Tags: interaction

11

sparkline

Pseudo and pseudon’t

I like CSS pseudo-classes. They come in handy for adding little enhancements to interfaces based on interaction.

Take the form-related pseudo-classes, for example: :valid, :invalid, :required, :in-range, and many more.

Let’s say I want to adjust the appearance of an element based on whether it has been filled in correctly. I might have an input element like this:

<input type="email" required>

Then I can write some CSS to put green border on it once it meets the minimum requirements for validity:

input:valid {
  border: 1px solid green;
}

That works, but somewhat annoyingly, the appearance will change while the user is still typing in the field (as soon as the user types an @ symbol, the border goes green). That can be distracting, or downright annoying.

I only want to display the green border when the input is valid and the field is not focused. Luckily for me, those last two words (“not focused”) map nicely to some more pseudo-classes: not and focus:

input:not(:focus):valid {
  border: 1px solid green;
}

If I want to get really fancy, I could display an icon next to form fields that have been filled in. But to do that, I’d need more than a pseudo-class; I’d need a pseudo-element, like :after

input:not(:focus):valid::after {
  content: '✓';
}

…except that won’t work. It turns out that you can’t add generated content to replaced elements like form fields. I’d have to add a regular element into my markup, like this:

<input type="email" required>
<span></span>

So I could style it with:

input:not(:focus):valid + span::after {
  content: '✓';
}

But that feels icky.

Update: See this clever flexbox technique by Hugo Giraudel for a potential solution.

A question of timing

I’ve been updating my collection of design principles lately, adding in some more examples from Android and Windows. Coincidentally, Vasilis unveiled a neat little page that grabs one list of principles at random —just keep refreshing to see more.

I also added this list of seven principles of rich web applications to the collection, although they feel a bit more like engineering principles than design principles per se. That said, they’re really, really good. Every single one is rooted in performance and the user’s experience, not developer convenience.

Don’t get me wrong: developer convenience is very, very important. Nobody wants to feel like they’re doing unnecessary work. But I feel very strongly that the needs of the end user should trump the needs of the developer in almost all instances (you may feel differently and that’s absolutely fine; we’ll agree to differ).

That push and pull between developer convenience and user experience is, I think, most evident in the first principle: server-rendered pages are not optional. Now before you jump to conclusions, the author is not saying that you should never do client-side rendering, but instead points out the very important performance benefits of having the server render the initial page. After that—if the user’s browser cuts the mustard—you can use client-side rendering exclusively.

The issue with that hybrid approach—as I’ve discussed before—is that it’s hard. Isomorphic JavaScript (terrible name) can theoretically help here, but I haven’t seen too many examples of it in action. I suspect that’s because this approach doesn’t yet offer enough developer convenience.

Anyway, I found myself nodding along enthusiastically with that first of seven design principles. Then I got to the second one: act immediately on user input. That sounds eminently sensible, and it’s backed up with sound reasoning. But it finishes with:

Techniques like PJAX or TurboLinks unfortunately largely miss out on the opportunities described in this section.

Ah. See, I’m a big fan of PJAX. It’s essentially the same thing as the Hijax technique I talked about many years ago in Bulletproof Ajax, but with the new addition of HTML5’s History API. It’s a quick’n’dirty way of giving the illusion of a fat client: all the work is actually being done in the server, which sends back chunks of HTML that update the interface. But it’s true that, because of that round-trip to the server, there’s a bit of a delay and so you often end up briefly displaying a loading indicator.

I contend that spinners or “loading indicators” should become a rarity

I agree …but I also like using PJAX/Hijax. Now how do I reconcile what’s best for the user experience with what’s best for my own developer convenience?

I’ve come up with a compromise, and you can see it in action on The Session. There are multiple examples of PJAX in action on that site, like pretty much any page that returns paginated results: new tune settings, the latest events, and so on. The steps for initiating an Ajax request used to be:

  1. Listen for any clicks on the page,
  2. If a “previous” or “next” button is clicked, then:
  3. Display a loading indicator,
  4. Request the new data from the server, and
  5. Update the page with the new data.

In one sense, I am acting immediately to user input, because I always display the loading indicator straight away. But because the loading indicator always appears, no matter how fast or slow the server responds, it sometimes only appears very briefly—just for a flash. In that situation, I wonder if it’s serving any purpose. It might even be doing the opposite to its intended purpose—it draws attention to the fact that there’s a round-trip to the server.

“What if”, I asked myself, “I only showed the loading indicator if the server is taking too long to send a response back?”

The updated flow now looks like this:

  1. Listen for any clicks on the page,
  2. If a “previous” or “next” button is clicked, then:
  3. Start a timer, and
  4. Request the new data from the server.
  5. If the timer reaches an upper limit, show a loading indicator.
  6. When the server sends a response, cancel the timer and
  7. Update the page with the new data.

Even though there are more steps, there’s actually less happening from the user’s perspective. Where previously you would experience this:

  1. I click on a button,
  2. I briefly see a loading indicator,
  3. I see the new data.

Now your experience is:

  1. I click on a button,
  2. I see the new data.

…unless the server or the network is taking too long, in which case the loading indicator appears as an interim step.

The question is: how long is too long? How long do I wait before showing the loading indicator?

The Nielsen Norman group offers this bit of research:

0.1 second is about the limit for having the user feel that the system is reacting instantaneously, meaning that no special feedback is necessary except to display the result.

So I should set my timer to 100 milliseconds. In practice, I found that I can set it to as high as 200 to 250 milliseconds and keep it feeling very close to instantaneous. Anything over that, though, and it’s probably best to display a loading indicator: otherwise the interface starts to feel a little sluggish, and slightly uncanny. (“Did that click do any—? Oh, it did.”)

You can test the response time by looking at some of the simpler pagination examples on The Session: new recordings or new discussions, for example. To see examples of when the server takes a bit longer to send a response, you can try paginating through search results. These take longer because, frankly, I’m not very good at optimising some of those search queries.

There you have it: an interface that—under optimal conditions—reacts to user input instantaneously, but falls back to displaying a loading indicator when conditions are less than ideal. The result is something that feels like a client-side web thang, even though the actual complexity is on the server.

Now to see what else I can learn from the rest of those design principles.

Double tap delay

Even though my encounter with Ted yesterday was brief, we still managed to turn the conversation to browsers, standards, and all things web in our brief chat.

Specifically, we talked about this proposal in Blink related to the 300 millisecond delay that mobile browsers introduce after a tap event.

Why do browsers have this 300 millisecond delay? Well, you know when you’re looking at fixed-width desktop-based website on a mobile phone, and everything is zoomed out, and one of the ways that you can zoom in to a specific portion of the page is to double tap on that content? A double tap is defined as two taps less than 300 milliseconds apart. So whenever you tap on something in a touch-based browser, it needs to wait for that length of time to see if you’re going to turn that single tap into a double tap.

The overall effect is that tap actions feel a little bit laggy on the web compared to native apps. You can fix this by using the fastclick code from FT Labs, but I always feel weird solving a problem on mobile by throwing more front-end code at it.

Hence the Blink proposal: if the author has used a meta viewport declaration to set width=device-width (effectively saying “hey, I know what I’m doing: this content doesn’t need to be zoomed”), then the 300 millisecond delay could be removed from tap events. Note: this only affects double taps—pinch zoom is unaffected.

This sounds like a sensible idea to me, but Ted says that he sometimes still likes to double tap to zoom even in responsive designs. He’d prefer a per-element solution rather than a per-document meta element. An attribute? Or maybe a CSS declaration similar to pointer events?

I thought for a minute, and then I spitballed this idea: what if the 300 millisecond delay only applied to non-focusable elements?

After all, the tap delay is only noticeable when you’re trying to tap on a focusable element: links, buttons, form fields. Double tapping tends to happen on text content: divs, paragraphs, sections. That’s assuming you are actually using buttons and links for buttons and links—not spans or divs a-la Google.

And if the author decides they want to remove the tap delay on a non-focusable element, they can always make it focusable by adding tabindex=-1 (if that still works …does that still work? I don’t even know any more).

Anyway, that was my not-very-considered idea, but on first pass, it doesn’t strike me as being obviously stupid or crazy.

So, how about it, browser makers? Does removing the 300 millisecond delay on focusable elements—possibly in combination with the meta viewport declaration—make sense?

Progresponsive

Brad has done a great job in documenting navigation patterns for responsive designs. More recently I came across Erick Arbé’s similar collection of patterns for responsive navigation. And, of course, at the Responsive Day Out, David gave a presentation on the subject.

David Bushell: Responsive Navigation on Huffduffer

As I mentioned in the chat after David’s talk, choosing a pattern doesn’t need to be an either/or decision. You can start with a simple solution and progressively enhance to a more complex navigation pattern.

Take the footer-anchor pattern, for example. I really, really like this pattern. It doesn’t require any JavaScript whatsoever; just a simple hyperlink from the top of the page that links to the fragment identifier of the navigation at the bottom of the page. It works on just about every device.

But you don’t have to stop there. Now that you’ve got a simple solution that works everywhere, you can enhance it for more capable browsers.

Take a look at this example that applies the off-canvas pattern for browsers capable of handling the JavaScript and CSS required.

You can see the two patterns in action by looking at the source in JS Bin. If you toggle the “Auto-run JS” checkbox, you can see both behaviours. Without JavaScript you get the footer-anchor pattern. With JavaScript (and a capable browser) you get the off-canvas pattern.

I haven’t applied any media queries in this instance, but it would be pretty straightforward to apply absolute positioning or the display: table hack to display the navigation by default at wider screen sizes. I’ll leave that as an exercise for the reader (bonus points: apply the off-canvas from the right of the viewport rather than the left).

Feel free to peruse the somewhat simplistic code. I’m doing a bit of feature detection—or cutting the mustard—to test for querySelector and addEventListener. If a browser passes the test, a class is applied to the document root and some JavaScript is executed on page load to toggle the off-canvas behaviour.

On a recent project, I found myself implementing a number of different navigation patterns: off-canvas, overlay, and progressive disclosure. But each one began as an instance of the simple footer-anchor pattern.

Progressive enhancement, baby. Still not dead, still important.

Off-canvas horizontal lists

There was a repeated rallying cry at the Responsive Day Out. It was the call for more sharing—more sharing of data, more sharing of case studies, more sharing of success stories, but also more sharing of failures.

In that spirit, I thought I’d share a pattern I’ve been working on. It didn’t work, but I’m not going to let that stop me putting it out there.

Here’s what I wanted to do…

Let’s say you’ve got a list of items; modular chunks of markup like an image and a caption, for example. By default these will display linearly on a small screen: a vertical list. I quite like the way that the Flickr iPhone app takes those lists and makes them horizontal—they go off-canvas (to the right), with a little bit of the next item peaking out to give some affordance. It’s like an off-canvas carousel.

I’d quite like to use that interaction in responsive designs. But I don’t want to do it by throwing a lot of JavaScript at the problem. So I thought I’d attempt to achieve it with a little bit of CSS.

So, let’s say I’ve got a list of six items like this:

<div class="items">
    <ul class="item-list">
        <li class="item"></li>
        <li class="item"></li>
        <li class="item"></li>
        <li class="item"></li>
        <li class="item"></li>
        <li class="item"></li>
    </ul><!-- /.item-list -->
</div><!-- /.items -->

Please pay no mind to the qualities of the class names: this is just a quick proof of concept.

Here’s how that looks. At larger screen sizes, I display the list items in groups of two or three, side by side. At smaller sizes, the items simply linearise vertically.

Okay, now within a small-screen media query I’m going to constrain the width of the container:

.items {
    width: 100%;
}

I’m going to make the list within that element stretch off-canvas for six screens wide (this depends on me knowing that there will be exactly six items in the list):

.items .item-list {
    width: 600%;
}

Now I’ll make each item one sixth of that size, which should be one screen’s worth. Actually, I’m going to make it a bit less than exactly one sixth (which would be 16.6666%) so that a bit of the next item peaks out:

.item-list .item {
    width: 15%;
}

My hope was that to make this crawlable/swipable, all I had to do was apply overflow: scroll to the containing element:

.items {
    width: 100%;
    overflow: scroll;
}

All of that is wrapped up in a small-viewport media query:

@media all and (max-width: 30em) {
    .items {
        width: 100%;
        overflow: scroll;
    }
    .items .item-list {
        width: 600%;
    }
    .items .item {
        width: 15%;
    }
}

It actually works …in some browsers. Alas, support for overflow: scroll doesn’t extend back as far as Android 2, still a very popular flavour of that operating system. That’s quite a showstopper.

There is a polyfill called Overthrow from those mad geniuses at Filament Group. But, as I said, I’d rather not throw more code at the problem. While I can imagine shovelling a polyfill at a desktop browser, I have a lot of qualms about trying to “support” an older mobile browser by giving it a chunk of JavaScript to chew on.

What I really need is a way to detect support for overflow: scroll. Alas, looking at the code for Overthrow, that isn’t so easy. Modernizr cannot help me here. We are in the realm of the undetectables.

My pattern is, alas, a failure.

Or, at least, it’s a failure for now. The @supports rule in CSS is tailor-made for this kind of situation. Basically, I don’t want any those small-screen rules to apply unless the browser supports overflow: scroll. Here’s how I will be able to do that:

@media all and (max-width: 30em) {
  @supports (overflow: scroll) {
    .items {
        width: 100%;
        overflow: scroll;
    }
    .items .item-list {
        width: 600%;
    }
    .items .item {
        width: 15%;
    }
  }
}

This is really, really useful. It means that I can start implementing this pattern now even though very few browsers currently understand @supports. That’s okay. Browsers that don’t understand it will simply ignore the whole block of CSS, leaving the list items to display vertically. But as @support gets more …um, support …then the pattern will kick in for those more capable browsers.

I can see myself adding this pre-emptive pattern for a few different use cases:

Feel free to poke at the example code. Perhaps you can find a way to succeed where I have failed.

Publishing Paranormal Interactivity

I’ve published the transcript of a talk I gave at An Event Apart in 2010. It’s mostly about interaction design, with a couple of diversions into progressive enhancement and personality in products. It’s called Paranormal Interactivity.

I had a lot of fun with this talk. It’s interspersed with videos from The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, Alan Partridge, and Super Mario, with special guest appearances from the existentialist chalkboard and Poshy’s upper back torso.

If you don’t feel like reading it, you can always watch the video or listen to the audio.

Adactio: Articles—Paranormal Interactivity on Huffduffer

You could even look at the slides but, as I always say, they won’t make much sense without the context of the presentation.

Continuous partial annoyance

Twitter have been rolling out a new redesign. Thanks to Dustin, I got to try it out when the switch was flipped.

As with any redesign, the initial reaction tends to be It’s different! I fear change! Therefore I dislike this. See also: redesigns of The Guardian, Last.fm, Flickr, BBC…

With Twitter, that initial knee-jerk fades pretty quickly because the new site is undeniably beautiful. The visual design is top-notch.

There’s a nice little addition in the markup, too. The body element has a class name that you can hook into for user stylesheets. This is a very, very, very good thing. For example, my class name is .user-style-adactio so I can add some declarations to my user stylesheet.

The first rule simply hides the egregious Trending Topics and Who To Follow features (and I love that Who To Follow abbreviates to WTF):

.user-style-adactio .trends-inner,
.user-style-adactio .wtf-inner {
 display: none !important;
}

By the way, a user stylesheet is the only time it’s acceptable use important! in your CSS.

My other rules adjust the layout a bit when the viewport gets smaller. It’s just a quick little hack and it’s not great but it’s handy if, like me and Norm!, you don’t like a site dictating how wide your browser window should be. Thanks to user stylesheets, you can fix this:

@media screen and (max-width: 995px) {
 .user-style-adactio #page-container,
 .user-style-adactio #page-outer {
  min-width: 590px !important;
 }
 .user-style-adactio .dashboard {
  float: none !important;
  clear: both !important;
  max-width: 0 !important;
 }
}

Handy tip: if you use Dropbox, store your user stylesheet there. That way, you can point multiple machines to the same stylesheet. I’ve got my laptop at home and my iMac at work pointing to the same CSS file.

There’s one aspect of the new Twitter redesign that I really don’t like, and I can’t fix it with a user stylesheet: infinite scrolling. As I said (on Twitter, of course):

I’m allergic to infinite scrolling

Notice that I didn’t say that infinite scrolling is wrong, it’s just wrong for me. There’s nothing wrong with peanuts unless you have a nut allergy.

The reason that I don’t like infinite scrolling is that I actually use the scrollbar to scroll. That is, I move my cursor over the scrollbar, click and drag. Infinite scrolling makes this unworkable: the scrollbar under my cursor jumps around as new content is loaded.

I figured that in this day of mouse wheels and trackpads, I must be in the minority with my old-fashioned scrollbar usage. I asked for data on Twitter, and sure enough, most people who responded said they used the mouse wheel, the trackpad, the space bar or arrow keys. Though some people still found the scrollbar useful as a visual indicator of how long the page is …which is also negated by infinite scrolling.

Interestingly, while most of the people who responded to my query on Twitter said they hardly ever use the scrollbar, the Firefox heatmap shows that it’s one of the most used interface features. That was a much larger sampling: 117,000 users.

Still, I can understand why Twitter have decided to go with infinite scrolling. If I’m in the minority in thinking it’s horrible, that’s my problem. I can’t even claim that it’s an accessibility problem: it requires more manual dexterity to use the scrollbar than to use other methods of scrolling.

Twitter could add a user setting to switch off infinite scrolling—perhaps replacing it with the old style “more” button, which I liked—but that’s a cop-out. Whenever something gets shunted off into a preference, it’s generally a sign of indecision in the design. The Twitter redesign isn’t indecisive: it has a very clear and consistent visual and interactive design vocabulary. It just happens that one aspect of the UI vocabulary doesn’t mesh well with my own usage pattern.

So, in this case, the solution may well be for me to change the way I use the site. It still irks me, though. I’m generally against any interactions that happen without an explicit request from the user, such as revealing data and functionality on hover, for example. Twitter avoids that particular anti-pattern but with infinite scrolling, the act of moving down the page is interpreted as a request to load more data. I would much prefer to request that data explicitly with a button or link. Of course, that requires that the user do more, so it could be argued that infinite scrolling actually reduces the number of interactions that the user is required to do …assuming that the inferred interaction is in fact the desired interaction. That’s a big assumption.

On the face of it, it would seem that Twitter are being somewhat dismissive of the scrollbar as a UI element. But that’s not true. While they are reducing the usefulness of browser-native scrollbars by using infinite scrolling, they are, at the same time, replicating the functionality of scrollbars but non-natively. If you reveal a side panel—by clicking on someone’s Twitter username, for example—and if the content doesn’t fit within the viewport, then a non-native scrollbar is generated.

scrollbars

As I said, the new redesign is wonderful. I’m just nit-picking ..but it’s a big nit.

The Framework Age

Liz Danzico is talking at An Event Apart San Francisco about frameworks. Not CSS frameworks, not JavaScript frameworks, not Rails, not Django, but websites as frameworks. These days we’re designing frameworks for user interaction rather than static artefacts.

Liz tells a story about Miles Davis who showed up at the studio with six slips of paper listing the six musicians he wanted to play with on his record. Over the course of one day, these people who had never played this music together recorded a whole album. Davis wanted to capture something called creative instability. Kind of Blue came out of this framework that he created.

Liz wants to talk about frameworks that are uninscribed and detectable cues that loosely govern a set of actions. These are interaction frameworks, frameworks that shape how people behave.

Back to music. Classical music uses classical notation. If you can’t read notation, you can’t make sense of it so it’s kind of elitist. It also provides rules like tempo and key. If you step outside these boundaries, you are deviating from the notation. Also, every note is accounted for in the notation. You can’t improvise it. Jazz notation is different. It provides chord progressions. It’s up to the musician to improvise around this framework. Modal jazz is even more abstract. That’s what Miles Davis invented that day in the studio. Kind of Blue was created out of just a scale.

On the web, we’re making the same transition from classical to jazz. We’re improvising. We’ve moved from a hard-coded system of building pages to an open system of creating participatory environments.

But this kind of tension is nothing new. It’s being going on for years. There’s been a long-running tension between orality and literacy. The printing press destroyed a lot of oral tradition but we still use word of mouth to pass on urban legends and recipes. Liz mentions Alex Wright’s observation in Glut that we are seeing a resurgence in this kind of oral tradition online. Even though we’re writing in blogs and mailing lists, we’re not so much publishing as talking.

There’s evidence of improv online. Exquisite simplicity was how pianist Bill Evans described Miles Davis’s framework of six slips of paper.

Quoting from The Paradox of Choice, Liz shows how the default settings can make a big difference (in the number of organ donations, for example, which could be opt-in or opt-out). Geni has some smart default settings. Same with Tripit. All you need to do is forward an email and it will take care of the rest. Focus on creating smart defaults.

In improv, you need to involve the audience. It’s important to adapt to what your audience is doing. Here’s an example from architecture: there was a fountain that was built in Washington Square Park in New York but before they got ‘round to turning it on, people started using it as a seating area. When the city tried to turn on the fountain, people revolted. The fountain is dry to this day and is used for public theatre.

Referring to the redesign of the Wordpress admin, Liz points out that it’s really important to involve users in the design process. There’s a difference between asking your audience what they think of a system compared to looking at how they are actually using that system.

Listen and watch. That’s another lesson we can take from music and apply to the web. When you’re playing with other people, not only do you have to listen to what the other people are doing, you have to watch them too. It’s the same with architecture. Desire paths are created by people actually using a space. They show clearly where paths should be built. Eyetracking can reveal the desire paths of users interacting with an application. There are other tools like User Voice which can involve the audience. Observe. Listen. Pay attention.

A common technique in Jazz is call and response when musicians play off one another. You see this online in reviews where the reviews start reacting to each other rather than the original item being reviewed. Allow users to build on one another.

User-centred design and participatory design are great ways of involving the users in the design process but that’s still different to actual use. It’s time for a new way of working: designing for improvisation (but remember that no one single process will ever be successful). Our design process should reflect the trend towards user participation that we’re seeing on the web. People’s tolerance for improvisation is increasing and our role as framework providers should reflect that.

Spaces

It seems that small interface changes are rolled out to Twitter on a fairly regular basis. This morning, for example, I was greeted with a new “Everyone” tab. I was also disappointed to discover that an interface improvement that was introduced a few weeks ago has now been removed. As interaction tweaks go, this was a very small thing but it’s something I appreciated very much. Let me explain…

When I’m reading a long-ish page on the Web, rather than move my cursor over to the scrollbar, position it just so and click to scroll down see the next screenful of content, I’ll just tap the spacebar. In just about every browser I know, this will scroll the content by one screenful. This flow is interrupted if a website “helpfully” puts the focus into a form element when the page loads. This isn’t an issue on, say, Google because Google doesn’t have more than one screenful of content. But it is an issue on Twitter. When Twitter loads, the What are you doing? input box is automatically given focus. If I want to scroll down below the fold, I must either use the scrollbar or click out of the form element and then use the spacebar. I can understand the rationale behind this. Chances are most people want to get into that form element and start typing …at least on the front page.

The interface improvement that Twitter introduced a while back was to take that automatic focus away if I was on any page other than the first. In other words, if I was clicking back through older pages to catch up what my friends have been doing, the focus was no longer automatically given to the form element. Brilliant! This awareness of context reminds me of what Eric wrote when they were adding print stylesheets to A List Apart:

These print styles are only used on articles, which are the pages that are most likely to be printed.

Perhaps through oversight or maybe through deliberate choice, Twitter now places the focus in that form element on every page. What a pain! And what a shame that a great example of context-sensitive interaction has been removed.

I hereby invoke my bitching ‘n’ moaning mojo: c’mon Twitter, do the right thing.

While I’m at it…

Oi! Flickr! What’s up with the automatic focus in the search form on search results pages? Explain that to me. ‘Cause from where I’m sitting, it’s just downright annoying.

Outgoing

As a web developer, I get annoyed by interaction design implementations all the time: Why is that a link instead of a form button?, Why doesn’t that scale when I bump up the font size?, Why am I being asked to enter this unnecessary information?… Usually I can brush off these annoyances and continue my journey along the threads of the World Wide Web but there’s one “feature” that has irked me to point of distraction and it’s all the more irritating for being on a site I use habitually: Upcoming.

As an Upcoming user, I have a default location. In my case it’s Brighton. This location is important. My location determines what content gets served up to me on the front page of the site—a useful way of discovering local events of interest.

The site also has a search feature. The search form has two components: what I’m searching for and where I’m searching for it. The “where” field defaults to my location, which is a handy little touch. If I want to search for something outside my current location—say the Future of Web Design conference in London this April—I can enter “Future of Web Design” in the “what” field and delete “Brighton” from the “where” field, replacing it with “London”. That works: I have now narrowed down my search to the location “London.”

Here’s the problem: if I now return to the front page I will find that my location is London. That’s right: simply by searching in a place, the system assumes that I now want that to be my location. You know what they say about assumptions, right? In this case, not only has it made an ass out of me, it has, over time, instilled a fear of searching.

I’ll be in San Francisco at the end of this month so I’d like to see what’s going on while I’m there. But once I’ve finished my searching I must remember to reset my location back to Brighton. Knowing this makes me hesitant to use the search form. No doubt the justification for this unexpected behaviour in the search is to second-guess what people really want: do as I want, not as I say. But when I search, I really just want to search. I suspect the same is true of most people.

Normally I wouldn’t rant about an obviously-flawed feature but in this case it’s a feature that can be easily fixed by simply being removed. Here is the current flow:

  1. The user enters a search term in the “what” field, a location in the “where” field and submits the search form.
  2. The system returns a list of search results for the specified term in the specified place.
  3. The system changes the user’s location to the specified place.

That third step is completely unnecessary. Its omission would not harm the search functionality one whit and it would make the search interface more truthful and less duplicitous.

I’ve already mentioned this on the Upcoming suggestion board. If you can think of a good reason why the current behaviour should stay, please add your justification there. If, like me, you’d like to see a search feature that actually just searches, please let your voice be heard there too.

Please Leonard, Neil, I kvetch because I care. I use Upcoming all the time. It would be a butt-kicking service if it weren’t for this one glaring flaw… even without a liquid layout.

Update: Fixed!

The tyranny of mouseover

If I click on a link, I am initiating an action. If I fill in a form and press a submit button, I am initiating an action. But if I move my mouse over a page element, I am not initiating an action. Chances are I’m on my way to initiating an action (like clicking a link or pressing a button) but if I brush past a link on the way, that does not mean that I want something to happen in response.

Most browsers display the value of a title attribute as a tool-tip after a suitable pause. Generally this works pretty well as long as the tool-tip is relatively small and self-contained. Ever come across an instance of a title attribute with a large amount of text? It just feels wrong. There are economies of scale when it comes to displaying information triggered by a mouseover.

All of this is by way of introduction to the topic of those bloody annoying Snap previews that are quite literally popping up all over the place.

I’m not alone in my annoyance. Lorelle VanFossen has put together an excellent list of the problems caused by these rude and intrusive interlopers. As well as listing the accessibility issues for low-vision and motor-impaired users, she makes the very valid point that these pop-ups actively destroy the act of reading:

There’s a small author-part of me that hopes what I write resembles some action-packed-page-turning-thriller and that people are glued to their screens eagerly embracing every word I write. I’d hate to have that experience be interrupted by an annoying pop-up window of any kind. Destroys the interaction of the reader with the written word, doesn’t it?

The way that the developers at Snap view web pages reminds of the Far Side cartoon:

Blah blah LINK blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah LINK blah blah blah blah blah…

Lorelle’s frustration is particularly acute because the Snap previews showed up on her Wordpress.com blog because Matt thought it would be cool to roll out this “feature” to 10% of Wordpress.com users.

Luckily, Lorelle and other hijacked blogs can turn the feature off. As pointed out by John Gruber, Jason Kottke and Michael Heilemann, the rest of us can also deactivate these annoying things. I should also point out that you can deactivate them directly from a preview by clicking on the “options” link in the pop-up and setting either a local or a global cookie to switch off the previews.

But this is like opt-out spam. I shouldn’t be confronted by these intrusive and annoying pop-ups to begin with. Offering them as a feature to users who want them strikes me as a perfectly reasonable implementation. This is the perfect example of something that should have been implemented like a Greasemonkey script: give users the choice and the power to activate this flashy feature. But don’t foist it on us and then claim it’s our responsibility to disable it.

If you haven’t seen the Snap previews in action, you can find them on TechCrunch and Vitamin, to give just two examples. Their presence on TechCrunch isn’t really surprising given that the site is devoted to pointing out all that is flashy and pointless on the web. But the gang over at Vitamin really ought to know better.