Spam of the Gods

Stephen Hawking has been quoted recently urging caution about the prospect of first contact with an extra-terrestrial civilisation:

We only have to look at ourselves to see how intelligent life might develop into something we wouldn’t want to meet.

This isn’t the first time that such reservations have been raised.

Both of the Voyager spacecraft are carrying ; snapshots and time capsules of our planet’s culture—a project with such a long timeline that it makes the clock of the Long Now look like a disposable gadget in comparison. As well as carrying instructions on how to decode the record—ingeniously using the fundamental transition of a hydrogen atom as the base unit of time—the records also have a map inscribed upon them. This is the same illustration that was included with .

The map consists of fourteen lines converging on a central point. The length and angle of each line corresponds to the position of a pulsar relative to Earth. Those fourteen beacons point to one position in the galaxy: our home planet.

The responsibility for deciding the contents of the golden record fell to Carl Sagan. I highly recommend listening to this account by Sagan’s widow Ann Druyan of how the golden record may just contain the encoded patterns of love itself:

Carl Sagan And Ann Druyan’s Ultimate Mix Tape on Huffduffer

Many people at the time were upset that the pulsar map was included on the Voyager record, for the same reasons that Hawking is giving today: we are effectively hanging a sign around our neck that reads free food here.

I was talking about this with Tantek at South by Southwest this year and he had to admit that, with his Schneier-esque security hat on, those people have a point. What you really want to do, he said, is point to a drop-off box instead: a nearby uninhabited star-system that we can monitor from Earth. That way, if we ascertain that the alien civilisation is friendly, we can go and greet them but if they are hostile, we can simply lay low.

In fact, in Sagan’s book Contact—where the shoe is on the other foot and we are the alien civilisation responding to a message—this is exactly what happens. The origin point we are given is the Vega system, which turns out not to be the home of any alien civilisation but merely a way station: a routing point in the galactic network.

There may well be a galactic RFC for , which the Pioneer and Voyager probes have flagrantly disregarded. What is an alien civilisation to make of a message that effectively states:

Dear Friend,
Although you may be apprehensive as we have not met before, I come to you with great hope. I am a probe from an abundant planet that has recently acquired spacefaring technology. Please contact me at your earliest convenience so that we may transfer knowledge.
I await your response,
Third planet from an insignificant star

It’s clearly a designed to lure in the gullible of the galaxy.

Carl Sagan, my hero, looks like nothing more than a galactic .

Have you published a response to this? :

Previously on this day

12 years ago I wrote Accessibility 2.0

The closing panel at the Accessibility 2.0 conference.

12 years ago I wrote Tools and Technologies to Watch and Avoid

A presentation by Ian Forrester at the Accessibility 2.0 conference.

12 years ago I wrote A case study: Building a social network for disabled users

A presentation by Stephen Eisden at the Accessibility 2.0 conference.

12 years ago I wrote User-generated Content

A presentation by Jonathan Hassell at the Accessibility 2.0 conference.

12 years ago I wrote Rich Media and Web applications for people with learning disabilities

A presentation by Antonia Hyde at the Accessibility 2.0 conference.

12 years ago I wrote Fencing in the Habitat

A presentation by Christian Heilmann at the Accessibility 2.0 conference.

12 years ago I wrote Making Twitter Tweet

A presentation by Steve Faulkner at the Accessibility 2.0 conference.

13 years ago I wrote Identity and authority

Trust is not an algorithm.

14 years ago I wrote Print stylesheets

Some advice for presenting your content on the printed page.

17 years ago I wrote On the beach

Oh, dear. Brighton doesn’t fare too well in one man’s mission to rate the beaches of the world:

17 years ago I wrote Design vs. syndication

This site has been getting mentioned in some good company lately.

17 years ago I wrote Design vs. legibility

The Designer is a very pretty looking site that publishes a PDF design magazine.