Tags: oauth

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Pattern praise

Two months ago, I called Twitter out on their insistence that developers use OAuth when authorising with Twitter while they themselves continued to use the password anti-pattern when they wanted to peek into third-party address books.

I’m happy to report that Twitter have since fixed this. If you go to the Find Friends portion of the “Who To Follow” section, you’ll now be greeted with links that lead to correct authentication with LinkedIn, Gmail, Yahoo and Hotmail.

Thanks, Twitteroonies!

Meanwhile, Flickr recently launched their own “Who to Follow” functionality. There is nary a password request in sight: they’ve implemented correct authentication right out of the gate for Yahoo, Gmail, Hotmail and Facebook.

Thanks, Flickroonies!

See? I’m not always bitching’n’moaning.

OAuthypocrisy and the Passwordpocalypse

The OAuthcalypse is upon us. Since August 31st, all third-party Twitter services must use OAuth to authenticate. This is a good thing; a very good thing. Before that date, services were allowed to use the password anti-pattern to log you in.

Twitter has put its foot down and declared that the password anti-pattern will no longer be tolerated. Hurrah!

What a shame then, that Twitter is being utterly hypocritical. On their Find Friends page, they encourage you to:

Scan your email address book or contacts to discover which of your friends are already using Twitter.

They do this using the password anti-pattern. You are asked for your Gmail password even though the Google Contacts API would allow Twitter to connect to Gmail using proper authentication …exactly what Twitter is insisting third-parties use when they want to access Twitter’s data.

Twitter asks for your Yahoo Mail password even though the Yahoo Contacts API would allow them access to your address book using OAuth.

Twitter asks for AOL passwords (now there’s an audience that we shouldn’t be teaching to give their passwords away) but even AOL has an API with proper authentication.

Twitter does connect to LinkedIn correctly. That’s one out of four.

There are two solutions to this state of affairs. Either Twitter decides to do the right thing and switch over to using APIs and authentication for Gmail, Yahoo and AOL …or else Gmail, Yahoo and AOL follow Twitter’s example and disallow the password anti-pattern for scraping address books.

Twitter should not be encouraging Gmail users, Yahoo users and AOL users to divulge their passwords but at the same time, Gmail, Yahoo and AOL should be taking steps to ensure that such profligate behaviour is not rewarded.

Twitter has done the right thing with third-party services wishing to access its data. Now let’s see if the third-party services currently being abused by Twitter will follow this example.

Update: There are some very encouraging responses from Twitter. Ryan Sarver says:

all good points and I think there are already plans to fix it

And Josh Elman concurs:

yes - great points and something we hope to migrate very soon

Antipatterns for sale

Twply is a straightforward little Twitter app that sends @replies to email. It uses the password anti-pattern. Oh, but don’t worry. It states quite clearly on the site that Your password is safe with us. No worries!

Twply is up for sale …sold. That means all those passwords are available to the highest bidder ($1200 in this case).

Sleep tight, Twply users. May you wake to a better day.