Archive: On this day

September 30th, 2022

Supporting logical properties

I wrote recently about making the switch to logical properties over on The Session.

Initially I tried ripping the band-aid off and swapping out all the directional properties for logical properties. After all, support for logical properties is green across the board.

But then I got some reports of people seeing formating issues. These people were using Safari on devices that could no longer update their operating system. Because versions of Safari are tied to versions of the operating system, there was nothing they could do other than switch to using a different browser.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, but as long as this situation continues, Safari is not an evergreen browser. (I also understand that problem lies with the OS architecture—it must be incredibly frustrating for the folks working on WebKit and/or Safari.)

So I needed to add fallbacks for older browsers that don’t support logical properties. Or, to put it another way, I needed to add logical properties as a progressive enhancement.

“No problem!” I thought. “The way that CSS works, I can just put the logical version right after the directional version.”

element { margin-left: 1em; margin-inline-start: 1em; }

But that’s not true in this case. I’m not over-riding a value, I’m setting two different properties.

In a left-to-right language like English it’s true that margin-inline-start will over-ride margin-left. But in a right-to-left language, I’ve just set margin-left and margin-inline-start (which happens to be on the right).

This is a job for @supports!

element { margin-left: 1em; } @supports (margin-inline-start: 1em) { element { margin-left: unset; margin-inline-start: 1em; } }

I’m doing two things inside the @supports block. I’m applying the logical property I’ve just tested for. I’m also undoing the previously declared directional property.

A value of unset is perfect for this:

The unset CSS keyword resets a property to its inherited value if the property naturally inherits from its parent, and to its initial value if not. In other words, it behaves like the inherit keyword in the first case, when the property is an inherited property, and like the initial keyword in the second case, when the property is a non-inherited property.

Now I’ve got three CSS features working very nicely together:

  1. @supports (also known as feature queries),
  2. logical properties, and
  3. the unset keyword.

For anyone using an up-to-date browser, none of this will make any difference. But for anyone who can’t update their Safari browser because they can’t update their operating system, because they don’t want to throw out their perfectly functional Apple device, they’ll continue to get the older directional properties:

I discovered that my Mom’s iPad was a 1st generation iPad Air. Apple stopped supporting that device in iOS 12, which means it was stuck with whatever version of Safari last shipped with iOS 12.

Indiepeople

I believe strongly in the indieweb principles of distributed ownership, control, and independence. For me, the important thing is that this is how we get to a diverse web. A web where everyone can define not just what they write but how they present is by definition far more expressive, diverse, and interesting than one where most online content and identities must be squished into templates created by a handful of companies based on their financial needs. In other words, the open web is far superior to a medium controlled by corporations in order to sell ads. The former encourages expression; the latter encourages consumerist conformity.

September 30th, 2021

Bruce Lawson’s personal site  : Set Safari free!

If Apple allowed Safari to actually compete, it would be better for web developers, businesses, consumers, and for the health of the web. Come on, Apple, set Safari free!

Twenty years ago I wrote the first entry in my online journal.

Today I wrote the two thousandth eight hundredth and eighteenth entry.

https://adactio.com/journal

Too late to stop now.

Twenty years of writing on my website

On this day twenty years ago I wrote the first entry in my online journal. In the intervening two decades I’ve written a further 2,817 entries.

I am now fifty years old, which means I’ve been blogging for two fifths of my lifetime.

My website has actually been around for longer than twenty years, but its early incarnations had no blog. That all changed when I relaunched the site on September 30th, 2001.

I wrote at the time:

I’m not quite sure what I will be saying here over the coming days, weeks, months and years.

Honestly I still feel like that.

I think it’s safe to assume an “anything goes” attitude for what I post here. Being a web developer, there’s bound to be lots of geeky, techy stuff but I also want a place where I can rant and rave about life in general.

That’s been pretty true, although I feel that maybe there’s been too much geeky stuff and not enough about everything else in my life.

I’ll try and post fairly regularly but I don’t want to make any promises I can’t keep. Hopefully, I’ll be updating the journal on a daily basis.

I made no promises but I think I’ve done a pretty good job. Many’s the blogger who has let the weeds grow over their websites as they were lured by the siren song of centralised social networks. I’m glad that I’ve managed to avoid that fate. It feels good to look back on twenty years of updates posted on my own domain.

Anyway, let’s see what happens. I hope you’ll like it.

I hope you still like it.

Here are some of my handpicked highlights from the past twenty years of blogging:

  • Hyperdrive, April 20th, 2007

    Last night in San Francisco.

  • Design doing, November 11, 2007

    The opposite of design thinking.

  • Iron Man and me, December 1st, 2008

    The story of how one of my Flickr pictures came to be used in a Hollywood movie.

  • Seams, May 12th, 2014

    There is a crack, a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in.

  • Web! What is it good for?, May 28th, 2015

    Not absolutely nothing, but not absolutely everything either.

  • Split, April 10th, 2019

    Materials and tools; client and server; declarative and imperative; inclusion and privilege.

Plus Equals #3, September 2021

Want to take a deep dive into tiling images? Like, a really deep dive. Rob has you covered.

Going to London. brb

September 30th, 2020

Aegir.org | Canvassing

Strong same:

I’m glad I have this site to play with things, almost all web development and ‘front-end’ stuff leaves me cold these days. It’s all so process driven, so full of unnecessary complexities and dependencies, it’s as if the entire industry wants you to forget you can write HTML by hand and upload it somewhere and it’s a working website. It’s complexity for complexity’s sake, like what accountancy software companies did to the tax code: “Oh this is too complex you need to pay us lots of money to sort it out.” Annoying. I can see some resistance to it and there are still people making blogs and playing around with stuff, so hopefully the professional professionals will calm the fuck down at some point.

Replying to a post on cdevroe.com

This is my micro.blog URL, by the way: https://micro.blog/adactio

September 30th, 2019

Replying to a tweet from @TejasKumar_

She’s smart and perceptive.

Replying to a tweet from @paul_irish

W00t!!!

Shout out to Requestmap from @Paul_Irish …something I’d love to see in dev tools: https://adactio.com/journal/15797

Shout out to Requestmap from @Paul_Irish …something I’d love to see in dev tools:

https://adactio.com/journal/15797

Replying to a tweet from @everdimension

You should demand your money back!

It was a real honour to be interviewed by @SaronYitbarek for the Command Line Heroes podcast live on stage at View Source—she’s so great!

Picture 1 Picture 2

Getting some great advice from @SoMelanieSaid at View Source for the dark mode styles I added to my site at Indie Web Camp Amsterdam yesterday.

September 30th, 2018

Checked in at The Bugle Inn. Session map

Checked in at The Bugle Inn. Session

CTS - conserve the sound

An online museum of sounds—the recordings of analogue machines.

Control Panel

Analogue switches, dials, and buttons, buttons, buttons (just like that Flickr group I linked to).

September 30th, 2017

September 30th, 2016

the new code – Even Stevens: Using Round and Space in Repeated Background Images

See, when I first heard about background-repeat: round; I thought it was something to do with making things circular. But no, it’s about tiling a background image so that nothing gets cut off. The amount of tiling required is rounded to the nearest whole number.

Now I get it.

GreenSock | “will-change” must change? Animators beware.

This will-change property that was intended to SOLVE problems for animators may end up doing the opposite.

It seems wise for the browsers to step back and let the spec authors fill in the implementation details and gain consensus before moving forward.

Sous vide lamb.

Sous vide lamb.

Someday

In the latest issue of Justin’s excellent Responsive Web Design weekly newsletter, he includes a segment called “The Snippet Show”:

This is what tells all our browsers on all our devices to set the viewport to be the same width of the current device, and to also set the initial scale to 1 (not scaled at all). This essentially allows us to have responsive design consistently.

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">

The viewport value for the meta element was invented by Apple when the iPhone was released. Back then, it was a safe bet that most websites were wider than the iPhone’s 320 pixel wide display—most of them were 960 pixels wide …because reasons. So mobile Safari would automatically shrink those sites down to fit within the display. If you wanted to over-ride that behaviour, you had to use the meta viewport gubbins that they made up.

That was nine years ago. These days, if you’re building a responsive website, you still need to include that meta element.

That seems like a shame to me. I’m not suggesting that the default behaviour should switch to assuming a fluid layout, but maybe the browser could just figure it out. After all, the CSS will already be parsed by the time the HTML is rendering. Perhaps a quick test for the presence of a crawlbar could be used to trigger the shrinking behaviour. No crawlbar, no shrinking.

Maybe someday the assumption behind the current behaviour could be flipped—assume a website is responsive unless the author explicitly requests the shrinking behaviour. I’d like to think that could happen soon, but I suspect that a depressingly large number of sites are still fixed-width (I don’t even want to know—don’t tell me).

There are other browser default behaviours that might someday change. Right now, if I type example.com into a browser, it will first attempt to contact http://example.com rather than https://example.com. That means the example.com server has to do a redirect, costing the user valuable time.

You can mitigate this by putting your site on the HSTS preload list but wouldn’t it be nice if browsers first checked for HTTPS instead of HTTP? I don’t think that will happen anytime soon, but someday …someday.

How can you contribute to Geek Mental Help Week? | Stuff & Nonsense

It’s Geek Mental Help Week from Monday. You can get involved.

I believe that talking about mental health issues and sharing our experiences—not just those of people who suffer, but also those who live with and support us—can help everyone. Whether you struggle with your own mental health or care for someone who does, you can help others to understand how you cope. Geek Mental Help Week is all about sharing those experiences.

A spot of six-up sketching at @Clearleft.

A spot of six-up sketching at @Clearleft.

Kebab.

Kebab.

Eagerly anticipating a kebab from @TheTrollsPantry.

Eagerly anticipating a kebab from @TheTrollsPantry.

70s Sci-Fi Art

Sci-fi book covers and posters from the 1970s.

September 30th, 2015

Bouillabaisse.

Bouillabaisse.

Salami and fennel.

Salami and fennel.

Hey @Mathowie, make sure you pick up plenty of Slack socks while you’re in San Francisco to bring with you to Austin, okay? #socksaddict

Welcome to Seattle, here’s your coffee.

Welcome to Seattle, here’s your coffee.

Riding the rails.

Riding the rails.

September 30th, 2014

Y Combinator and the negative externalities of Hacker News | Danilo Campos

When I wrote about Reddit and Hacker News, criticising their lack of moderation, civility, and basic decency, many people (invariably men) responded in defence of Reddit. Nobody defended Hacker News. Nobody.

Oh, and all of you people (men) defending Reddit? Here’s your party line …I find it abhorrent.

Laughing out loud throughout @Davatron5000’s @ArtifactConf talk. It is quite literally a LOLfest.

Ducking out of the conference to grab a coffee ’round the corner, remembering to remove my lanyard so I don’t look like a douchebadge.

Introducing Universal SSL

Great news from Cloudflare—https endpoints by default!

This means that if you’re planning on switching on TLS for your site, but you’re using Cloudflare as a CDN, you’ve got one less thing to change (and goodness knows you’re going to have enough to do already).

I really like their reasoning for doing this, despite the fact that it might mean that they take a financial hit:

Having cutting-edge encryption may not seem important to a small blog, but it is critical to advancing the encrypted-by-default future of the Internet. Every byte, however seemingly mundane, that flows encrypted across the Internet makes it more difficult for those who wish to intercept, throttle, or censor the web. In other words, ensuring your personal blog is available over HTTPS makes it more likely that a human rights organization or social media service or independent journalist will be accessible around the world. Together we can do great things.

Keep ’em Separated — ericportis.com

I share the concerns expressed here about the “sizes” attribute that’s part of the new turbo-powered img element (or “the picture element and its associates”, if you prefer). Putting style or layout information into HTML smells bad.

This is a concern that Matt Wilcox has raised:

Change the design and those breakpoints are likely to be wrong. So you’ll need to change all of the client-side mark-up that references images.

I can give you a current use-case: right here on adactio.com, you can change the stylesheet …so I can’t embed breakpoints or sizes into my img elements because—quite rightly—there’s a separation between the structural HTML layer and the presentational CSS layer.

Responsive Images: If you’re just changing resolutions, use srcset. | CSS-Tricks

Following on from that post of Jason’s I linked to, Chris also emphasises that, for most use cases, you probably only need to use srcset (and maybe sizes), but not the picture element with explicit sources.

It’s really, really great that people are writing about this, because it can be quite a confusing topic to wrap your head around at first.

Medicating with spicy kimchee chicken ramen.

Medicating with spicy kimchee chicken ramen.

Spent the afternoon holed up in my hotel room when I should have been listening to the excellent @ArtifactConf talks.

Airplanes; public transport; hotel room air-conditioning …all these factors seem to have conspired to give me a dose of the sniffles.

September 30th, 2011

Ten

On this day ten years ago I started this journal. There had been a site at adactio.com before that but it was a silly DHTML brochureware thing. That changed when I wrote my first blog post:

I’m not quite sure what I will be saying here over the coming days, weeks, months and years.

Ten years later this journal contains a decade’s worth of notes-to-self. When somebody else finds what I’ve written to be interesting, that’s a bonus …but I’m writing for myself (or, if I do ever imagine somebody else reading this, I imagine someone just like me—a frightening thought).

It has been a very rewarding, often cathartic experience so far. I know that blogging has become somewhat passé in this age of Twitter and Facebook but I plan to keep on keeping on right here in my own little corner of the web. I’ve been blogging now for 25% of my life.

This journal is one quarter as old as I am.

This journal is half as old the web itself.

Here’s to the next ten years.

September 30th, 2010

Evening edition - Bobulate

A lovely idea, nicely implemented: time-conditional CSS.

Hello, want to kill some time?

This might just be the best bookmarklet ever created. Use it to turn any page into an asteroid-like game of destruction.

Live style sheet editing!

Edit this page. Then view source.

September 30th, 2009

Culchavulching

Having a neighbourhood bookshop will always add a few points in the “feel-good” column in the balance sheet of life. City Books is located just a short stroll from my front door. As well as stocking a remarkable amount of signed books, they also put on regular events at The Old Market—also a short stroll from my front door.

A couple of weeks ago Jessica and I saw Rick Stein there, cooking some recipes from his latest book. Tonight we saw reading from The Death of Bunny Munro—his first novel since And the Ass Saw the Angel twenty years ago. It was a thoroughly enjoyable event, mostly thanks to the rapport between Cave and the host for the evening, Will Self.

It’s certainly nice having all this so close to home. Usually I’d have to travel up to the big smoke, as I did for Michael Moorcock and Alan Moore at the British Library—and as I’m sorely tempted to do again for Seamus Heaney on Beowulf.

The next Brighton-based chat I’m planning to attend will be more filmic than literary. The Duke of York’s cinema—yes, the same place that will be hosting Full Frontal—will be celebrating the 30th anniversary of Alien on October 25th with a screening of the film followed by an interview with (of Bladerunner fame) and (of designing-Darth-Vader’s-costume-yes-really fame).

If you are a fellow Brightonian geek, grab your ticket now. If you’re a non-Brightonian geek, you might want to consider a trip to Brighton for this.

HTML5 Elements and Attributes

A very handy interface for browsing the contents of the HTML5 spec.

Full Frontal

Usually when I write about an upcoming event, it’s because I’ll be speaking at it. But there’s an event coming up in eight weeks that I’m pretty excited about, where I’ll be an attendee rather than a speaker.

The cheekily-named Full Frontal will be taking place in the Duke of York’s cinema in Brighton on November 20th. It’s going to be all JavaScript, all the time. Christian Heilmann, Peter-Paul Koch, Stuart Langridge, Simon Willison, and others will be on hand to blow your mind with all things scripty.

I’ve mentioned this event already over on the DOM Scripting blog but the reason I’m mentioning it here now is that this is the last chance to grab early bird tickets; an absolute steal at just £100.

Great location. Great line-up. Great subject matter. Great organiser.

See you there.

September 30th, 2008

Reading immaterial

In an interview with Rolling Stone last year, William Gibson said:

One of the things our grandchildren will find quaintest about us is that we distinguish the digital from the real, the virtual from the real.

Bear that dying distinction in mind when I tell you that Joe’s new book is out. It’s called Organizing Our Marvellous Neighbours (geddit?). It’s all about spelling in Canadian English. If you buy it, you’ll get the book in HTML and PDF with very liberal licensing.

You can print it out if you want a physical artefact but it’s made to be read on-screen. If you fancy reading it on an iPhone or iPod Touch, I recommend getting the FileMagnet app which allows you to transfer files—including PDFs—from your computer to your i(Phone|Pod) over WiFi.

In the future, you’ll probably be able to just transfer the files directly to your brain.

Automata

The Flash on the Beach conference is currently underway here in Brighton. I spoke at the conference two years ago so thanks to organiser John Davey’s commitment to giving past speakers guest passes to future events, I’ve been popping in and out of the Dome over the past couple of days to sit in on some talks.

Yesterday I saw Branden Hall talk about Brilliant Ideas that I’ve Blatantly Stolen. Although his specific examples dealt with ActionScript, his overall message was applicable to any developer: look around at other languages and frameworks and scavenge anything you like the look of.

I wanted to make it to Aral’s talk this morning but as he was on first thing and I’m a lazy bugger, that didn’t really work out. I did, however, make it over in time to hear Carla Diana.

Carla made her name in the Flash world a few years ago with her wonderful site Repercussion where you can play around with sounds through a lovely isometric interface. Lately she’s been working with robots. Or rather, one robot in particular: Leo.

Here’s Leo attempting to become a that :

Leo

Carla’s job was to come up with a skin for Leo that didn’t send children running screaming. Yes, it’s the problem that plagues Japanese robots and Robert Zemeckis CGI movies in equal measure: .

Want to see something uncanny?

Boston Dynamics Big Dog

I was at Carla’s talk with Sophie and we were talking about robots afterwards (as you would). She said that watching robots in motion often makes her feel sad. Looking at that video, particularly the bit where the quadruped is kicked to demonstrate its balance, I understand what she means.

Funnily enough, my favourite robot is also a quadruped. All I want for Christmas is a .

Ghost in the Shell: S.A.C. 2nd GIG

Or I maybe I should just build my own. The latest project that Carla Diana is working on is something to make the arduino enthusiast drool. It’s called littleBits:

littleBits is an opensource library of discrete electronic components pre-assembled in tiny circuit boards. Just as Legos allow you to create complex structures with very little engineering knowledge, littleBits are simple, intuitive, space-sensitive blocks that make prototyping with sophisticated electronics a matter of snapping small magnets together.

littleBits intro

Nasty as they wanna be? Policing Flickr.com

A nice little report on community management at Flickr.

reboot10 - Jeremy Keith talks about the Transmission of Tradition

Here's the video of my talk from this year's Reboot conference in Copenhagen. I had a lot of fun talking about (and playing) Irish music here.

moomazon

Here's a nifty little mashup from Simon: create Moo cards with book details from Amazon.

September 30th, 2007

Kung Shui

Podcast coverage of South by Southwest Interactive 2007 continues to emerge, drop by drop. The audio recording of my joint presentation with Derek emerged last month. As usual, I’ve had the talk transcribed so you can read it, search it and link to it: Ajax Kung Fu Meets Accessibility Feng Shui.

Don’t forget: the RSS feed from the “articles” section of this site doubles up as a podcast.

There’s still no sign of the talk I did with Andy, How to Bluff Your Way in Web 2.0, but as soon as it’s available, I’ll get that transcribed too.

September 30th, 2006

Flickr Services: Flickr API: flickr.photos.comments.getList

Hallelujah! I've been waiting for Flickr to add this method. Now the API is truly complete.

Sydney to Melbourne

Jessica and I will be leaving the confines of Sydney to explore a little more of Australia. We’ll be coming to Melbourne next week.

We’re leaving Sydney on Wednesday at 11am, arriving in Melbourne at 12:30. We’ll stay until Saturday, when we’ll fly out of Melbourne at 11am to arrive back in Sydney at 12:20.

Melbournites, get in touch. I’ve met plenty of you over the last few days, and I figured a quick blog post would be easier than a mass mailout. Sitepoint people, WSG people, general geeks, leave a comment and let me know about places to stay, places to eat, and places to drink. See you all soon in what I’ve heard is the culinary capital of Australia.

Wrapping up Web Directions South

Web Directions South is over for this year. It was a top-notch conference.

The bar was set pretty high on day one, but day two turned out to be equally inspiring. That ol’ smoothie Malarkey got the crowd all fired up with his talk about design inspiration. His slick slides were matched by his equally slick outfit.

Kelly deserves a medal for her presentation. She had almost completely lost her voice, but she went ahead and spoke anyway, holding the lapel mike up close to her mouth so that her whispered words would be audible. What a trooper!

My second talk of the conference went better than I anticipated. I thought that the code-heavy, no-nonsense approach, so different from my first presentation, would put a lot of people off. Not so, apparently. I had a lot of people come to me at the party afterwards and tell me that they really enjoyed it. That surprised me. I thought it would be useful, but I didn’t think it would be very enjoyable.

In fact, I got the best piece of feedback that a presenter could ask for. A woman, whose name I have unfortunately forgotten (sorry!), told me that she was watching my presentation with her colleague as she frantically scribbled notes. At one point, she scribbled down a message and passed it to her colleague. It read, “this code is making me horny.”

Now, that’s my kind of audience.

As always with conferences like this, the presentations are only part of the experience. It’s the people that really make or break an event like this. I’m happy to report that the people at Web Directions were the salt of the earth. I’ve met so many nice, friendly, amusing, knowledgeable peers at this conference. It’s always great to finally meet people in the flesh after reading their blogs or looking at their Flickr pics for so long beforehand. And I was able to put faces to the names of some of my fellow microformateers, Dmitry Baranovskiy and Ben Buchanan.

Extra kudos must go to the Sitepoint gang who threw an excellent after-party, replete with free booze.

Keep an eye on the website for the forthcoming podcast. In the meantime, you can read synopses of the presentations from written by Andrew, official liveblogger of Web Directions South.

September 30th, 2005

Ipod My Baby

Cute baby wear for geek parents.

He comes from a land down under

The podcasts and the photos have started coming in from Web Essentials in Syndey. Oh, how I wish I could be there!

But if I can’t go to Australia, I can still bring an Australian to me.

As I was browsing through photos from my contacts on Flickr, I noticed that Daniel Boud was posting pictures from England. A quick browse of his website revealed his itinerary. I noticed that he had a few free days this week so I invited him down to Brighton.

Dan was a charming and gracious guest. I endeavoured to show him the sights of Brighton to provide fodder by his camera. Despite our best efforts, we couldn’t get arrested (or even stopped and searched) for taking pictures of the Labour Party conference. I did manage to get him to a small, thrashy, noisy gig by some Swedish riot grrrls. He fitted right in.

Dan is off to New York next and San Francisco after that. If you live in either of those places and you’d like to meet a charming antipodeon blogger who happens to be a supremely talented photographer, drop him a line (his email address is on his website).

September 30th, 2003

WiFi Regained

Remember how I was saying that the wireless reception in my iBook went all screwy a while back? Well, I sent the iBook off to Apple so that they could have a look at it.

In their usual efficient way they promptly repaired it and sent it back (still under warranty so there was no charge). Now I have wireless access once again.

It feels like having a whole new machine. I really, really missed not being able to surf the web wirelessly and hang out at local hotspots. The airport card may seem like a relatively minor part of an iBook but when it wasn’t working I missed it more than I missed my CD tray when that broke on my old iBook.

September 30th, 2002

Anniversary

I have been blogging now for exactly one year.

As Kermit the frog once said, time sure is fun when you’re having flies.

To celebrate my blogging anniversary, I’ve added an extra little feature to the archive list. There’s a link that points to journal entries from a year ago to the day.

Actually, this is mostly for my benefit. I find it fascinating to read what I was thinking about 365 days ago.

dooce

Rejoice! For Heather Hamilton is back.

I’m beginning to think that blogging is like an addictive substance. You can try to give it up but you’ll always come back to it.

Just how long do you think you can last without it, Derek?

JCPenney

Jessica refuses to believe that JCPenney are actually selling the "Forward Command Post" model in their catalogue:

"Take command of your soldiers from this fully outfitted battlezone. 75-piece set includes one 111/2"H figurine in military combat gear, toy weapons, American flag, chairs and more."

It’s like a doll’s house but a bombed-out doll’s house.

September 30th, 2001

Welcome to my world

This is my first entry in my first online journal.

I’m not quite sure what to say. I’m not quite sure what I will be saying here over the coming days, weeks, months and years.

I think it’s safe to assume an "anything goes" attitude for what I post here. Being a web developer, there’s bound to be lots of geeky, techy stuff but I also want a place where I can rant and rave about life in general.

I hope I can strike a balance between having an honest, open journal and having a journal filled with boring, innane details about my life. Time will tell.

I’ll try and post fairly regularly but I don’t want to make any promises I can’t keep. Hopefully, I’ll be updating the journal on a daily basis.

Anyway, let’s see what happens. I hope you’ll like it.