Tags: ampersand

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Full Meaning Ampersand

In the space of one week, Brighton played host to three excellent conferences:

  1. FF Conf on Friday, November 6th,
  2. Meaning on Thursday, November 12th, and
  3. Ampersand on Friday, November 13th.

I made it to two of the three—alas, I couldn’t make it to Meaning this year because it clashed with Richard’s superb workshop on Responsive Web Typography.

FF Conf and Ampersand were both superb. Despite having very different subject matter, the two events have a lot in common. They’re both affordable, one-day, single-track, focused gatherings.

Both events really benefit from having a mastermind overseeing the line-up: Remy in the case of FF Conf, and Richard in the case of Ampersand. That really paid off. Both events were superbly curated, with a diverse mix of speakers and topics.

It was really interesting to see both conferences break out of the boundary of what happens inside web browsers. At FF Conf, we were treated to talks on linguistics and inclusivity. At Ampersand, we enjoyed talks on physiology and culture. But of course we also had the really deep dives into the minutest details of JavaScript, SVG, typography, and layout.

Videos will be available from FF Conf, and audio will be available from Ampersand. Be sure to check them out once they’re released.

Marcy Sutton FFConf 2015 Playing to be different marks with Marcin

Eventful

The weather is glorious right now here in Brighton. As much as I get wanderlust, I’m more than happy to have been here for most of June and for this lovely July thus far.

Prior to the J months, I made a few European sojourns.

Mid-may was Mobilism time in Amsterdam, although it might turn out that this may have been the final year. That would be a real shame: it’s a great conference, and this year’s was no exception.

As usual, I had a lot of fun moderating a panel. This time it was a general “hot topics” panel featuring Remy, Jake, Wilto, and Dan. Smart, opinionated people: just what I want.

Two weeks after Mobilism, I was back on the continent for Beyond Tellerrand in Düsseldorf. I opened up the show with a new talk. It was quite ranty, but I was pleased with how it turned out, and the audience were very receptive. I’ll see about getting the video transcribed so I can publish the full text here.

Alas, I had to miss the second day of the conference so I could down to Porto for this year’s ESAD web talks, where I reprised the talk I had just debuted in Germany. It was my first time in Portugal and I really liked Porto: there’s a lot to explore and discover there.

Two weeks after that, I gave that same talk one last spin at FFWD.pro in Zagreb. I had never been to Croatia before and Jessica and I wanted to make the most of it, so we tagged on a trip to Dubrovnik. That was quite wonderful. It’s filled with tourists these days, but with good reason: it’s a beautiful medieval place.

With that, my little European getaways came to an end (for now). The only other conference I attended was Brighton’s own Ampersand, which was particularly fun this year. The Clearleft conferences just keep getting better and better.

In fact, this year’s Ampersand might have been the best yet. And this year’s UX London was definitely the best yet. I’d love to say that this year’s dConstruct will be the best yet, but given that last year’s was without doubt the best conference I’ve ever been to, that’s going to be quite a tall order.

Still, with this line-up, I reckon it’s going to be pretty darn great …and it will certainly be good fun. So if you haven’t yet done so, grab a ticket now and I’ll see you here in Brighton in September.

Here’s hoping the weather stays good.

Ampersanded

Remember when I said that the Ampersand conference was going to be great? Yeah, well, I wasn’t wrong. If anything, I underestimated how great it would be.

Tim Brown Vincent listens to Jason John Daggett Mark

Make a venn diagram of web nerds and type nerds; Ampersand was all about the intersection of those two circles. There was something special about having so many domain-specific nerds in one place at one time. It made for a very special atmosphere. It also helped that all the speakers were excellent. I particularly liked the fact that Ethan’s book was pimped in four different talks.

You can read more about the individual talks in an article over at Eye Magazine called Web typography comes of age at Brighton’s Ampersand conference.

All in all, it was an excellent day. The only bittersweet note came from the fact that it marked Sophie’s last day at Clearleft—she’s off to Lanyrd. But Sophie left us on a high note: she and Rich put together one hell of an event.

Sophie

Ampersand

What with all the overseas travelling I’ve been doing lately, I’m quite looking forward to going to some conferences here in the UK. I’m definitely looking forward to Web Directions @media in London later this month and DIBI in Newcastle next month although there’s something about both events that troubles me: they’re both double-track conferences, splitting the talks into “design” and “development” categories.

Don’t get me wrong—I think the line-ups look great. But that’s just the problem. I know I’m going to have make some very hard choices when two excellent speakers are on at exactly the same time. It’s a guarantee that I’ll have strong feelings of FOMO.

Personally, I’d rather not have to make those decisions. That’s one of the reasons why I really like the single-track format of dConstruct and An Event Apart. I think that the playlist-like curated single-day line-up of events like Build and New Adventures In Web Design really contributes to their special atmosphere.

The single-track single-day format works especially well for tightly-focused conferences like the JavaScriptastic Full Frontal.

If you’re looking for a single-track, single-day conference devoted entirely to typography on the web, then you simply must get along to Ampersand right here in Brighton on June 17th.

Yes, I am biased: we at Clearleft are organising it, but if you’ve been to any of our other events—dConstruct or UX London—you know that we kick ass when it comes to crafting conferences.

To say that I’m excited about Ampersand would be an understatement. I mean, come on! A day of font geekery with speakers like Jon Tan, Tim Brown, David Berlow and Jonathan Hoefler …it’s going to be typography heaven! It’s also a good excuse for you to come on down to Brighton at the start of a Summer weekend …and you could stick around for the typography tour around town with Phil Baines the next day.

There are some other reasons you should register for Ampersand:

Oh, and if you’re a student …it’s half price. Not that the price is much of a limiting factor: a mere £125 is pretty excellent value for such a great line-up.

So book your place and we can get together for a beer—either at the pre-party or the after-party—and we can geek out about typography on the web together.

Amperbbreviations

Twitter doesn’t allow for much verbosity but sometimes it’s possible to squeeze some code into 140 characters or fewer. I particularly like Simon’s piece of JavaScript. Paste this into the address bar in Safari:

javascript:(function(){var d=0;setInterval(function()
{document.body.style['-webkit-transform']=
'rotate('+ d +'deg)';d+=1},10)}());

Earlier today, I wrote:

Writing <abbr title="and">&amp;</abbr> in my markup and abbr[title='and'] { font-family: Baskerville; font-style: italic; } in my CSS.

This is something that Dan has written about in the past, citing Bringhurst; In heads and titles, use the best available ampersand. Dan suggested wrapping ampersands in a span with a class of “amp” but in a comment, I proposed using the abbr element:

<abbr title="and" class="amp">&amp;</abbr>

But really, you don’t even need the class because you can just use an attribute selector:

abbr[title='and'] {
 font-family: Baskerville, Palatino, "Book Antiqua", serif;
 font-style: italic;
}

But, asks Mat Marquis, what about a certain browser that can’t even handle the simplest of attribute selectors? Won’t IE666 still need a class attribute?

Well, it turns out that you can’t style the abbr element in the Browser of the Beast with or without a class attribute. That’s because Internet Explorer didn’t support the abbr element until version 8 (and yet people scoff at the 2022 date for two complete HTML5 implementations). If you want to slap some sense into earlier versions of IE, you can always use a smattering of DOM Scripting.

Bruce wonders:

Is there not some JS that can quietly add class=”and” when it sees an ampersand in a text node ?

Turns out that Ted has already written a script to do that.

If you want to be a real stickler, Erik Vorhes keeps his tongue firmly in cheek with this suggestion:

<abbr title="et" lang="la">&amp;</abbr>