Archive: May, 2014

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Saturday, May 31st, 2014

Re-watching Battlestar Galactica.

Episode three of season three is still the biggest nerdgasm since the ride of the Rohirrim.

Out for Dim Sum with @WordRidden and @Anna_Debenham.

Powerful Ideas Need Love Too!

Alan Kay’s written remarks to a Joint Hearing of the Science Committee and the Economic and Educational and Opportunites Committee in October 1995.

Friday, May 30th, 2014

Had a great @SalterCane band practice with our new drummer Emily.

The internet is down at @Clearleft Towers. It’s just like Hack Farm.

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

Playing around in canvas. @seb_ly would be proud.

How We Got To Now with Steven Johnson - YouTube

Steven Johnson’s new television series will be shown on BBC in a few months time. Looks like it’s going to be good Burkian fun.

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014

Beats by Deirdre.

Attention designers and developers: more tickets have become available for responsiveconf.com:

https://ti.to/clearleft/responsiveconf2

The more the merrier at Responsive Day Out 2

It’s just a little over four weeks until Responsive Day Out 2: Revenge Of The Width.

The final piece of the line-up has just dropped into place. Dan Donald will be joining us to talk about pushing the browser to achieve what the standards bodies are dragging their heels on. I’m very much looking forward to hearing what he has to share, just as I’m looking forward to hearing all the talks.

I’ve been liaising with each of the speakers to figure out the best way to craft a structured flow for the day. I’m positively giddy with anticipation now. Every one of the talks sounds like a valuable nugget of winningness.

I have some more Responsive Day Out news…

If you already have your ticket, great! I’ll see you on June 27th.

If you don’t already have your ticket, despair not! I’ve been working with the people at the venue to figure out a way of getting some more seats into the venue and I’m happy to report that we’ve been able to expand the capacity.

So grab your ticket now for the bargain price of just £80 plus VAT. They’re aren’t many extra tickets and they probably won’t last too long so get in there.

Couldn’t sleep last night.

I blame the super-Eddington event from Andromeda.

Stupid neighbours, gamma-ray bursting at all hours.

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

Dystopia Tracker

Documenting depictions of dystopian futures and tracking which ideas are turning out to be predictions.

Reminiscing about @dConstruct events past:

http://adactio.com/journal/6808/

…and getting very excited about http://2014.dconstruct.org

Ten years of dConstruct

Tickets for dConstruct 2014 have been on sale for just over a week now. If you haven’t nabbed yours yet, here’s the URL:

ti.to/clearleft/dconstruct-2014

This will be the tenth dConstruct. Ten years! It’s pretty crazy to look back through the archive and see how the event has evolved from its humble beginnings in 2005 to last year’s magnificent tour-de-force.

If you missed out last year, the videos are all online. You can watch the talks by Sarah Angliss, Maciej Cegłowski, Dan Williams and all the other terrific presenters.

And after you’ve done that, book your place in the Brighton Dome for Friday, September 5th, 2014. Believe me, you don’t want to miss out on this year’s event.

Ten years! Crazy.

It’s kind of fun to look back at the themes for each year:

Known: taking a big bet on the #indieweb

When I’ve been banging on at conferences about digital preservation, personal publishing and the indie web, I’ve been at pains to point out that there are huge opportunities here for startups looking to build valet services to help people publish on their own domain.

Ben and Erin at Known are doing just that, with some backing from KQED, PRX and the Knight Foundation instead of the usual short-sighted Silicon Valley venture capitalism.

One of the jobs of a startup is to look at where the world is going, extrapolating from current trends and domain knowledge, and meet a future need with a product at exactly the right time. We think the time is right for an independent web that is owned by content creators and readers alike.

Sitting in a noodle café in Brighton, reading through A History Of The Future In 100 Objects on my phone.

Feels like Bladerunner-on-sea.

Really pleased to announce that @hereinthehive will be speaking at Responsive Day Out 2: The Squishening.

http://responsiveconf.com/

Interrupting my walk into work to call the emergency services after witnessing a car crash.

Luckily no one was hurt.

After a long weekend of coding, I’ve got a brand new section on my website.

http://adactio.com/notes/

Monday, May 26th, 2014

Indie Tech Summit - Brighton, UK - July 4th, 2014

I’ll be speaking at this event that Aral is putting on here in Brighon on the fourth of July (independence day — geddit?).

Selfish publishing

I was in Düsseldorf last week, alas just a little too late to catch any of the talks at Beyond Tellarrand …which is a shame, because it looks like Maciej’s talk was terrific. Fortunately, I did get to see a lot of people who were in town for the event, and myself and Maciej were both participating in Decentralize Camp the day after Beyond Tellerrand.

Decentralize Camp had a surprisingly broad scope. As Maciej pointed out during his presentation, there are many different kinds of decentralization.

For my part, I was focusing specifically on the ideas of the indie web. I made it very clear from the outset that was my own personal take. A lot of it was, unsurprisingly, rooted in my relentless obsession with digital preservation and personal publishing. I recapped some of what I talked about at last year’s Beyond Tellerrand before showing some specific examples of the indie web at work: IndieAuth, webmentions, etc.

I realised that my motivations were not only personal, but downright selfish. For me, it’s all about publishing to my own site. That attitude was quite different to many of the other technologies being discussed; technologies that explicitly set out to empower other people and make the world a better place.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I must admit that one of the reasons why I write and talk about the indie web is that in the back of my mind, I’m hoping others will be encouraged to publish on their own websites instead of (or as well as) giving their creative work to third-party sites. As I’ve said before:

…on today’s web of monolithic roach-motel silos like Facebook and Twitter, I can’t imagine a more disruptive act than choosing to publish on your own website.

That said, I’m under no illusions that my actions will have any far-reaching consequences. This isn’t going to change the world. This isn’t going to empower other people (except maybe people who already tech-savvy enough to empower themselves). I’m okay with that.

At Decentralize Camp, I helped Michiel B. de Jong to run a session on IndieMark, a kind of tongue-in-cheek gamification of indie web progress. It was fun. And that’s an important factor to remember in all this. In fact, it’s one of the indie web design principles:

Have fun. Remember that GeoCities page you built back in the mid-90s? The one with the Java applets, garish green background and seventeen animated GIFs? It may have been ugly, badly coded and sucky, but it was fun, damnit. Keep the web weird and interesting.

During the session, someone asked why they hadn’t heard of all this indie web stuff before. After all, if the first indie web camp happened in 2011, shouldn’t it be bigger by now?

That’s when I realised that I honestly didn’t care. I didn’t care how big (or small) this group is. For me, it’s just a bunch of like-minded people helping each other out. Even if nobody else ever turns up, it still has value.

I have to admit, I really don’t care that much about the specific technologies being discussed at indie web camps: formats, protocols, bits of code …they are less important than the ideas. And the ideas are less important than the actions. As long as I’m publishing to my website, I’m pretty happy. That said, I’m very grateful that the other indie web folks are there to help me out.

Mostly though, my motivations echo Mandy’s:

No one owns this domain but me, and no one but me can take it down. I will not wake up one morning to discover that my service has been “sunsetted” and I have some days or weeks to export my data (if I have that at all). These URLs will never break.

The Internet With A Human Face - Beyond Tellerrand 2014 Conference Talk

The transcript of Maciej’s talk from Beyond Tellerrand on how the web has become more and more centralised:

The degree of centralization is remarkable. Consider that Google now makes hardware, operating systems, and a browser.

It’s not just possible, but fairly common for someone to visit a Google website from a Google device, using Google DNS servers and a Google browser on the way.

This is a level of of end-to-end control that would have caused us to riot in the streets if Microsoft had attempted it in 1999. But times have changed.

Saturday, May 24th, 2014

Archeology, Anthropology, and Interstellar Communication edited by Douglas A. Vakoch

A free PDF download from NASA on all things SETI, specifically the challenges of interspecies interstellar communication.

For the Love of the URL — Aaron Grando

Some URLs are ugly. Some URLs aren’t. Let’s not sacrifice them.

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

It’s OK not to use tools by Jonas Downey of Basecamp

Today, a basic HTML/CSS site seems almost passé. But why? Is it because our new tools are so significantly better, or because we’ve gone overboard complicating simple things?

He’s right, y’know.

Monday, May 19th, 2014

Roll Your Own Podcast Feed with Huffduffer by Adam Stahr

A quick little introduction to Huffduffer.

Saturday, May 17th, 2014

Single Element CSS Spinners

A lovely little selection of loading indicators powered by CSS animations and transitions.

Friday, May 16th, 2014

dConstruct tickets

Tickets for dConstruct 2014 go on sale on Monday morning at 11am.

I expect there’ll be quite a rush for tickets initially, but don’t worry—if you aren’t able to get to an internet-enabled device to secure your place the moment that tickets go on sale, rest assured that there’ll be tickets available for quite a while. For the past few years, there have been tickets still available right up until a month before the event itself.

That said, you might as well grab your ticket straight away. You definitely don’t want to miss this year’s event. Just look at that amazing line-up.

Oh, and that line-up just got a little bit more amazing. I’m pleased as punch to announce that Jen Lowe will be joining us for dConstruct. Just one more brilliant and talented person to add to the roster of brilliant and talented people who are going to make this year’s dConstruct something else.

If you’re travelling from outside Brighton, then the first thing you might want to do after securing your dConstruct ticket is to find some accommodation. Here’s a dConstruct page on AirBnB listing plenty of available lodgings.

I recommend sticking around for the weekend after dConstruct too. As well as the annual Maker Faire and the Brighton and Hove Food Festival, there’s going to be plenty of other events happening under the banner of the Brighton Digital Festival.

Brighton is definitely the place to be in the first week of September.

And the dConstruct ticket page is definitely the place to be on Monday morning.

(One thing to note: if you’re buying a whole bunch of tickets for your workmates, please make sure to add a name for each ticket. Don’t worry; you’ll be able to update the names on the tickets at any time up ‘till a couple of weeks before the event itself. So even if you’re not sure now who the final attendees will turn out to be, you can adjust the tickets once you figure it out. But you can’t leave the names blank—if you do, I’m afraid the whole order will be cancelled.)

Frank Chimero – Only Openings

I guess it goes without saying at this point, but this piece from Frank is beautiful and thought-provoking.

This part in particular touched on some things I’ve been thinking about lately:

Design’s golden calf is simplicity. Speaking as someone who sees, makes, and uses design each and every day, I am tired of simple things. Simple things are weak. They are limited. They are boring. What I truly want is clarity. Give me clear and evident things over simple things. Make me things that presume and honor my intelligence. Shun seamlessness. It is another false token. Make me things that are full of seams, because if you give me a seam and I pull the thread, I get to see how the whole world is stitched together. Give me some credit. Show me you trust me.

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

Inexhaustible - Instapaper Fragmentions by Brian Donohue

Instapaper is going to add support for fragmentions. Seems like a match made in heaven.

Index cards | A Working Library

A truly wonderful piece by Mandy detailing why and how she writes, edits, and publishes on her own website:

No one owns this domain but me, and no one but me can take it down. I will not wake up one morning to discover that my service has been “sunsetted” and I have some days or weeks to export my data (if I have that at all). These URLs will never break.

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

Open-Source Projects by Filament Group

Those smart people at Filament Group have gathered their open-source code into one handy place. Useful!

Ingredients by Mark Boulton

A lovely post by Mark on the value of URLs.

Tim Bray · Pervasive Monitoring Is an Attack

The IETF have decided that network surveillance is damage to be routed around.

Monday, May 12th, 2014

Seams

You can listen to an audio version of Seams.

“The function of science fiction,” said Ray Bradbury, “is not only to predict the future, but to prevent it.”

Dystopias are the default setting for science fiction. It’s rare to find utopian sci-fi, and when you do—as in the post-singularity Culture novels of Iain M.Banks—there’s always more than a germ of dystopia; the dystutopias that Margaret Atwood speaks of.

You’ve got your political dystopias—1984 and all its imitators. Then there’s alien invasion dystopias, machine-intelligence dystopias, and a whole slew of post-apocalyptic dystopias: nuclear war, pandemic disease, environmental collapse, genetic engineering …take your pick. From the cosy catastrophes of John Wyndham to Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, this is the stock and trade of speculative fiction.

Of all these undesirable futures, one that troubles more than any other is the Wall·E dystopia. I’m not talking about the environmental wasteland depicted on Earth. I mean the dystutopia depicted aboard the generation starship The Axiom. Here, humanity’s every need is catered to without requiring any thought. And so humanity atrophies, becoming physically obese and intellectually lazy.

It’s not a new idea. H. G. Wells had already shown us a distant future like this in his classic novel The Time Machine. In the far future of that book’s timeline, humanity splits into two. The savagery of the canabalistic Morlocks is contrasted with the docile passive stupidity of the Eloi, but as Jaron Lanier points out, both endpoints are equally horrific.

In Wall·E, the Eloi have advanced technology. Their technology has been designed according to a design principle enshrined in the title of a Dead Kennedys album: Give Me Convenience Or Give Me Death.

That’s the reason why the Wall·E dystopia disturbs me so much. It’s all-too believable. For many years now, the rallying cry of digital designers has been epitomised by the title of Steve Krug’s terrific book, Don’t Make Me Think. But what happens when that rallying cry is taken too far? What happens when it stops being “don’t make think while I’m trying to complete a task” to simply “don’t make me think” full stop?

Convenience. Ease of use. Seamlessness.

On the face of it, these all seem like desirable traits in digital and physical products alike. But they come at a price. When we design, we try to do the work so that the user doesn’t have to. We do the thinking so the user doesn’t have to. Don’t make the user think. But taken too far, that mindset becomes dangerous.

Marshall McLuhan said that every extension is also an amputution. As we augment the abilities of people to accomplish their tasks, we should be careful not to needlessly curtail what they can do:

Here we are, a society hell bent on extending our reach through phones, through computers, through “seamless integration” and yet all along the way we’re unwittingly losing perhaps as much as we gain. The mediums we create are built to carry out specific tasks efficiently, but by doing so they have a tendency to restrict our options for accomplishing that task by other means. We begin to learn the “One” way to do it, when in fact there are infinite ways. The medium begins to restrict our thinking, our imagination, our potential.

The idea of “seamlessness” as a desirable trait in what we design is one that bothers me. Technology has seams. By hiding those seams, we may think we are helping the end user, but we are also making a conscience choice to deceive them (or at least restrict what they can do).

I see this a lot in the world of web devlopment. We’re constantly faced with challenges like dealing with users on slow networks or small screens. So we try to come up with solutions (bandwidth media queries, responsive images) that have at their heart an assumption that we know better than the end user what they should get.

I’m not saying that everything should be an option in a menu for the user to figure out—picking smart defaults is very much part of our job. But I do think there’s real value in giving the user the final choice.

I remember Jake giving a good example of this. If he’s travelling and he’s on a 3G network on his phone, or using shitty hotel WiFi on his laptop, and someone sends him a link to a video of some cats, he doesn’t mind if he gets the low-quality version as long as he gets to see the feline shenanigans in short order. But if he’s in the same situation and someone sends him a link to the just-released trailer for the new Star Trek movie, he’s willing to wait for hours so that he can watch in high-definition.

That’s a choice. All too often, these kind of choices are pre-made by designers and developers instead of being offered to the end user. We probably mean well, but there’s a real danger in assuming that just because someone is using a particular device that we can infer what their context is:

Mind reading is no way to base fundamental content decisions.

My point is that while we don’t want to overwhelm the user with choice overload, we also need to be careful not to unintentionally remove valuable choices that can empower people. In our quest to make experiences seamless, we run the risk of also making those experiences rigid and inflexible.

The drive for a “seamless experience” has been used to justify some harsh amputations. When Twitter declared war on the very developers it used to champion, and changed its API and terms of service so that tweets had to be displayed the same way everywhere, it was done in the name of “a consistent user experience.” Twitter knows best.

The web is made up of parts and there are seams between those parts: HTML, HTTP, and URLs. The software that can expose or hide those seams is the web browser. Web browsers are made by human beings and it’s the mindset and assumptions of those human beings that determines whether web browsers are enabling or disabling users to make use of those seams.

“View source” is a seam that exposes the HTML lying beneath every web page. That kind of X-ray vision can be quite powerful. Clearly it’s not an important feature for most users, but it is directly responsible for showing people how web pages are made …and intimating that anyone can do it. In the introduction to my first book I thanked “view source” along with my other teachers like Jeff Veen, Steve Champeon, and Jeffrey Zeldman.

These days, browsers don’t like to expose “view source” as easily as they once did. It’s hidden amongst the developer tools. There’s an assumption there that it’s not intended for regular users. The browser makers know best.

There are seams between the technologies that make up a web page: HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. The ability to enable or disable those layers can be empowering. It has become harder and harder to disable JavaScript in the browser. Another little amputation. The browser makers know best.

The CSS that styles web pages can be over-ridden by the end user. This is not a bug. It is a very powerful feature. That feature is being removed:

I understand that vendors can do whatever they want to control how you experience the web, because it is their software, their product, but removing user stylesheets feels sooo un-web to me, which is irony. A browser’s largest responsibility is to give people access to the web. It’s like the web is this open hand, but software is this closed fist.

Then there’s the URL. The ultimate seam.

Historically, browsers have exposed this seam, but now—just as with “view source” and user stylesheets—the visibility of the URL is being relegated to being a power-user tool.

The ultimate amputation.

The irony here is that the justification for this change is not the usual mantra of providing “a more seamless user experience.” Instead, the justification is supposedly security.

This strike me as really strange. Security is the one area where seamlessness is definitely not a desirable characteristic. A secure system requires people to be mindful and aware of their situation. This is certainly true on the web, as Tom points out:

Hiding information away makes me less able to make decisions: it makes me a less informed user.

The whole reason that phishing is a problem is because users don’t pay any bloody attention to what they see in their location bar. Putting less information in the location bar makes the location bar less useful and thus there’s less point paying any attention to it.

Tom has hit on the fundamental mismatch here. Chrome is a piece of software that wants to provide a good user experience—“don’t make me think!”—while at the same trying to make users mindful of their surroundings:

Security requires educated, pro-active, informed thinking users.

Usability is about making the whole process of using the web seamless and thoughtless: a child should be able to do it.

So from the security standpoint, obfuscating the URL is exactly the wrong thing to do.

In order to actually stay safe online, you need to see the “seams” of the web, you need to pay attention, use your brain.

Chrome knows best.

Making it harder to “view source” might seem like an inconsequentail decision. Removing the ability to apply user stylesheets might seem like an inconsequential decision. Heck, even hiding the URL might seem like an inconsequential decision. But each one of those decisions has repercussions. And each one of those decisions reflects an underlying viewpoint.

Make no mistake, all software is political. We talk about opinionated software but really, all software is opinionated, whether we like it or not. Seemingly inconsequential interface decisions are actually reflections of assumptions, biases and beliefs.

As Nat points out, like all political decisions, this is about power:

There’s been much debate about whether the URLs are ‘ugly’ or ‘beautiful’ and whether people really understand them. This debate misses the point.

The URLs are the cornerstone of the interconnected, decentralised web. Removing the URLs from the browser is an attempt to expand and consolidate centralised power.

If that’s the case, then it really doesn’t matter what we think about Chrome removing visible URLs. What appears to be a design decision about the user interface is in fact a manifestation of a much deeper vision. It’s a vision of a future where people can have everything their heart desires without having to expend needless thought. It’s a bright future filled with seamless experiences.

Welcome aboard The Axiom.

Buy n Large knows best.

Friday, May 9th, 2014

N’existe Pas by Bruce Sterling on The Dissident Blog

A short story set in a science-fictional future that just happens to be our present.

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

Singularity&Co. — Save the Scifi!

The campaign to restore out-of-print pulp sci-fi books in electronic formats.

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

Antisocial Networking by Tyler Finck

A decisive Indie Web move:

This site has become the place that I’m ready to host almost everything I make.

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

ntlk’s blog: Chrome obfuscates the URLs, Google benefits

Nat’s take on Chrome’s proposal to bury URLs:

The URLs are the cornerstone of the interconnected, decentralised web. Removing the URLs from the browser is an attempt to expand and consolidate centralised power.

Sunday, May 4th, 2014

Bruce Lawson’s personal site  : Happy Birthday, BASIC

Bruce’s love letter to BASIC.

The closest I’ve ever come to that “a-ha!” moment I had when I first wrote something in BASIC was when I first wrote something in HTML.

Talking and travelling

I’m in America. This is a three-week trip and in those three weeks, I’m speaking at four conferences.

That might sound like a fairly hectic schedule but it’s really not that bad at all. In each place I’m travelling to, travel takes up a day, the conference portion takes up a couple of days, but I still get a day or two to just hang out and be a tourist, which is jolly nice.

This sojourn began in Boston where I was speaking at An Event Apart. It was—as ever—an excellent event and even though I was just speaking at An Event Apart in Seattle just a few weeks ago, there were still plenty of fresh talks for me to enjoy in Boston: Paul talking about performance, Lea talking about colour in CSS, Dan talking about process, and a barnstorming talk from Bruce on everything that makes the web great (although I respectfully disagree with his stance on DRM/EME).

My own talk was called The Long Web and An Event Apart Boston was its final outing. I first gave it at An Event Apart DC back in August—it’s had a good nine-month run.

My next appearance at An Event Apart will be at the end of this American trip in San Diego. I’ll be presenting a new talk there. Whereas my previous talk was a rambling affair about progressive enhancement, responsive design, and long-term thinking, my new talk will be a rambling affair about progressive enhancement, responsive design, and long-term thinking.

Sooner or later people are going to realise that I keep hammering home the same message in all my talks and this whole speaking-at-conferences gig will dry up. Until then, I’ll keep hammering home that same old message.

I have two opportunities to road-test this new talk before An Event Apart San Diego (for which, by the way, tickets still remain: use the code AEAKEITH when you’re booking to get $100 off).

I’ll be speaking at Bmoresponsive in Baltimore at the end of this week. Before that, I have the great pleasure (and pressure) of opening the show tomorrow at the Artifact conference here in good ol’ Austin, Texas (and believe it or not, you can still get a ticket: this time use the code ADACTIO100 when you’re booking to get $100 off).

Until then, I have some time to wander around and be a tourist. It is so nice to be here in Austin when it’s not South by Southwest. I should probably fretting over this talk but instead I’m spending my time sampling tacos and beers in the sunshine.

URLy warning

I’m genuinely shocked that Jake thinks that Chrome hiding URLs is a good thing. On the one hand, he says:

The URL is the share button of the web, and it does that better than any other platform. Linkability and shareability is key to the web, we must never lose that…

I absolutely agree with him there. But I very much disagree when he says:

…and these changes do not lose that.

The method he describes for getting at a URL to share is this:

clicking the origin chip or hitting ⌘-L.

Your average user is no more likely to figure out how to do that then they are to figure out how to view source (something that Chrome buried as a “developer” feature some time ago).

Cennydd recently said of URLs:

I mostly agree with him. The protocol portion of the URL is pretty pointless, and the domain name and TLD are never what I would describe as “beautiful”. No, when I talk about beautiful URLs, I mean the path that comes after the protocol, domain name, and TLD gumpf …the very bit that Chrome is looking to hide.

URLs are universal. They work in Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Internet Explorer, cURL, wget, your iPhone, Android and even written down on sticky notes. They are the one universal syntax of the web. Don’t take that for granted.

URLs are for humans. Design them for humans.

Of course your average user probably won’t even know what a URL is, and nor should they. But they know what a link is. They know that, until now, they could copy the “link” from the top of their browser and paste it into an email, or a text message, or a word processing document.

If this Chrome experiment goes forward, we can kiss all that goodbye.

The security issue that Jake outlines is that browsers need to make the domain name portion of the URL clearly visible. I hope that the smart folks working on Chrome can figure out a way to do that without castrating the browser’s ability to easily share links.

It’s a classic case of:

  1. Something must be done!
  2. This (killing URLs) is something.
  3. Something has been done.

Technically, obfuscating the URL seems to solve the security issue. But technically, decapitation seems to solve a headache.

Saturday, May 3rd, 2014

The Once and Future IndieWeb

Slides from Tantek’s recent talk at Web Directions Code about the Indie Web.

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

Burying the URL - Allen Pike

Right now, this move to remove URLs from the interface of Chrome is just an experiment …but the fact that Google are even experimenting with it is very disturbing.

“Who? Me? No, I was never going to actually blow the web’s brains out—I just wanted to feel the heft of the weapon as I stroked it against the face of the web.”

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

What Comes Next Is the Future by Matt Braun

This has the potential to be a terrific little documentary. What say we get it funded?