Archive: August, 2017 sparkline

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Thursday, August 31st, 2017

Really enjoyed listening to @fox talk about web performance.

https://speakerdeck.com/fox/the-state-of-the-web

Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

Going to Zürich. brb

Tim Harford — Article — What We Get Wrong About Technology

Toilet paper, barbed wire, shipping containers, and replicants.

Tuesday, August 29th, 2017

Brendan Dawes - Things I’ve learnt so far from speaking at conferences

Brendan’s list of dos and don’ts (mostly don’ts) from his years of conference speaking.

Problem space

Adam Wathan wrote an article recently called CSS Utility Classes and “Separation of Concerns”. In it, he documents his journey through different ways of thinking about CSS. A lot of it is really familiar.

Phase 1: “Semantic” CSS

Ah, yes! If you’ve been in the game for a while then this will be familiar to you. The days when we used to strive to keep our class names to a minimum and use names that described the content. But, as Adam points out:

My markup wasn’t concerned with styling decisions, but my CSS was very concerned with my markup structure.

Phase 2: Decoupling styles from structure

This is the work pioneered by Nicole with OOCSS, and followed later by methodologies like BEM and SMACSS.

This felt like a huge improvement to me. My markup was still “semantic” and didn’t contain any styling decisions, and now my CSS felt decoupled from my markup structure, with the added bonus of avoiding unnecessary selector specificity.

Amen!

But then Adam talks about the issues when you have two visually similar components that are semantically very different. He shows a few possible solutions and asks this excellent question:

For the project you’re working on, what would be more valuable: restyleable HTML, or reusable CSS?

For many projects reusable CSS is the goal. But not all projects. On the Code For America project, the HTML needed to be as clean as possible, even if that meant more brittle CSS.

Phase 3: Content-agnostic CSS components

Naming things is hard:

The more a component does, or the more specific a component is, the harder it is to reuse.

Adam offers some good advice on naming things for maximum reusability. It’s all good stuff, and this would be the point at which I would stop. At this point there’s a nice balance between reusability, readability, and semantic meaning.

But Adam goes further…

Phase 4: Content-agnostic components + utility classes

Okay. The occasional utility class (for alignment and clearing) can be very handy. This is definitely the point to stop though, right?

Phase 5: Utility-first CSS

Oh God, no!

Once this clicked for me, it wasn’t long before I had built out a whole suite of utility classes for common visual tweaks I needed, things like:

  • Text sizes, colors, and weights
  • Border colors, widths, and positions
  • Background colors
  • Flexbox utilities
  • Padding and margin helpers

If one drink feels good, then ten drinks must be better, right?

At this point there is no benefit to even having an external stylesheet. You may as well use inline styles. Ah, but Adam has anticipated this and counters with this difference between inline styles and having utility classes for everything:

You can’t just pick any value want; you have to choose from a curated list.

Right. But that isn’t a technical solution, it’s a cultural one. You could just as easily have a curated list of allowed inline style properties and values. If you are in an environment where people won’t simply create a new utility class every time they want to style something, then you are also in an environment where people won’t create new inline style combinations every time they want to style something.

I think Adam has hit on something important here, but it’s not about utility classes. His suggestion of “utility-first CSS” will only work if the vocabulary is strictly adhered to. For that to work, everyone touching the code needs to understand the system and respect the boundaries of it. That understanding and respect is far, far more important than any particular way of structuring HTML and CSS. No technical solution can replace that sort of agreement …not even slapping !important on every declaration to make them immutable.

I very much appreciate the efforts that people have put into coming up with great naming systems and methodologies, even the ones I don’t necessarily agree with. They’re all aiming to make that overlap of HTML and CSS less painful. But the really hard problem is where people overlap.

User Interfaces for Variable Fonts · An A List Apart Article

A good introduction to variable fonts, and an exploration of the possible interface elements we might use to choose our settings: toggles? knobs? sliders? control pads?

Software development 450 words per minute - Vincit

Tuukka Ojala is a programmer working on the web. He’s also blind. Here are the tools of his trade.

The Fretful Federation

It turns out that Brighton has a mandolin orchestra. This aligns with my interests.

Three Readings and a Festival | Unbound

More on that event with Brian Aldiss I was reminiscing about: that was the first time that Kate unveiled part of her Purple People book:

Jeremy insisted this would be an excellent opportunity for me to read an excerpt from Purple People, and so invited me onto the stage with those illustrious, wordy wizards to share an early indigo excerpt. I was quite literally shaking that night (even more than a talking tree, ho ho), but all was jolly. I read my piece without falling off the stage, and afterwards, folk made some ace and encouraging comments.

Now the book is being crowdfunded for publication and you can take part. It’s currently 59% funded …come on, people, let’s make this happen!

The Philip K Dick book I love most… | Books | The Guardian

Three authors pick their favourite book by Philip K Dick:

  • Nicola Barker: Puttering About in a Small Land
  • Michael Moorcock: Time Out of Joint
  • Adam Roberts: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Sunday, August 27th, 2017

Lola and Jessica.

Lola and Jessica.

Heading home with a new companion in tow. cc. @brownorama

Heading home with a new companion in tow.

cc. @brownorama

Saturday, August 26th, 2017

Checked in at Marymoor Amphitheatre. Beck — with Jessica, Jeb

Thursday, August 24th, 2017

Mercer Street Books haul. 📚

Mercer Street Books haul. 📚

Malte Ubl on Twitter: “🙏🏿 to @sebabenz for testing that this isn’t an AMP special case. Safari now defaults to sharing the canonical URL 👏🏾

If Safari is updating its “share” functionality to look for canonical URLs, then that should work not just for AMP pages, but also Medium posts that include a canonical URL (like the ones created by posting to the Medium API, which is what I’m doing).

A Progressive Roadmap for your Progressive Web App - Cloud Four

Jason lists the stages of gradually turning the Cloud Four site into a progressive web app:

And you can just keep incrementally adding and tweaking:

You don’t have to wait to bundle up a binary, submit it to an app store, and wait for approval before your customers benefit.

Checked in at La Marzocco Cafe. with Jessica

Mapping in HTML – a proposal for a new element – Terence Eden’s Blog

I quite like this proposal for geo element in HTML, especially that it has a fallback built in (like video). I’m guessing the next step is to file an issue and create a web component to demonstrate how this could work.

That brings up another question: what do you name a custom element that you’d like to eventually become part of the spec? You can’t simply name it geo because you have to include a hyphen. geo-polyfill? geo-proposal? or polyfill-geo? proposal-geo?

Wednesday, August 23rd, 2017

When @wordridden met @IsabellaABT.

When @wordridden met @IsabellaABT.

Integrating Animation into a Design System · An A List Apart Article

Alla looks at ways of documenting animations into a pattern library. I tell ya, her book is going to be unmissable!

Decentralize It!

Paul Ford jots down his thoughts on that report on Ev’s blog:

The web is inherently decentralized, which has made it much easier for large companies to create large, centralized platforms. It’s a paradox and very thorny. I’m writing this on a centralized platform called Medium. Clap!

I like his geeky idea for mini self-contained social networks:

What I want is like, 5 of these little computers and whenever I see a truly trusted friend, I just give them one. And they take it home, and plug it in somewhere, and now we’re on the same, secure network together. Sharing files and with a little messageboard. Maybe after 5 computers the network can’t get any bigger. And if you unplug one your whole archive goes down. I don’t know. I’m riffing here.

The Decentralized Web

A report by the Digital Currency Initiative and the Center for Civic Media. Download the PDF or read the executive summary.

In this report, we explore two important ways structurally decentralized systems could help address the risks of mega-platform consolidation: First, these systems can help users directly publish and discover content directly, without intermediaries, and thus without censorship. All of the systems we evaluate advertise censorship-resistance as a major benefit. Second, these systems could indirectly enable greater competition and user choice, by lowering the barrier to entry for new platforms. As it stands, it is difficult for users to switch between platforms (they must recreate all their data when moving to a new service) and most mega-platforms do not interoperate, so switching means leaving behind your social network.

Brian Aldiss

After the eclipse I climbed down from the hilltop and reconnected with the world. That’s when I heard the news. Brian Aldiss had passed away.

He had a good innings. A very good innings. He lived to 92 and was writing right up to the end.

I’m trying to remember the first thing I read by Brian Aldiss. I think it might have been The Billion Year Spree, his encyclopaedia of science fiction. The library in my hometown had a copy when I was growing up, and I was devouring everything SF-related.

Decades later I had the great pleasure of meeting the man. It was 2012 and I was in charge of putting together the line-up for that year’s dConstruct. I had the brilliant Lauren Beukes on the line-up all the way from South Africa and I thought it would be fun to organise some kind of sci-fi author event the evening before. Well, one thing led to another: Rifa introduced me to Tim Aldiss, who passed along a request to his father, who kindly agreed to come to Brighton for the event. Then Brighton-based Jeff Noon came on board. The end result was an hour and a half in the company of three fantastic—and fantastically different—authors.

I had the huge honour of moderating the event. Here’s the transcript of that evening and here’s the audio.

That evening and the subsequent dConstruct talks—including the mighty James Burke—combined to create one of the greatest weekends of my life. Seriously. I thought it was just me, but Chris has also written about how special that author event was.

Brian Aldiss, Jeff Noon, and Lauren Beukes on the Brighton SF panel, chaired by Jeremy Keith

Brian Aldiss was simply wonderful that evening. He regaled us with the most marvellous stories, at times hilarious, at other times incredibly touching. He was a true gentleman.

I’m so grateful that I’ll always have the memory of that evening. I’m also very grateful that I have so many Brian Aldiss books still to read.

I’ve barely made a dent into the ludicrously prolific output of the man. I’ve read just some of his books:

  • Non-stop—I’m a sucker for generation starship stories,
  • Hothouse—ludicrously lush and trippy,
  • Greybeard—a grim vision of a childless world before Children Of Men,
  • The Hand-reared Boy—filthy, honest and beautifully written,
  • Heliconia Spring—a deep-time epic …and I haven’t even read the next two books in the series!

Then there are the short stories. Hundreds of ‘em! Most famously Super-Toys Last All Summer Long—inspiration for the Kubrick/Spielberg A.I. film. It’s one of the most incredibly sad stories I’ve ever read. I find it hard to read it without weeping.

Passed by a second-hand book stall on the way into work. My defences were down. Not a bad haul for a fiver.

Whenever a great artist dies, it has become a cliché to say that they will live on through their work. In the case of Brian Aldiss and his astounding output, it’s quite literally true. I’m looking forward to many, many years of reading his words.

My sincerest condolences to his son Tim, his partner Alison, and everyone who knew and loved Brian Aldiss.

Interface font family

Interface is a font for highly legible text on computer screens.

And it’s free!

Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017

Refraction Networking

This looks like an interesting network-level approach to routing around the censorship of internet-hostile governments like China, Turkey, Australia, and the UK.

Rather than trying to hide individual proxies from censors, refraction brings proxy functionality to the core of the network, through partnership with ISPs and other network operators. This makes censorship much more costly, because it prevents censors from selectively blocking only those servers used to provide Internet freedom. Instead, whole networks outside the censored country provide Internet freedom to users—and any encrypted data exchange between a censored nation’s Internet and a participating friendly network can become a conduit for the free flow of information.

Inside a super fast CSS engine: Quantum CSS (aka Stylo) ★ Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog

Lin gives a deep dive into Firefox’s new CSS engine specifically, but this is also an excellent primer on how browsers handle CSS in general: parsing, styling, layout, painting, compositing, and rendering.

60 seconds over Idaho

I lived in Germany for the latter half of the nineties. On August 11th, 1999, parts of Germany were in the path of a total eclipse of the sun. Freiburg—the town where I was living—wasn’t in the path, so Jessica and I travelled north with some friends to Karlsruhe.

The weather wasn’t great. There was quite a bit of cloud coverage, but at the moment of totality, the clouds had thinned out enough for us to experience the incredible sight of a black sun.

(The experience was only slightly marred by the nearby idiot who took a picture with the flash on right before totality. Had my eyesight not adjusted in time, he would still be carrying that camera around with him in an anatomically uncomfortable place.)

Eighteen years and eleven days later, Jessica and I climbed up a hill to see our second total eclipse of the sun. The hill is in Sun Valley, Idaho.

Here comes the sun.

Travelling thousands of miles just to witness something that lasts for a minute might seem disproportionate, but if you’ve ever been in the path of totality, you’ll know what an awe-inspiring sight it is (if you’ve only seen a partial eclipse, trust me—there’s no comparison). There’s a primitive part of your brain screaming at you that something is horribly, horribly wrong with the world, while another part of your brain is simply stunned and amazed. Then there’s the logical part of your brain which is trying to grasp the incredible good fortune of this cosmic coincidence—that the sun is 400 times bigger than the moon and also happens to be 400 times the distance away.

This time viewing conditions were ideal. Not a cloud in the sky. It was beautiful. We even got a diamond ring.

I like to think I can be fairly articulate, but at the moment of totality all I could say was “Oh! Wow! Oh! Holy shit! Woah!”

Totality

Our two eclipses were separated by eighteen years, but they’re connected. The Saros 145 cycle has been repeating since 1639 and will continue until 3009, although the number of total eclipses only runs from 1927 to 2648.

Eighteen years and twelve days ago, we saw the eclipse in Germany. Yesterday we saw the eclipse in Idaho. In eighteen years and ten days time, we plan to be in Japan or China.

What Would Augment Reality? (with images, tweets) · lukew · Storify

Luke has been asking people to imagine ways of augmenting the world. Spimes are back, baby!

To reduce gender biases, acknowledge them : Nature News & Comment

Deb Chachra:

If research on biases has told us anything, it is that humans make better decisions when we learn to recognize and correct for bias.

A few technical words about Upsideclown, and some thoughts about audiences and the web (17 Aug., 2017, at Interconnected)

Matt writes about the pleasure of independent publishing on the web today:

It feels transgressive to have a website in 2017. Something about having a domain name and about coding HTML which is against the grain now. It’s something big companies do, not small groups. We’re supposed to put our content on Facebook or Medium, or keep our publishing to an email newsletter. But a website?

But he points out a tension between the longevity that you get from hosting the canonical content yourself, and the lack of unified analytics when you syndicate that content elsewhere.

There’s no simple online tool that lets me add up how many people have read a particular story on Upsideclown via the website, the RSS feed, and the email newsletter. Why not? If I add syndication to Facebook, Google, and Apple, I’m even more at sea.

Checked in at Hot Water Inn. with Jessica

The Web as a Material — Joschi Kuphal · Web architect · Nuremberg / Germany

Joschi gives the backstory to last week’s excellent Material conference in Iceland that he and Brian organised. I love that this all started with a conversation at Indie Web Camp Brighton back in 2014.

Monday, August 21st, 2017

I was an old-school hard sci-fi nut… - CJ Thorpe-Tracey | Facebook

Every newspaper has an obituary of Brian Aldiss today, but this heartfelt reminiscence by Chris feels very special to me:

Jeremy got Brian for the panel alongside Lauren Beukes and Jeff Noon - the result is still probably the single best author event I’ve ever attended.

Just heard the sad news that @BrianAldiss has passed away.

My sincerest condolences to @TimAldiss and all who knew and loved him.

Checked in at Valley View Trail. Hiked up a hill for the eclipse — with Jessica

Checked in at Valley View Trail. Hiked up a hill for the eclipse — with Jessica

Waiting for totality.

Waiting for totality.

Staring at the sun.

Staring at the sun.

Halfway up the hillside.

Halfway up the hillside.

Sitting on a hilltop, staring at the sun and the moon.

Checked in at Konditorei. with Jessica

Checked in at Warfield Distillery

Reading A Closed And Common Orbit by Becky Chambers.

Going to Sun Valley, Idaho. brb …AFTER THE MOON COVERS THE FACE OF THE FREAKIN’ SUN!!!

Sunday, August 20th, 2017

If you really dislike FOUT, `font-display: optional` might be your jam | CSS-Tricks

Everyone’s been talking about font-display: swap as a way of taking the pain out of loading web fonts, but here Chris looks at font-display: optional and font-display: fallback as well.

Patterns Day 2017 | Flickr

Marc took some great pictures at Patterns Day.

In the break

Unacceptable usage

Fortune magazine published a list of all the companies who say hate groups can’t use their services anymore:

  • GoDaddy,
  • Google,
  • Apple,
  • Cloudflare,
  • Airbnb,
  • PayPal,
  • Discover Financial Services,
  • Visa,
  • Spotify,
  • Discord, and
  • GoFundMe.

Digital Ocean aren’t listed in the article but they’ve also cut off the oxygen to hate groups that were using their platform.

There’s another company that I wish were on that list: Shopify. They provide Breitbart with its online store. That’s despite clause three of their Acceptable Usage Policy:

Hateful Content: You may not offer goods or services, or post or upload Materials, that condone or promote violence against people based on race, ethnicity, color, national origin, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability, medical condition or veteran status.

The flimsy free speech defence looks even more spineless in light of the actions of other companies.

I’m incredibly disappointed in Shopify. I’m starting to have misgivings about appearing at events or on podcasts sponsored by Shopify—being two degrees of separation away from the hatefulness of Breitfart doesn’t sit well with me.

I sincerely hope that Shopify will change their stance, enforce their own terms of service, and dropify hate speech.

The Nine Principles Of Design Implementation – Smashing Magazine

I like this list:

This is not a checklist. Instead, it is a set of broad guidelines meant to preserve an underlying value. It can be used as a guide for someone working on implementation or as a tool to evaluate an existing project.

I’ve added them to my collection of design principles.

J.K. Rowling Defends Author After a Guy Mansplains Her Book to Her | Teen Vogue

Author = Laura

Guy = Erik Spiekermann

All’s well that ends well in this tale, and it prompted my entry for the subtweeting Olympics.

Offline POSTs with Progressive Web Apps – Web Dev @ Microsoft – Medium

This is a smart way to queue up POST submissions for later if the user is offline. It’s not as powerful as background sync (because it requires the user to revisit your site) but it’s a good fallback for browsers that support service workers but don’t yet support background sync

10 guidelines to improve your web accessibility | Aerolab

  1. Do not depend on color
  2. Do not block zoom
  3. Rediscover the alt attribute
  4. Add subtitles and captions to your videos
  5. Semantics = accessibility
  6. Use the right mark-up
  7. Use roles when necessary
  8. On hiding elements
  9. Follow web accessibility standards
  10. Audit and review

Twitter and Tear Gas by Zeynep Tufekci

There’s a free Creative Commons licensed PDF of this vital book available online.

A riveting firsthand account and incisive analysis of modern protest, revealing internet-fueled social movements’ greatest strengths and frequent challenges.

A Book Apart, Accessibility for Everyone

I can’t wait to get my hands on Laura’s book. It will be released on September 26th, but you can preorder it now.

Lola.

Lola.

Mesa.

Mesa.

Saturday, August 19th, 2017

Material Conference by Amber Wilson

Amber describes Material much better than I could:

There’s an element of magic in the air that you get to grasp and breathe in when you gather in the same place with so many different people – people with stories and paths they could write books about. The passion, the ideas, the stories of difficult journeys (the behind-the-scenes that you never see on social media). All of this makes not a basic recipe for a good time, but one for a delicious, enlightening experience that I’ve not seen replicated in any other environment.

The only thing she neglects to mention is that her talk was very much part of what made the event so special.

Going to Seattle. brb

Packing a bag and running through my checklist:

✅ passport ✅ ticket ✅ money ✅ eclipse glasses

Not for the first time, I find myself wishing that English (or German) had a word as expressive as the Dutch “mierenneuker”.

Friday, August 18th, 2017

Poco Apollo

Here’s a beautiful use of the web audio API: Enoesque generative music composed right in your browser. Each piece is generated from one of the 14,226 photos in NASA’s Apollo archive. The darker and murkier the picture, the moodier the music.

Thursday, August 17th, 2017

Checked in at Micro Bar. with Jessica, Joschi, Dan, brian, Amber

Material 2017

I’m in Iceland. Everything you’ve heard is true. It’s a beautiful fascinating place, and I had a wonderful day of exploration yesterday.

But I didn’t just come to the land of ice and snow—of the midnight sun where the hot springs blow—just to take in the scenery. I’m also here for the Material conference, which just wrapped up. It was very small, and very, very good.

Reading the description of the event, it would definitely be a tough sell trying to get your boss to send you to this. And yet I found it to be one of the most stimulating conferences I’ve attended in a while. It featured talks about wool, about art, about psychology, about sound, about meditation, about photography, about storytelling, and yes, about the web.

That sounds like a crazy mix of topics, but what was really crazy was the way it all slotted together. Brian weaved together a narrative throughout the day, drawing together strands from all of the talks and injecting his own little provocations into the mix too. Is the web like sound? Is the web like litmus paper? Is the web like the nervous system of a blue whale? (you kinda had to be there)

I know it’s a cliché to talk about a conference as being inspirational, but I found myself genuinely inspired by what I heard today. I don’t mean inspired in the self-help feel-good kind of way; I mean the talks inspired thoughts, ideas, and questions.

I think the small-scale intimacy of the event really added something. There were about fifty of us in attendance, and we all ate lunch together, which added to the coziness. I felt some of the same vibe that Brooklyn Beta and Reboot used to generate—a place for people to come together that isn’t directly connected to day-to-day work, but not entirely disconnected either; an adjacent space where seemingly unconnected disciplines get threaded together.

If this event happens again next year, I’ll be back.

Salmon.

Salmon.

The view from the venue.

The view from the venue.

Having an excellent and inspiring time at the Material conference in Reykjavik.

Having an excellent and inspiring time at the Material conference in Reykjavik.

Fish Market.

Fish Market.

Wednesday, August 16th, 2017

Exploring Iceland’s Golden Circle with @wordridden. ✅ Waterfalls ✅ Hot springs ✅ Arctic fox https://adactio.com/notes/archive/2017/08/16

Exploring Iceland’s Golden Circle with @wordridden.

✅ Waterfalls ✅ Hot springs ✅ Arctic fox

https://adactio.com/notes/archive/2017/08/16

Arctic fox!

Arctic fox!

Icelandic water. 🇮🇸 💦

Icelandic water. 🇮🇸 💦

Flowers of the volcano. 🌺 🌋

Flowers of the volcano. 🌺 🌋

Checked in at Kerið. with Jessica

Checked in at Kerið. with Jessica

Checked in at Secret Lagoon (Gamla Laugin). Hot springs — with Jessica

Checked in at Secret Lagoon (Gamla Laugin). Hot springs — with Jessica

Big waterfall.

Big waterfall.

Little waterfall.

Little waterfall.

Gullfoss.

Gullfoss.

Checked in at Gullfoss

Checked in at Great Geysir (Stóri Geysir)

Checked in at Great Geysir (Stóri Geysir)

Checked in at Laugarvatn. Hot pebbles. — with Jessica

Checked in at Laugarvatn. Hot pebbles. — with Jessica

Waterfall.

Waterfall.

Þingvellir

Þingvellir

Checked in at Thingvellir National Park (Þingvellir þjóðgarður). with Jessica

Checked in at Reykjavík Roasters. with Jessica

Checked in at Reykjavík Roasters. with Jessica

I am a Leif on the wind.

I am a Leif on the wind.

Brian and Jessica.

Brian and Jessica.

Pastries.

Pastries.

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017

Checked in at Reykjavík Roasters. with Jessica

Checked in at Reykjavík Roasters. with Jessica

Going to Iceland. brb

Reading A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived by Adam Rutherford.

Sunday, August 13th, 2017

SVG can do THAT?! by sdrasner

119 slides from Sarah on a wide range of SVG magic (with code).

Ballet on the croquet lawn.

Ballet on the croquet lawn.

Charlie’s angels.

Charlie’s angels.

Hanging out with the cool kids.

Hanging out with the cool kids.

Sunshine and gin punch.

Sunshine and gin punch.

Checked in at Firle Place. Soaking up the sunshine — with Jessica

Saturday, August 12th, 2017

A beer, a book, and a bouzouki.

A beer, a book, and a bouzouki.

Koya Bound — Eight Days on Japan’s Kumano Kodo

Speaking of Koya Bound, here’s the web-based counterpart to the physical book.

To Make a Book, Walk on a Book — Craig Mod

The ability of the physical world — a floor, a wall — to act as a screen of near infinite resolution becomes more powerful the more time we spend heads-down in our handheld computers, screens the size of palms. In fact, it’s almost impossible to see the visual patterns — the inherent adjacencies — of a physical book unless you deconstruct it and splay it out on the floor.

Craig gives us a walkthrough—literally—of the process behind the beautiful Koya Bound book.

Deciding to make any book is an act of creative faith (and ego and hubris, but these aren’t all exclusionary). But before Dan and I sold any copies of Koya Bound, we walked atop the pages that would become the book, not really knowing if there existed an audience for the book.

Shadow DOM: fast and encapsulated styles – Monica Dinculescu

Monica explains how Shadow DOM could be the perfect answer for scoping CSS:

We didn’t have style encapsulation, so we started naming things “the right way” with BEM, so that we didn’t accidentally stomp over each other’s styles. We wanted to be able to author CSS from inside a JavaScript component, so we started using CSS-in-JS. We needed all these tools, because “the platform” (read: the browsers that be) wasn’t there, and building these tools showed that there was a need to move forward. For style encapsulation, Shadow DOM is the platform moving forward.

Although, in a way, Shadow DOM is also another flavour of CSS-in-JS:

Before you complain that using a Shadow DOM and Web Components means that it absolutely requires JavaScript: this is true.

I made a style guide for my personal web site and you should too.—zachleat.com

Here’s Zach’s style guide. But the real reason I’m linking to this is his lovely description of having a personal website that grows over time:

As my own little corner of the web unceremoniously turned ten years old this year, it’s really starting to feel more like a garden than a piece of software. I certainly enjoy tending to it. I can plant what I like and with proper care it can grow into something useful.

I’m a woman in computer science. Let me ladysplain the Google memo to you. - Vox

Cynthia Lee didn’t write the clickbaity headline, but she did write the superb article that follows it, methodically taking the manifestbro apart:

Its quasi-professional tone is a big part of what makes it so beguiling (to some) and also so dangerous. Many defenders seem genuinely baffled that a document that works so hard to appear dispassionate and reasonable could provoke such an emotional response.

This is what I was trying to get at with my post, but here it is explained far more clearly, calmly, and rationally.

In the end, focusing the conversation on the minutiae of the scientific claims in the manifesto is a red herring. Regardless of whether biological differences exist, there is no shortage of glaring evidence, in individual stories and in scientific studies, that women in tech experience bias and a general lack of a welcoming environment, as do underrepresented minorities. Until these problems are resolved, our focus should be on remedying that injustice.

If you want to debate the Googler’s Manifesto and you’re also a good person

We men face shame and firing if we say the wrong thing. Women face the same plus rape threats, death threats, and all kinds of sustained harassment. So women can’t speak up safely and therefore they would have to watch their male colleagues discuss how a woman’s brain determines her interests. How impossibly maddening that would be.

Checked in at Carlito Burrito. Pork pibil tacos.

Checked in at Carlito Burrito. Pork pibil tacos.

Friday, August 11th, 2017

Having a train beer with @gablaxian on the way to Cambridge. 🚂 🍻

Having a train beer with @gablaxian on the way to Cambridge. 🚂 🍻

Thursday, August 10th, 2017

Sass variables = const

CSS custom properties = let

Wednesday, August 9th, 2017

Intolerable

I really should know better than to 386 myself, but this manifesto from a (former) Googler has me furious.

Oh, first of all, let me just get past any inevitable whinging that I’m not bothering to refute the bullshit contained therein. In the spirit of Brandolini’s law, here are some thorough debunkings:

Okay, with that out of the way, let me get to what really grinds my gears about this.

First off, there’s the contents of the document itself. It is reprehensible. It sets out to prove a biological link between a person’s gender and their ability to work at Google. It fails miserably, as shown in the links above, but it is cleverly presented as though it were an impartial scientific evaluation (I’m sure it’s complete coincidence that the author just happens to be a man). It begins by categorically stating that the author is all for diversity. This turns out to be as accurate as when someone starts a sentence with “I’m not a racist, but…”

The whole thing is couched in scientism that gives it a veneer of respectability. That leads me to the second thing I’m upset about, and that’s the reaction to the document.

Y’know, it’s one thing when someone’s clearly a troll. It’s easy—and sensible—to dismiss their utterances and move on. But when you see seemingly-smart people linking to the manifestbro and saying “he kind of has a point”, it’s way more infuriating. If you are one of those people (and when I say people, I mean men), you should know that you have been played.

The memo is clearly not a screed. It is calm, clear, polite, and appears perfectly reasonable. “Look,” it says, “I’m just interested in the objective facts here. I’m being reasonable, and if you’re a reasonable person, then you will give this a fair hearing.”

That’s a very appealing position. What reasonable person would reject it? And so, plenty of men who consider themselves to be reasonable and objective are linking to the document and saying it deserves consideration. Strangely, those same men aren’t considering the equally reasonable rebuttals (linked to above). That’s confirmation bias.

See? I can use terms like that to try to make myself sound smart too. Mind you, confirmation bias is not the worst logical fallacy in the memo. That would the Texas sharpshooter fallacy (which, admittedly, is somewhat related to confirmation bias). And, yes, I know that by even pointing out the logical fallacies, I run the risk of committing the fallacy fallacy. The memo is reprehensible not for the fallacies it contains, but for the viewpoint it sets out to legitimise.

The author cleverly wraps a disgusting viewpoint in layers of reasonable-sounding arguments. “Can’t we have a reasonable discussion about this? Like reasonable people? Shouldn’t we tolerate other points of view?” Those are perfectly sensible questions to ask if the discussion is about tabs vs. spaces or Star Wars vs. Star Trek. But those questions cease to be neutral if the topic under discussion is whether some human beings are genetically unsuited to coding.

This is how we get to a situation where men who don’t consider themselves to be sexist in any way—who consider themselves to be good people—end up posting about the Google memo in their workplace Slack channels as though it were a topic worthy of debate. It. Is. Not.

“A-ha!” cry the oh-so-logical and thoroughly impartial men, “If a topic cannot even be debated, you must be threatened by the truth!”

That is one possible conclusion, yes. Or—and this is what Occam’s razor would suggest—it might just be that I’m fucking sick of this. Sick to my stomach. I am done. I am done with even trying to reason with people who think that they’re the victimised guardians of truth and reason when they’re actually just threatened by the thought of a world that doesn’t give them special treatment.

I refuse to debate this. Does that make me inflexible? Yep, sure does. But, y’know, not everything is worthy of debate. When the very premise of the discussion is harmful, all appeals to impartiality ring hollow.

If you read the ex-Googler’s memo and thought “seems reasonable to me”, I hope you can see how you have been played like a violin. Your most virtuous traits—being even-handed and open-minded—have been used against you. I hope that you will try to use those same traits to readdress what has been done. If you read through the rebuttals linked to above and still think that the original memo was reasonable, I fear the damage is quite deep.

It may seem odd that a document that appears to be so reasonable is proving to be so very divisive. But it’s that very appearance of impartiality that gives it its power. It is like an optical illusion for the mind. Some people—like me—read it and think, “this is clearly wrong and harmful.” Other people—who would never self-identify as sexist in any way—read it and think, “seems legit.”

I’m almost—almost—glad that it was written. It’s bringing a lot of buried biases into the light.

By the way, if you are one of those people who still thinks that the memo was “perfectly reasonable” or “made some good points”, and we know each other, please get in touch so that I can re-evaluate our relationship.

The saddest part about all of this is that there are men being incredibly hurtful and cruel to the women they work with, without even realising what they’re doing. They may even think think they are actively doing good.

Take this tweet to Jen which was no doubt intended as a confidence boost:

See how it is glibly passed off as though it were some slight disagreement, like which flavour of ice cream is best? “Well, we’ll agree to disagree about half the population being biologically unsuitable for this kind of work.” And then that’s followed by what is genuinely—in good faith—intended as a compliment. But the juxtaposition of the two results in the message “Hey, you’re really good …for a woman.”

That’s what I find so teeth-grindingly frustrating about all this. I don’t think that guy is a troll. If he were, I could just block and move on. He genuinely thinks he’s a good person who cares about objective truth. He has been played.

A nasty comment from a troll is bad. It’s hurtful in a blunt, shocking way. But there’s a different kind of hurt that comes from a casual, offhand, even well-meaning comment that’s cruel in a more deep-rooted way.

This casual cruelty. This insidious, creeping, never-ending miasma of sexism. It is well and truly intolerable.

This is not up for debate.

I’m a Google Manufacturing Robot and I Believe Humans Are Biologically Unfit to Have Jobs in Tech - McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

Normally a McSweeney’s piece elicits a wry chuckle, but this one had me in stitches.

Humans are also far more likely to “literally cannot right now.” I have never met an automaton that literally could not, though I have met some that theoretically would not and hypothetically might want to stop.

Patterns Day 2017: Paul Lloyd on Vimeo

Paul pulls no punches in this rousing talk from Patterns Day.

The transcript is on his site.

I’ll be working on my website this evening at the Brighton Homebrew Website Club in @68MiddleSt from 6pm to 7:30pm. Feel free to join me.

Silicon Valley’s weapon of choice against women: shoddy science | Angela Saini | Opinion | The Guardian

Those who want to use science to support their views – especially if they seek to undermine equality efforts in the workplace – must make an effort to fully inform themselves about the science of human nature. They may be disappointed to learn that it’s not as simple as they think.

For more, read Angela Saini’s book Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong and the New Research That’s Rewriting the Story.

A Brief History of Women in Computing – Faruk Ateş

An excellent rebuttal of that vile manifestbro, and an informative history lesson to boot.

You can’t cherry-pick a couple of scientific studies you like and use them to justify your arguments against diversity programs, while carefully ignoring the mountains of other scientific studies that show both how and why diversity programs are good, beneficial to all, and worth investing in.

I wish I could be this calm in refuting pseudoscientific bollocks, but I get so worked up by it that I’d probably undermine my own message. I’m glad that Faruk took the time to write this down.

Malaphors | Unintentional blended idioms and phrases – It’s the cream of the cake!

Some of these really tickle my fancy bone.

That’s the icing on the iceberg

You let the horse out of the cart

What planet are you living under?

That opens a whole other kettle of fish

The cat’s out of the barn

Patience comes to those who wait

That’s right up my cup of tea

Monday, August 7th, 2017

Barley risotto with marinated feta.

Barley risotto with marinated feta.

Progressive Progressive Web Apps - Tales of a Developer Advocate by Paul Kinlan

Paul goes into detail describing how he built a progressive web app that’s actually progressive (in the sense of “enhancement”). Most of the stuff about sharing code between server and client goes over my head, but I understood enough to get these points:

  • the “app shell” model is not the only—or even the best—way of building a progressive web app, and
  • always, always, always render from the server first.

For all the pseudoscience in that manifestbro, all it proved was Brandolini’s law.

https://twitter.com/ziobrando/status/289635060758507521

Sunday, August 6th, 2017

Another Lens - News Deeply x Airbnb.Design

A series of questions to ask on any design project:

  • What are my lenses?
  • Am I just confirming my assumptions, or am I challenging them?
  • What details here are unfair? Unverified? Unused?
  • Am I holding onto something that I need to let go of?
  • What’s here that I designed for me? What’s here that I designed for other people?
  • What would the world look like if my assumptions were wrong?
  • Who might disagree with what I’m designing?
  • Who might be impacted by what I’m designing?
  • What do I believe?
  • Who’s someone I’m nervous to talk to about this?
  • Is my audience open to change?
  • What am I challenging as I create this?
  • How can I reframe a mistake in a way that helps me learn?
  • How does my approach to this problem today compare to how I might have approached this one year ago?
  • If I could learn one thing to help me on this project, what would that one thing be?
  • Do I need to slow down?

Alpaca Lunch (@alpaca_lunchnote) • Instagram photos and videos

Jon’s been drawing a lunch note for his daughter every day since she was four years old. They are somewhat puntastic.

Saturday, August 5th, 2017

Checked in at Royal Festival Hall. Romeo and Juliet — with Jessica

Checked in at Royal Festival Hall. Romeo and Juliet — with Jessica

Checked in at Bala Baya

Checked in at Bala Baya

Checked in at The Gentlemen Baristas. with Jessica

Checked in at The Gentlemen Baristas. with Jessica

Friday, August 4th, 2017

CSS: Current, Soon, Someday (Web Directions Code 2017) // Speaker Deck

Oh, how I wish I could’ve been at Web Directions Code in Melbourne to see this amazing presentation by Charlotte. I can’t quite get over how many amazing knowledge bombs she managed to drop in just 20 minutes!

Jeremy Keith: Keynote - Evaluating technology - YouTube

Here’s the video of the closing keynote I gave at the Frontend United conference in Athens.

There’s fifteen minutes of Q&A at the end where I waffle on in response to some thought-provoking ideas from the audience.

Thursday, August 3rd, 2017

Packing copies of @clagnut’s book.

Packing copies of @clagnut’s book.

Attachment #317095 for bug #175115

I’ve never been so excited by a single diff in a JSON file.

Service workers are coming to Safari.

Presenting the new d3.loom chart form plugin - Visual Cinnamon

Nadieh has packaged up the code for her lovely loom diagrams as a plug-in for d3.

The Critical Request | CSS-Tricks

Ben takes us on a journey inside the mind of a browser (Chrome in this case). It’s all about priorities when it comes to the critical path.

Patterns Day 2017: Alice Bartlett on Vimeo

At Patterns Day, Alice shared what she has learned from shepherding the Origami project within the Financial Times.

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

InspiroBot

I am an artificial intelligence dedicated to generating unlimited amounts of unique inspirational quotes for endless enrichment of pointless human existence.

Tuesday, August 1st, 2017

An exciting moment for @clagnut.

An exciting moment for @clagnut.

Top. Men.

Top.

Men.

So close, @huffduffer. So close.

So close, @huffduffer. So close.

Eating toast.