Archive: April 17th, 2013

CRAPCHA: Completely Ridiculous And Phony Captcha that Hassles for Amusement

These seem just about as reasonable as any other CAPTCHA.

A dao revisited

Pretty much every time I give a talk—be it on progressive enhancement, responsive design, or web development in general—I almost always make reference to John’s A Dao Of Web Design. Invariably, I ask for a show of hands: “Who’s read this article?” I ask. I try not to get too dispirited when only a few hands go up. Instead I encourage everyone—in the strongest possible terms—to seek it out and read it.

It’s not just that I consider A Dao Of Web Design to be part of the canon of great writing and thinking for web designers and developers. I’m also continually amazed by its longevity. Thirteen years is a very, very long time on the web, and yet just last week Richard referenced John’s article when he was describing how best to approach designing for the web today.

The only other article I can think that matches its importance is Ethan’s unveiling of Responsive Web Design three years ago, also on A List Apart. It’s no coincidence that Ethan’s article references John’s article from a decade before. Both pieces are essentially making the same rallying cry: stop fighting the flexible nature of the web. Embrace it.

I think that finally, finally we’re beginning to do just that.

MATTER and Medium

The news is finally public: Bobbie’s Matter has been bought my Ev’s Medium. Fingers crossed that they don’t fuck it up.

Responsive workshopping

I spent most of last week up in Greenwich for this year’s UX London. ‘Twas a most excellent event. The move to the new venue gave the whole event a much more fun vibe and the format of a morning of talks followed by an afternoon of workshops was perfect.

Andy did a great job curating the line-up. It had a bit of a dConstruct-y feel, and not just because we had old friends like Marty, Peter, and Hannah back: Genevieve Bell, Simone Rebaudengo and Richard Seymour all broke our brains in different wonderful ways.

Hats off to Kate who worked her ass off to make sure that everything ran smoothly. Seriously, you wouldn’t believe the amount of work she did. The change of venue and format for this year resulted in at least twice as much work as usual.

In the middle of UX London’s three days, I ran a workshop called Responsive UX. As I told the audience that morning when I was pitching the workshop, I got the title by taking the term “responsive design” and doing a find-and-replace on the word “design” with the phrase “UX”. After all, what’s the difference? Right, Peter?

Seriously though, this workshop was a little different in that I wasn’t covering any HTML or CSS or JavaScript. It was much more about planning for the unknown and good ol’-fashioned content priority and hierarchy.

I wasn’t entirely pleased with how it went. It was a workshop of two halves. The first half had far too much of me talking (and ranting), probably preaching to the choir. But I felt I had to lay the groundwork first. The second half—when everybody got hands on with paper-based exercises—was much better.

I learned my lesson: show, don’t tell. I’ll be doing a full day responsive workshop at Ampersand in June. I plan to make sure that there’s less of me talking and more making and collaborating. Also, because it’s a full day, I’ll be able to get down to the nitty-gritty of markup and style sheets.

And don’t forget; if you want me to come to your company sometime and do a workshop there, no problemo.

Some people at the workshop asked about me publishing my slides. The slides by themselves really don’t contain much information but I’ve published them on Speakerdeck anyway. But what’s more valuable are the URLs to articles and resources I mentioned along the way. So here’s the structure of the workshop together with links to examples and further reading…

Introduction

Myths

Progressive Enhancement

Planning

Conditional Loading

Visual Design

Navigation