Tags: analytics

2

sparkline

Analytical

When I was talking about Huffduffer, I mentioned that I don’t have any analytics set up for the site:

To be honest, I’m okay with that—one of the perks of having a personal project is that only metric that really matters is your own satisfaction.

For a while, I did have Google Analytics set up on The Session. But I started to feel a bit uncomfortable about willingly opening up a wormhole between my site and the Google mothership. It bothered me that Adblock Plus would show that one ad had been blocked on the site. There are no ads on the site, but the presence of the Google Analytics code was providing valuable information to Google—and its advertiser customer base—so I can understand why it gets flagged up like any other unwanted tracking.

Theoretically, users have a way of opting out of this kind of tracking by switching on the Do Not Track header (if it isn’t switched on by default). Looking at the default JavaScript code that Google provides for setting up Google Analytics, I don’t see any mention of navigator.doNotTrack.

Now, it may well be that Google sniffs for that header (and abandons any tracking) when its server is pinged via the analytics code, but there’s no way to tell from this side of the Googleplex. I certainly don’t see any mention of it in the JavaScript that gets inserted into our web pages.

I was wondering whether it makes sense to explictly check for the doNotTrack header before opening up that connection to google-analytics.com via a generated script element.

So if the current code looks like:

<script>
// generate a script element
// point it to google-analytics.com
</script>

Would it make sense to wrap it with some kind of test for navigator.doNotTrack:

<script>
if (!navigator.doNotTrack || navigator.doNotTrack != 'yes') {
// generate a script element
// point it to google-analytics.com
}
</script>

For the love of mercy, don’t actually use that code—it’s completely untested and probably causes more harm than good. But you can see the idea that I’m trying to get at, right? Google Analytics most definitely counts as tracking so it seems like the ideal use-case for Do Not Track.

It raises a few questions:

  1. Is anyone doing this already? It might well be that the answer is “no”, not because of any reluctance to respect user preferences but because the doNotTrack spec is very much in flux.
  2. Would you consider doing this?
  3. If you were to do this, could you foresee getting pushback from within your own company?

Huffduff up and up

I had a nice Skype chat with Stan Alcorn yesterday all about Huffduffer, online sharing of audio, and all things podcasty and radioish. I’m sure I must have talked his ear off.

Stan was asking about numbers for Huffduffer’s user base and activity. I have to admit that I’ve got zero analytics running on the site. To be honest, I’m okay with that—one of the perks of having a personal project is that only metric that really matters is your own satisfaction. But I told Stan I’d run some quick database queries to get some feeling for Huffduffer’s usage patterns. Here’s what I found…

There are 5,862 people signed up to Huffduffer.

About 150,919 items have been huffduffed. But those aren’t unique files. The total number of distinct files that have been huffduffed is 5,972. That means that, on average, an audio file is huffduffed around 26 times. And the average user has huffduffed around 30 items. But neither of those distributions would be evenly distributed; they’d be power-law distributions rather than bell curves. For example, the most popular file was huffduffed 329 times.

Looking at the amount of items huffduffed each year, there’s a pleasing upward trend.

1st year 7,382
2nd year 19,080
3rd year 23,403
4th year 31,808
5th year 41,514

I was pleasantly surprised by this. I would’ve assumed that Huffduffer usage would be more of a steady-state affair, but it looks like the site is getting used a bit more with each passing year (the site is currently in its sixth(!) year).

Not that any of that really matters. I built Huffduffer to scratch my own itch. I huffduff an average of 411 audio files each year. So even if nobody else used Huffduffer, it would still provide plenty of value to me.

Like I was saying to Stan, the biggest strength and the biggest weakness of audio—as opposed to text or video—is that you can listen to it while your doing other things. For some people, car journeys are the perfect podcast time. For others, it might be doing the dishes or train journeys. For me, it’s the walk to and from work each day—it takes about 35 minutes each way, and I catch up on my Huffduffer feed during that time.

Jessica and I will often listen to some spoken word audio in the background during dinner—usually something quite radio-y like Radiolab, or NPR stories. Yesterday, we were catching up with Aleks’s BBC documentary series, The Digital Human. It was the episode about voice.

Imagine my surprise when I heard the voice of Stan Alcorn. What a co-inky-dink!