Introducing Resilient Web Design

I wrote a thing. The thing is a book. But the book is not published on paper. This book is on the web. It’s a web book. Or “wook” if you prefer …please don’t prefer. Here it is:

Resilient Web Design.

It’s yours for free.

Much of the subject matter will be familiar if you’ve seen my conference talks from the past couple of years, particularly Enhance! and Resilience. But the book ended up taking some twists and turns that surprised me. It turned out to be a bit of a history book: the history of design, the history of the web.

Resilient Web Design is a short book. It’s between sixteen and seventeen megawords long. You could read the whole thing in a couple of hours. Or—because the book has seven chapters—you could take fifteen to twenty minutes out of a day to read one chapter and you’d have read the whole thing done in a week.

If you make websites in any capacity, I hope that this book will resonate with you. Even if you don’t make websites, I still hope there’s an interesting story in there for you.

You can read the whole book on the web, but if you’d rather have a single file to carry around, I’ve made some PDFs as well: one in portrait, one in landscape.

I’ve licensed the book quite liberally. It’s released under a Creative Commons attribution share-alike licence. That means you can re-use the material in any way you want (even commercial usage) as long as you provide some attribution and use the same licence. So if you’d like to release the book in some other format like ePub or anything, go for it.

I’m currently making an audio version of Resilient Web Design. I’ll be releasing it one chapter at a time as a podcast. Here’s the RSS feed if you want to subscribe to it. Or you can subscribe directly from iTunes.

I took my sweet time writing this book. I wrote the first chapter in March 2015. I wrote the last chapter in May 2016. Then I sat on it for a while, figuring out what to do with it. Eventually I decided to just put the whole thing up on the web—it seems fitting.

Whereas the writing took over a year of solid procrastination, making the website went surprisingly quickly. After one weekend of marking up and styling, I had most of it ready to go. Then I spent a while tweaking. The source files are on Github.

I’m pretty happy with the end result. I’ll write a bit more about some of the details over the next while—the typography, the offline functionality, print styles, and stuff like that. In the meantime, I hope you’ll peruse this little book at your leisure…

Resilient Web Design.

If you like it, please spread the word.

Have you published a response to this? :

Responses

Webrocker

Jeremy Keith has published a new book, and anyone who’s enjoyed one of his recent talks about the build-in robustness of the core web technologies, and how we managed to cripple it by designing with the wrong focus, might want to read this. I certainly do, this is very much up my alley.

With a title like Resilient Web Design, you might think that this is a handbook for designing robust websites. This is not a handbook. It’s more like a history book. (…) You won’t find any code in here to help you build better websites. But you will find ideas and approaches. Ideas are more resilient than code. I’ve tried to combine the most resilient ideas from the history of web design into an approach for building the websites of the future.

resilientwebdesign.com

A nice thing, too: The ‘book’ is published on the web. It is a webpage. Like old school. But it is an ‘ebook’ of sorts as well, since the site sports https and a service worker and his magic js elves, and so this ‘webbook’ can be read offline, to. And be ‘installed’ on your mobile device’s home screen, on some operating systems. So not only is this content published on the web, but also a glimpse into what a ‘website’ can offer, if done right. If you want to sell this to marketing, call it a ‘Progressive Web App’, because everyone wants an App, right? :-)

Status: Read

# Posted by Webrocker on Wednesday, December 14th, 2016 at 6:00am

cdevroe.com

Jeremy Keith:

Resilient Web Design is a short book. It’s between sixteen and seventeen megawords long. You could read the whole thing in a couple of hours. Or—because the book has seven chapters—you could take fifteen to twenty minutes out of a day to read one chapter and you’d have read the whole thing done in a week.

Can’t beat the price. I’ve already dug in a little. Hoping to dig in a bit more during this snowy weekend.

# Friday, December 16th, 2016 at 4:59pm