Tags: firefox



Plug in and huffduff

Beer o’clock in Brighton begins shortly after work ends on a Friday evening. That’s when the geeks of Brighton unshackle themselves from their keyboards and monitors to congregate in a pub. If the weather is good, it’ll be a sunny pub. Last friday the Clearlefties descended on The Eagle where we were joined by Ribotians and others.

Glenn showed up and we proceeded to geek out on our usual favourite topics; microformats and data portability. He had spent the day hacking on a Firefox plug-in. If you haven’t tried his Identify extension, do yourself a favour and install it—it’s quite astounding.

I mentioned that I had tried to hack together my own Firefox extension for Huffduffer but was thwarted by my lack of skill in reverse-engineering and penetrating the documentation. I wanted to provide a fairly simple behaviour: right-click on a link to an audio file and select an option to huffduff it.

Two days later I got an email from Glenn with a file attached …a Firefox extension he built for huffduffing. Fantastic!

I hacked around with the JavaScript a little bit (adding a check to make sure the hyperlink being right-clicked was pointing to an audio file) and added Huffduffer icons from Paul’s icon set. Meanwhile Glenn added a little touch of genius; using Firefox’s built-in microformats parser to check for values on the page and pre-fill the Huffduffer form with them.

Anyway, grab the Huffduffer Firefox plug-in for yourself and give it a whirl.

Next time it’s beer o’clock in Brighton, I owe Glenn a beer.


There’s been some really interesting stuff coming out of Mozilla Labs lately. The latest toy is a plugin called Geode.

It’s based on the W3C editor’s draft geolocation API. In a nutshell, it allows you to provide your location to a website at the click of a button. You can try it for yourself on Pownce.

Now, I have no idea where it’s getting the location data from—probably a mixture of WiFi and network information a la Plazes—but I don’t need to know or care. What’s important is that it works. It works to such an extent that it’s close to being indistinguishable from magic. Sitting in the Clearleft office at 28 Kensington Street in Brighton, Geode updated my Pownce location as 9 Kensington Street in Brighton. That’s pretty damn close.

Little by little, we’re getting there:

I look forward to the day when geostamps are as ubiquitous as timestamps. If every image, every blog post, every video, every sound file had a longitude and latitude as well as a date and time… I can’t even begin to imagine the possibilities that would open up.

Microformats 1:01—Exporting microformats via bluetooth

On the last day of XTech 2007 I abducted Ian and forced him to shoot a quick video of a microformats demo that I didn’t have a chance to include in my presentation.

The video is one minute and one second long. It’s a quick demo of John McKerrell’s bluetooth version of the Tails plugin.


Here’s a transcript of the 1:01 minutes of video:

This is my website. This is my mobile phone. My website has microformats. This is a version of the Tails plugin for Firefox. It exposes all the microformats I have on my website. I can convert and export those microformats as vcard, iCal, whatever I want. With this version of the plugin I can also export to bluetooth. So let’s take an event for example. I click on bluetooth. My computer asks me which device to export to. I have previously paired up my phone. So now I’m going to send the event to that device. And there we go. I have now exported from the World Wide Web onto my mobile phone. Easy!

The video is released under a Creative Commons attribution license. You are free to share, remix, caption and translate this video (as long as you provide attribution).