—a relative of hers was part of Scott’s team!

There’s plenty of room for improvement with Map Tales. It would be nice to have customisation options at some point—colours, fonts, maybe even map tiles. Some narratives would probably work better with aerial imagery, for example. In fact, that’s something that Andy has been tirelessly tinkering with. To get a taste of how that looks, check out Britain From Above, the epic map tale of the 2008 BBC documentary series.

Simon Collison | Colly | Journal | My digital preservation utopia

Colly’s thoughts on digital preservation are written in a lighthearted tongue-in-cheek way but at least he’s thinking about it. That alone gives me comfort.

Don’t Be A Free User (Pinboard Blog)

Maciej delivers a rant worthy of Paul Robert Lloyd.

That “JavaScript not available” case | Christian Heilmann

A great reminder from Christian that making JavaScript a requirement for using a website just doesn’t make much sense.

Monday, December 5th, 2011

Silicon Valley Buzz - Science for the everyday man - YouTube

Ariel is interviewed by Seth Shostak. Science! Science! Science!

Shimizu’s Dream - Shimizu Corporation

Among the proposed projects from the Shimizu corporation are a space hotel, giant lakes in the desert, and a ring around the moon to harness solar energy.

Sunday, December 4th, 2011

iOS scale bug stays (mostly) « « David Goss David Goss

Well, this is very intriguing: it turns out that the infamous orientation/scale bug in Mobile Safari isn’t present in in-app browsers (UIWebView). Most odd.

We Are Historians | 1sixty

A beautiful reminder that by publishing on the web, we are all historians.

Every color you choose and line of code you write is a reflection of you; not just as a human being in this world, but as a human being in this time and place in human history. Inside each project is a record of the styles and fashions you value, the technological advancements being made in the industry, the tone of your voice, and even the social and economic trends around you.

Rhizome | She Was A Camera

Remembering the camgirl community.

astronautdinosaur.com

Ballardian astronaut paintings by Scott Listfield.

The forgotten house

The Never Forgotten House is a beautifully-written piece with a central premise that is utterly, utterly flawed. Once again the truism that “the internet never forgets” is presented as though it needed no verification.

Someday soon, the internet will fulfill its promise as a time machine. It will provide images for every space and moment so we can fact check our memories. Flickr and Facebook albums will only accumulate.

Citation needed. Badly.

Read the article. Enjoy it. But question its unquestioningness. It made me sad for exactly the opposite reasons that the author intended.

Every essential moment of a child’s life is documented if he was born in the West. With digital album after album for every birthday, every Christmas, he will never struggle to remember what his childhood home looked like.

I wish that were true.

ART LIES | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

James Bridle in untrue art exposé: read all about it!

The comments are simply epic.

ART LIES

Saturday, December 3rd, 2011

Future Drama

Past predictions of the future in concept videos.

inessential.com: The Readable Future

Brent Simmons writes about the desire of regular web users—not just the geeks—to have a comfortable reading experience. Publishers ignore this at their peril.

Friday, December 2nd, 2011

Clean conditional loading

It’s December. That means it’s time for the geek advent calendars to get revved up again:

For every day until Christmas Eve, you can find a tasty geek treat on each of those sites.

Today’s offering on 24 Ways is a little something I wrote called Conditional Loading for Responsive Designs. It expands on the technique I’m using on Huffduffer to conditionally load inessential content into a sidebar with Ajax where the layout is wide enough to accommodate it:

if (document.documentElement.clientWidth > 640) {
// Use Ajax to retrieve content here.
}

In that example, the Ajax only kicks in if the viewport is wider than 640 pixels. Assuming I’ve got a media query that also kicks in at 640 pixels, everything is hunky-dory.

But …it doesn’t feel very to have that 640 pixel number repeated in two places: once in the CSS and again in the JavaScript. It feels particularly icky if I’m using ems for my media query breakpoints (as I often do) while using pixels in JavaScript.

At my recent responsive enhancement workshop in Düsseldorf, Andreas Nebiker pointed out an elegant solution: instead of testing the width of the viewport in JavaScript, why not check for a style change that would have been executed within a media query instead?

So, say for example I’ve got some CSS like this:

@media all and (min-width: 640px) {
    [role="complementary"] {
        width: 30%;
        float: right;
    }
}

Then in my JavaScript I could test to see if that element has the wide-screen layout or not:

var sidebar = document.querySelector('[role="complementary"]'),
floating = window.getComputedStyle(sidebar,null).getPropertyValue('float');
if (floating == 'right') {
// Use Ajax to retrieve content here.
}

Or something like that. The breakpoint is only ever specified once so I ever change it from 640 pixels to something else (like 40 ems) then I only have to make that change in one place. Feel free to grab the example and play around with it.

By the way, you’ll notice that in the original 24 Ways article and also in this updated example, I’m only testing the layout on page load, not on page resize. It would be fairly easy to add in an onResize test as well, but I’m increasingly coming to the conclusion that—apart from the legitimate case of orientation change on tablets—the only people resizing their browser windows after the page loads are web designers testing responsive designs. Still, it would be nice to get some more data to test that hypothesis.

InstaCSS | Instant CSS Documentation Search

A fantastically useful resource! Don’t let the name fool you: this provides instant access to documentation for CSS and HTML and JavaScript!

Put this one on speed dial.

Conditional Loading for Responsive Designs

This article first appeared in 24 Ways, the online advent calendar for geeks.

Thursday, December 1st, 2011

Hackfarming Map Tales

I had a good productive Responsive Enhancement workshop in Düsseldorf and Marc was an excellent host. But alas, I couldn’t stick around for the rest of the Beyond Tellerrand conference which was, by all accounts, excellent.

I made my way back to the UK post-haste and started playing rail parkour to get across the country to Herefordshire. There lies The Colloquy—the rural but very comfy location for Clearleft’s week of hacking in the countryside.

Casing out the joint

Hackfarm HQ In front of Hackfarm HQ

We called it Hackfarm. The idea was pretty straightforward. For one week we would sequester ourselves in a farmhouse (admittedly it was a farmhouse with a jacuzzi), decide on A Thing to build and then …build it.

Max and Mike graciously agreed to join us with their considerable dev talents. Jessica also joined us, rising to the considerable challenge of catering for a dozen people.

Planning the heist

We didn’t know what we were going to build, ‘though some people had some ideas. We spent the first evening listening to those ideas, discussing them and voting on them until we came to an agreement and decided what the project would be. The next morning, Hackfarm began in earnest.

Part of Hackfarm’s raison d’être was to try out some new things. In that spirit, Andy introduced to and we gave it a whirl.

Everyone got involved in the design process, splitting into ad-hoc groups to figure out personas, generate user stories and sketch interface ideas. It was equal parts hard work and really good fun.

The caper

As the ideas solidified, we shifted to our laptops, firing up graphics programmes and text editors, ready to get down to some building. Again, collaboration was the key. Developers and designers sat down together, pushing pixels and cranking out code.

Andy about to drink the Bloody Mary that Paul made Hacking in the kitchen Discussion Hacking

By the end of the week we had a working website.

The reveal

It’s called Map Tales. It’s a tool to help people tell stories illustrated with maps.

Now there are plenty of map-based narratives out there on the web but many of them suffer from what Schuyler Erle calls red dot fever: a bunch of points shown on a map all at once. One of the design principles that emerged early on at Hackfarm was that the map was secondary to narrative. When you’re reading a story in a book, you don’t know where the next chapter will take you.

Compare this Google Maps narrative with the corresponding Map Tale.

It’s a simple narrative device but it adapts well to stories of all sizes. Rich put together a Mediterranean-spanning Map Tale for The Odyssey while I documented the tale of recreating shots from The Matrix in their filming locations in downtown Sydney.

The site went live on the last full day of Hackfarm but we’ve kept it quiet ‘till now while we sorted out some of the rough edges. I’ve been tweaking the small screen styles a bit while Andy has been working like crazy to finesse the tale creation process.

I know I’m biased but I really, really like Map Tales. I like that it allows anyone to tell a story and then share it or embed it on their own website. I like that doesn’t require any kind of sign-up or log-in process (you get a secret URL for every tale you create that allows you to go back and edit it). I like that it isn’t trying to be another social network.

And I really, really, really like the people who made this. I count myself very fortunate indeed to work with such a great group of smart and talented friends.

Dinner Lunch Dinner Champagne

Occupy George

A stroke of genius: turning money itself into the carrier for infographics on wealth distribution in America.

Athena - MediaWiki

Documentation of an ongoing project to create a mobile-first responsive MediaWiki theme.