Archive: August 24th, 2019

“Never-Slow Mode” (a.k.a. “Slightly-Fast Mode”) Explained

I would very much like this to become a reality.

Never-Slow Mode (“NSM”) is a mode that sites can opt-into via HTTP header. For these sites, the browser imposes per-interaction resource limits, giving users a better user experience, potentially at the cost of extra developer work. We believe users are happier and more engaged on fast sites, and NSM attempts to make it easier for sites to guarantee speed to users. In addition to user experience benefits, sites might want to opt in because browsers could providing UI to users to indicate they are in “fast mode” (a TLS lock icon but for speed).

I’m dubious of this proposal. I just don’t think a nice bag can offer the kind of companionship you get from an animal.

I’m dubious of this proposal. I just don’t think a nice bag can offer the kind of companionship you get from an animal.

[this is aaronland] #mw19 – the presentation

The web embodies principles of openness and portability and access that best align with the needs, and frankly the purpose, of the cultural heritage sector.

Aaron’s talk from the 2019 Museums and the Web conference.

In 2019 the web is not “sexy” anymore and compared to native platforms it can sometimes seems lacking, but I think that speaks as much to people’s desire for something “new” as it does to any apples to apples comparison. On measure – and that’s the important part: on measure – the web affords a better and more sustainable framework for the cultural heritage to work in than any of the shifting agendas of the various platform vendors.

Replying to a post on remysharp.com

❤️

Consume less, create more

Editing is hard because you realize how bad you are. But editing is easy because we’re all better at criticizing than we are at creating.

Relatable:

My essay was garbage. But it was my garbage.

This essay is most definitely not garbage. I like it very much.

Plaidophile: So about that AMP-script thing

Reinventing the web the long way around, in a way that gives Google even more control of it. No thanks.

Reading Skyfaring by Mark Vanhoenacker.

Buy this book

Replying to a tweet from @tobie

If only Google Search had a similar model.

As it stands, the AMP team gets to offload the unfairness of the format’s privileged position onto the search team, while maintaining the appearance of open source and good governance for AMP.

Replying to a tweet from @cramforce

Replying to a tweet from @cramforce

You won’t recommend me for a Product Manager job at Google?

My dreams lie in tatters before me.

How about a position on the AMP advisory committee? I’m hoping fascists like me aren’t barred.

Replying to a tweet from @cramforce

Never once did I claim that using AMP would result in fewer clicks for publishers.

It’s exactly because AMP is guaranteed to work this way—while nothing else will—that makes the situation unfair.

Publishers have no choice but to use AMP.

Replying to a tweet from @cramforce

But only for AMP pages.

No other framework gets this treatment.

No other web pages—no matter how fast—get this treatment.

Any wonder that developers are resentful of AMP?

Replying to a tweet from @kryshiggins

You are not alone:

https://baymard.com/blog/deemphasize-install-app-ads

During our testing “Install App” banners were the direct and sole cause of several abandonments of some of the world’s largest e-commerce websites.

Replying to a tweet from @cramforce

You’ll notice that I never once said that AMP is a ranking factor.

I said AMP is unfairly privileged in Google search results …because AMP is unfairly privileged in Google search results.

That’s a real shame for AMP-the-format.

Replying to a tweet from @adactio

Replying to a tweet from @cramforce

AMP as often cited is not a ranking factor

This is the kind of semantic chicanery I’m talking about.

AMP pages are pre-rendered by Google. Regular (fast) web pages are not.

The Top Stories carousel appears above other results.

Replying to a tweet from @cramforce

Publisher value enabled by AMP?

Publishers are using AMP because they have to, not because they want to.

If AMP weren’t treated differently to other frameworks, we could assess its true value.

Replying to a tweet from @adactio

Also: holding this position apparently makes me a fascist.

(still shaking my head over that one)

Replying to a tweet from @cramforce

To understand my position, start with the position “one framework shouldn’t be unfairly privileged in search results” and then extrapolate from there. That is the fundamental disagreement.

(I think I’ve made that pretty clear, right?)

Picture 1 Picture 2 Picture 3

Beach scenes.

Florid.

Florid.

Replying to a tweet from @davegehring

According to Godwin’s Law, the discussion stopped here:

https://twitter.com/cramforce/status/1164693853032439810

Replying to a tweet from @jensimmons

Hint away! …But also, please charge your phone’s battery.