Brad has done a great job in documenting navigation patterns for responsive designs. More recently I came across Erick Arbé’s similar collection of patterns for responsive navigation. And, of course, at the Responsive Day Out, David gave a presentation on the subject.

David Bushell: Responsive Navigation on Huffduffer

As I mentioned in the chat after David’s talk, choosing a pattern doesn’t need to be an either/or decision. You can start with a simple solution and progressively enhance to a more complex navigation pattern.

Take the footer-anchor pattern, for example. I really, really like this pattern. It doesn’t require any JavaScript whatsoever; just a simple hyperlink from the top of the page that links to the fragment identifier of the navigation at the bottom of the page. It works on just about every device.

But you don’t have to stop there. Now that you’ve got a simple solution that works everywhere, you can enhance it for more capable browsers.

Take a look at this example that applies the off-canvas pattern for browsers capable of handling the JavaScript and CSS required.

You can see the two patterns in action by looking at the source in JS Bin. If you toggle the “Auto-run JS” checkbox, you can see both behaviours. Without JavaScript you get the footer-anchor pattern. With JavaScript (and a capable browser) you get the off-canvas pattern.

I haven’t applied any media queries in this instance, but it would be pretty straightforward to apply absolute positioning or the display: table hack to display the navigation by default at wider screen sizes. I’ll leave that as an exercise for the reader (bonus points: apply the off-canvas from the right of the viewport rather than the left).

Feel free to peruse the somewhat simplistic code. I’m doing a bit of feature detection—or cutting the mustard—to test for querySelector and addEventListener. If a browser passes the test, a class is applied to the document root and some JavaScript is executed on page load to toggle the off-canvas behaviour.

On a recent project, I found myself implementing a number of different navigation patterns: off-canvas, overlay, and progressive disclosure. But each one began as an instance of the simple footer-anchor pattern.

Progressive enhancement, baby. Still not dead, still important.

Have you published a response to this? :