The forgotten house

The Never Forgotten House is a beautifully-written piece with a central premise that is utterly, utterly flawed. Once again the truism that “the internet never forgets” is presented as though it needed no verification.

Someday soon, the internet will fulfill its promise as a time machine. It will provide images for every space and moment so we can fact check our memories. Flickr and Facebook albums will only accumulate.

Citation needed. Badly.

Read the article. Enjoy it. But question its unquestioningness. It made me sad for exactly the opposite reasons that the author intended.

Every essential moment of a child’s life is documented if he was born in the West. With digital album after album for every birthday, every Christmas, he will never struggle to remember what his childhood home looked like.

I wish that were true.

Have you published a response to this? :

Previously on this day

13 years ago I wrote Flash On The Beach: day one

Art, code and business on one bill.

14 years ago I wrote Writing for the Web

There’s a wonderful article over on Digital Web called "Resurrect Your Writing, Redeem Your Soul". It’s all about how to write well, especially on the Web, and it’s the very antithesis of Nielsen’s checklist approach.

18 years ago I wrote KPMG

I’m linking to kpmg.com because I can.

18 years ago I wrote "Goner" Worm

Here’s a fairly neutral report on a new worm that’s doing some damage.

18 years ago I wrote A web of visions

I was just over at the BBC website reading this article about Joshua Davis and his inclusion in the current exhibition at the Design Museum.