Pattern Libraries, Performance, and Progressive Web Apps

Ever since its founding in 2005, Clearleft has been laser-focused on user experience design.

But we’ve always maintained a strong front-end development arm. The front-end development work at Clearleft is always in service of design. Over the years we’ve built up a wealth of expertise on using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to make better user experiences.

Recently we’ve been doing a lot of strategic design work—the really in-depth long-term engagements that begin with research and continue through to design consultancy and collaboration. That means we’ve got availability for front-end development work. Whether it’s consultancy or production work you’re looking for, this could be a good opportunity for us to work together.

There are three particular areas of front-end expertise we’re obsessed with…

Pattern Libraries

We caught the design systems bug years ago, way back when Natalie started pioneering pattern libraries as our primary deliverable (or pattern portfolios, as we called them then). This approach has proven effective time and time again. We’ve spent years now refining our workflow and thinking around modular design. Fractal is the natural expression of this obsession. Danielle and Mark have been working flat-out on version 2. They’re very eager to share everything they’ve learned along the way …and help others put together solid pattern libraries.

Danielle Huntrods Mark Perkins

Performance

Thinking about it, it’s no surprise that we’re crazy about performance at Clearleft. Like I said, our focus on user experience, and when it comes to user experience on the web, nothing but nothing is more important than performance. The good news is that the majority of performance fixes can be done on the front end—images, scripts, fonts …it’s remarkable how much a good front-end overhaul can make to the bottom line. That’s what Graham has been obsessing over.

Graham Smith

Progressive Web Apps

Over the years I’ve found myself getting swept up in exciting new technologies on the web. When Clearleft first formed, my head was deep into DOM Scripting and Ajax. Half a decade later it was HTML5. Now it’s service workers. I honestly think it’s a technology that could be as revolutionary as Ajax or HTML5 (maybe I should write a book to that effect).

I’ve been talking about service workers at conferences this year, and I can’t hide my excitement:

There’s endless possibilities of what you can do with this technology. It’s very powerful.

Combine a service worker with a web app manifest and you’ve got yourself a Progressive Web App. It’s not just a great marketing term—it’s an opportunity for the web to truly excel at delivering the kind of user experiences previously only associated with native apps.

Jeremy Keith

I’m very very keen to work with companies and organisations that want to harness the power of service workers and Progressive Web Apps. If that’s you, get in touch.

Whether it’s pattern libraries, performance, or Progressive Web Apps, we’ve got the skills and expertise to share with you.

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# Liked by Gunnar Bittersmann on Monday, October 23rd, 2017 at 6:36am

Previously on this day

5 years ago I wrote A question of markup

Choosing the right HTML elements: why bother?

7 years ago I wrote A treat grows in Brooklyn

Brooklyn Beta 2012. Good times.

9 years ago I wrote Crowdscribing

A transcript courtesy of Twitter.

17 years ago I wrote RSS Validator

Mark Pilgrim and Sam Ruby have released an RSS validator. This coincides nicely with the fact that I’ve just updated my RSS feed from using version 0.92 to version 1.0.

17 years ago I wrote The ElectriClerk

Remember those wonderfully retro computing devices from Terry Gilliam’s Brazil?

18 years ago I wrote The Mirror Project | Jeremy Keith | After Dinner

Jessica and I had dinner with Chris and Karin upstairs last night. Jessica cooked up some nice roast vegetables to go with the delicious kaese spaetzle that Karin made.

18 years ago I wrote Oct. 11-12, 2001 Aurora Gallery

Here’s some eyecandy for you: Aurora Borealis on the nights of October 11th and 12th.