Tags: responsiveconf



Far afield

I spoke at Responsive Field Day here in Portland on Friday. It was an excellent event. All the talks were top notch.

The day flew by, with each talk clocking in at just 20 minutes, in batches of three followed by a quick panel discussion. It was a great format …but I knew it would be. See, Responsive Field Day was basically Responsive Day Out relocated to Portland.

Jason told me last year how inspired he was by the podcast recordings from Responsive Day Out and how much he and Lyza wanted to do a Responsive Day Out in Portland. I said “Go for it!” although I advised changing to the name to something a bit more American (having a “day out” at the seaside feels very British—a “field day” works perfectly as the US equivalent). Well, Jason, Lyza, and everyone at Cloud Four should feel very proud of their Responsive Field Day—it was wonderful.

As the day unfolded on Friday, I found myself being quite moved. It was genuinely touching to see my conference template replicated not only in format, but also in spirit. It was affordable (“Every expense spared!” was my motto), inclusive, diverse, and fast-paced. It was a lovely, lovely feeling to think that I had, in some small way, provided some inspiration for such a great event.

Jessica pointed out that isn’t the first time I’ve set up an event template for others to follow. When I organised the first Science Hack Day in London a few years ago, I never could have predicted how amazingly far Ariel would take the event. Fifty Science Hack Days in multiple countries—fifty! I am in awe of Ariel’s dedication. And every time I see pictures or video from a Science Hack Day in some far-flung location I’ve never been to, and I see the logo festooning the venue …I get such a warm fuzzy glow.

Y’know, when you’re making something—whether it’s an event, a website, a book, or anything else—it’s hard to imagine what kind of lifespan it might have. It’s probably just as well. I think it would be paralysing and overwhelming to even contemplate in advance. But in retrospect …it sure feels nice.

Video video

Hey, remember Responsive Day Out 3: The Final Breakpoint? Remember all those great talks?


Perhaps your memory needs refreshing.

Luckily for you, all the talks were recorded. The audio has been available for a while. Now the videos are also available for your viewing pleasure.

  1. Alice Bartlett
  2. Rachel Shillcock
  3. Alla Kholmatova
  4. Peter Gasston
  5. Jason Grigsby
  6. Heydon Pickering
  7. Jake Archibald
  8. Ruth John
  9. Zoe Mickley Gillenwater
  10. Rosie Campbell
  11. Lyza Gardner
  12. Aaron Gustafson

Thanks to Craig and Amie from Five Simple Steps for coming to Brighton to record the videos—really appreciate it. And thanks to Shopify for sponsoring the videos; covering the cost of the videos meant that we could keep the ticket price low.

What a day out! What a lovely responsive day out!

What a day out! What a lovely responsive day out!

The third and final Responsive Day Out is done and dusted. In short, it was fantastic. Every single talk was superb. Statistically that seems highly unlikely, but it’s true.

I was quite overcome by the outpouring of warmth and all the positive feedback I got from the attendees. That made me feel really good, if a little guilty. Guilty because the truth is that I don’t really consider the attendees when I’m putting the line-up together. Instead I take much greedier approach: I ask “who do I want to hear speak?” Still, it’s nice to know that there’s so much overlap in our collective opinion.

Despite the overwhelmingly positive reaction to the day, I had a couple of complaints myself, and they’re both related to the venue. My issues were with:

  1. the seats and
  2. the temperature.

The tiered seating in the Corn Exchange is great for giving everyone in the audience a good view, but the seats are awfully close together. That leaves taller people with some sore knees.

And the problem with having a conference in the middle of June is that, if the weather is good—which I’m glad it was—the Corn Exchange can get awfully hot and sweaty in the latter half of the day.

Both those issues would be solved by using a more salubrious venue, like the main Brighton Dome itself, but then that would also mean a doubling of the cost per ticket (hence why dConstruct and Responsive Day Out are in different price ranges). And one of the big attractions of Responsive Day Out is its ludicrously cheap ticket price. That meant sacrificing a lot of comforts—I just wish that comfortable seats and air temperature weren’t amongst them.

Still. Listen to me moaning about the things I didn’t like when in fact the day was really, really wonderful.

Orde liveblogged every single talk and Hidde wrote an in-depth overview of the whole day. If you were there, I would love it if you would share your thoughts, preferably on your own website.

Guess what? The audio from all the talks is already online. As always, Drew did an amazing job. You can subscribe to the RSS feed in your podcatching software of choice. Videos will be available after a while, but for now you’ll have to make do with the audio.

Oh, and speaking of audio, if you liked the music that was playing in the breaks, here’s the playlist. My thanks to all the artists for licensing their work under a Creative Commons license so that I could dodge one more expense that would otherwise have to be passed on to the ticket price.

Now. The number one question that people were asking me at the pub afterwards was “why is this the last one?” I really should’ve addressed that during my closing remarks.

But here’s the thing: the first Responsive Day Out was intended as a one-off. So really the question should be: why were there three? To which I have no good answer other than to say it felt about right. With three of them, it gave just about everyone a chance to get to at least one. If you didn’t make it to any of the responsive days out, well …you’ve only got yourself to blame.

If we ended up having Responsive Day Out 7 or 8, then something would have gone horribly wrong with the world of web design and development. The truth is that responsive web design is just plain ol’ web design: it’s the new normal. I guess the term “responsive” makes for a nice hook to hang a day’s talks off, but the truth is that, even by the third event, the specific connections to responsive design were getting more tenuous. There was plenty about accessibility, progressive enhancement, and the latest CSS and JavaScript APIs: all those things are enormously valuable when it comes to responsive web design …because all of those things are enormously valuable when it comes to just plain ol’ web web design.

In the end, I’m glad that I ended up doing three events. Now I can see the arc of all the events as one. Listening back to all the talks from all three years you can hear the trajectory from “ARGH! This responsive design stuff is really scary! How will we cope‽” to “Hey, this responsive design stuff is the way we do things now.” There are still many, many challenges of course, but the question is no longer if responsive design is the way to go. Instead we can talk about how we can help one other do it well.

At the end of the third and final Responsive Day Out, I thanked all the speakers from all three events. It’s quite a roll-call. And it was immensely gratifying to see so many of the names from previous years in the audience at the final event.

I am sincerely grateful to:

  • Sarah Parmenter,
  • David Bushell,
  • Tom Maslen,
  • Richard Rutter,
  • Josh Emerson,
  • Laura Kalbag,
  • Elliot Jay Stocks,
  • Anna Debenham,
  • Andy Hume,
  • Bruce Lawson,
  • Owen Gregory,
  • Paul Lloyd,
  • Mark Boulton,
  • Stephen Hay,
  • Sally Jenkinson,
  • Ida Aalen,
  • Rachel Andrew,
  • Dan Donald,
  • Inayaili de León Persson,
  • Oliver Reichenstein,
  • Kirsty Burgoine,
  • Stephanie Rieger,
  • Ethan Marcotte,
  • Alice Bartlett,
  • Rachel Shillcock,
  • Alla Kholmatova,
  • Peter Gasston,
  • Jason Grigsby,
  • Heydon Pickering,
  • Jake Archibald,
  • Ruth John,
  • Zoe Mickley Gillenwater,
  • Rosie Campbell,
  • Lyza Gardner, and
  • Aaron Gustafson.

Many thanks also to everyone who came along to the events, especially the hat-trickers who made it to all three.

I’ve organised a total of six conferences now and I’m extremely proud of all of them:

  1. dConstruct 2012: Playing With The Future,
  2. the first Responsive Day Out,
  3. dConstruct 2013: Communicating With Machines,
  4. Responsive Day Out 2: The Squishening,
  5. dConstruct 2014: Living With The Network, and
  6. Responsive Day Out 3: The Final Breakpoint.

…but they’ve also been a lot of work. dConstruct in particular took a lot out of me last year. That’s why I’m not involved with this year’s event—Andy has taken the reins instead. By comparison, Responsive Day Out is a much more low-key affair; not nearly as stressful to put together. Still, three in a row is plenty. It’s time to end it on a hell of a high note.

That’s not to say I won’t be organising some other event sometime in the future. Maybe I’ll even revive the format of Responsive Day Out—three back-to-back 20 minute talks makes for an unbeatable firehose of knowledge. But for now, I’m going to take a little break from event-organising.

Besides, it’s not as though Responsive Day Out is really gone. Its spirit lives on in its US equivalent, Responsive Field Day in Portland in September.

100 words 089

Today was quite special. The third and final Responsive Day Out was a splendid event. Every single speaker was superb. I know that sounds like a statistical unlikelihood considering there were twelve of them, but it’s true.

The day flew past. It was over before I knew it. Then it was time to stand out in the summer sun, have some pints, and chat about responsive design, accessibility, progressive enhancement, CSS, and all the other topics that were raised during the day.

During the post-conference wind-down, I was presented with two different cards, signed by attendees, thanking me. I’m verklempt.

100 words 088

Tomorrow is the big day—Responsive Day Out 3: The Final Breakpoint.

All the speakers are in town, safely ensconced in their hotel. To welcome them to Brighton and to get them relaxed for tomorrow, we all went out for a magnificent meal this evening. I hired out the pop-up restaurant Isaac At. What better way to welcome people to Sussex than to sample local seasonal food (and drinks) prepared by an immensely talented team. It was really great—great food, great company; just right.

Now I will attempt to get a night’s sleep before tomorrow’s overload of responsive brilliance.

100 words 085

I’m back in Brighton after a thoroughly lovely weekend in Ireland. I must remember to visit Cobh more often in the summertime when there’s quite a lot of fun things to do.

But it’s nice to be back in Brighton too. This is the time of year when a seaside town really comes alive. And this is a particularly good week to be in Brighton—in just a few more days it’ll be time for third and final Responsive Day Out. I know it’s going to be an excellent event, packed with great talks. I’m really looking forward to it.

Responsive Day Out 3: The Final Schedule

There’s just a few more weeks to go until the third and final Responsive Day Out and I can’t wait! It’s going to be unmissable so, like, don’t miss it. If you haven’t already got your ticket, it’s not too late. And remember: it’s a measly £80.

On June 19th, follow the trail of eager geeks to the Corn Exchange at the Brighton Dome, a short walk from the train station. We’ll be using the main Dome entrance on Church Street and registration starts at 9am, with the first talk at 10am.

I’ve already talked about the topics that will be covered on the day. Here’s what I’m planning for the day’s schedule (subject to change):

09:00 - 10:00Registration
10:00 - 10:20Alice
10:20 - 10:40Rachel
10:40 - 11:00Alla
11:00 - 11:15Chat with Alice, Rachel, and Alla
11:15 - 11:45Break
11:45 - 12:05Zoe
12:05 - 12:25Jason
12:25 - 12:45Heydon
12:45 - 13:00Chat with Zoe, Jason, and Heydon
13:00 - 14:30Lunch
14:30 - 14:50Jake
14:50 - 15:10Ruth
15:10 - 15:30Peter
15:30 - 15:45Chat with Jake, Ruth, and Peter
15:45 - 16:15Break
16:15 - 16:35Rosie
16:35 - 16:55Lyza
16:55 - 17:15Aaron
17:15 - 17:30Chat with Rosie, Lyza, and Aaron
17:30 - ??:??Pub!

Now, what with it being a measly £80, don’t expect much in the way of swag. In fact, don’t expect anything in the way of swag. You won’t even get a lanyard; just a sticker. There won’t be any after-party; we can all just wander off to the nearby pubs and cafés instead. And lunch won’t be provided. But that’s okay, because Street Diner will be happening just up the road that day, and I’ve already confirmed that The Troll’s Pantry will be present—best burgers in Brighton (or anywhere else for that matter).

It’s going to be such a great day! Like I said …unmissable.

The shape of Responsive Day Out 3: The Final Breakpoint

It’s less than two months now until Responsive Day Out 3: The Final Breakpoint. Fortunately there are still some tickets available so if you haven’t got yours yet, it’s not too late. Remember: it’s cheap as chips—just £80+VAT for a day jam-packed with knowledge bombs from twelve(!) fantastic speakers. You’d be crazy to miss it.

If you’ve already got your ticket, you might be wondering what awaits you. Well, if you’ve been to either of the previous days out, you’ll know what to expect: a medley of topics covering all areas of responsive design, from process and workflow through to visual design and code.

The day will be broken up into four segments. Each segment will feature three thematically-related 20 minute talks, back to back. Then those three speakers will join me for a joint chat, where we can take questions from the audience. Check out the videos from the first Responsive Day Out to get feel for the pace or have a listen to the podcast recordings from previous years.

Here’s my rough plan for the four segments this year…

  1. The day will start with some big picture thinking around workflows. There’ll be an emphasis on accessibility—something that can’t just be tagged on to the end of a project. There’s also be a case study of one of the hottest topics in the web designers’ workflow today; style guides and pattern libraries. And importantly, we want to make sure that the role of creativity isn’t forgotten in our new responsive world.
  2. The second segment will be like a mini conference on front-end technologies. There’ll be some deep diving into the latest in CSS techniques, including flexbox, as well as that thorny topic of responsive images. It’s hard to believe, but that’s a topic that hasn’t been covered in previous Responsive Days Out. Time to change that.
  3. After lunch, we’ll start to look beyond today and to the future of responsive design. That’ll begin with a segment on cutting-edge browser technologies. You can expect to be wowed with demos of the latest browser APIs and get your head around the much-hyped world of web components. We won’t shy away from asking how the web can compete with native experiences, like making our sites work offline.
  4. Finally, we’ll end the day—and indeed, the conference series—by taking a high level view of what the future might bring. There’ll be an examination of the skill sets that designers and developers should equip themselves with, and we’ll look beyond the screen to a future of new inputs and outputs.

So the day will have a bell-curved shape to it, starting out with a relatively high-level view, swooping down in the middle to get really stuck in with the technologies of today, before ascending at the end to look into the future.

Friday, June 19th—put that date in your diary. Registration is from 9-10am. There’ll be an hour and a half for lunch (and Street Diner will be on that day!) and everything will wrap up by 5:30pm. It’s going to be an action-packed day—bam! bam! bam!

If you don’t come along to the final Responsive Day Out, you’re going to regret it. So what are you waiting for?

Complete line-up for Responsive Day Out 3

The circle is now complete. The line-up for the third and final Responsive Day Out is all set.

I’ve been scheming behind the scenes to get one of my favourite speakers added to the roster, and now my dastardly scheme has paid off. I am absolutely thrilled to announce that Lyza Danger Gardner will be speaking at Responsive Day Out 3: The Final Breakpoint.

That means we’ve got a double-whammy from the trailblazers at Cloud Four with both Jason and Lyza speaking. With Jason diving deep into responsive images, that leaves Lyza free to zoom out and look at some of the big-picture implications of the work we do on the web.

To say that I’m excited to hear what she has to say would be an exercise in understatement. I am ridiculously excited about the whole day—seriously, in my emails to the speakers, I find myself using far more exclamation points than is healthy. Why, I might even have included an emoticon or two; that’s how psyched I am.

If you’ve already got your ticket for a Responsive Day Out, well done you. If you haven’t, what are you waiting for? Tickets are just £80+VAT—a bargain!

Get your ticket now and I’ll see in Brighton on June 19th for a most excellent day of design, development, UX, performance, process, and everything else responsive-related.

Responsive Day Out tickets tomorrow

Tickets for the third and final Responsive Day Out go on sale at 11am tomorrow, Tuesday, March 3rd. Here’s the direct link to the ticket page.

I recommend getting in there pretty sharpish. Tickets are less than a hundred quid, which is a steal considering the amazing line-up of speakers who will be bursting your brain with their knowledge of design, process, CSS, JavaScript, user experience, performance, accessibility, and everything else associated with responsive web design (which, let’s face it, is pretty much everything).

Oh, and that line-up just got even better. The one and only Jason Grigsby will be speaking! If you’ve seen Jason speak before, then you know how fantastic his talks are. If you haven’t seen Jason speak before, you’re in for a real treat. I’m guessing he’ll be dropping knowledge bombs on responsive images. He’s the Jedi master when it comes to that stuff. He’s got a real knack for taking a complex subject and making it understandable …something that could be said of all the other fantastic speakers too.

So set your calendar alarm now. Get your ticket tomorrow morning. And I’ll see you here in Brighton on Friday, June 19th for Responsive Day Out 3: The Final Breakpoint!

Tickets for the last Responsive Day Out

When he was writing up the Clearleft weeknotes for last week, Jon described my activity thusly:

Jeremy—besides working alongside myself and Charlotte this week—has been scheming on Responsive Day Out, and he seems quite pleased with himself. Pretty sure I heard a sinister ‘my plans are coming together almost too well’-type laugh today.

Well, my dastardly schemes are working out perfectly. I’m ridiculously pleased to announce that Rosie Campbell and Aaron Gustafson have been added to the line up for Responsive Day Out 3: The Final Breakpoint.

That means that as well as Rosie and Aaron, you’ll also hear from Zoe, Jake, Alice, Peter, Rachel, Ruth, Heydon, and Alla …and that’s not even the final line-up! There are still more speaker announcements to come, and if my scheming pays off, they’re going to be quite special.

I hope that you’ve already added June 19th (the date of the conference) to your calendar, but I’ve got another date for your diary: March 3rd. That’s when tickets will go on sale.

As with last year’s event—Responsive Day Out 2: The Squishening—tickets will be a measly £80 plus VAT (a total of £96). All those fantastic talks for less than a hundred squid.

So make sure you’re at the ready on 11am on Tuesday, the 3rd of March.

And then I’ll see you for a packed day of knowledge bomb dropping on Friday, the 19th of June.

Lining up Responsive Day Out 3

I’ve been scheming away for a little while now on the third and final Responsive Day Out, and things have been working out better than I could have hoped—my dream line-up is becoming a reality.

Two thirds of the line-up is assembled and ready to go:

See? It’s looking pretty darn good, if you ask me.

You can expect plenty of meaty front-end development topics around the latest in CSS and browser APIs, but also plenty of talk on process, accessibility, performance, and the design challenges of responsive design.

My plan is to go out with a bang for this last Responsive Day Out and, the way things are looking, that’s on the cards.

I’ll let you know when tickets will be available. It’ll probably be sometime in early March. They will, as with previous years, be ludicrously good value.

Oh, and to get you in the mood, this might be a good time to revisit the audio recordings from the first two years.

Events in 2015

Quite a significant chunk of my time last year was spent organising dConstruct 2014. The final result was worth it, but it really took it out of me. It got kind of stressful there for a while: ticket sales weren’t going as well as previous years, so I had to dip my toes into the world of… (shudder) marketing.

That was my third year organising dConstruct, and I’m immensely proud of all three events. dConstruct 2012—also known as “the one with James Burke”—remains a highlight of my life. But—especially after the particularly draining 2014 event—I’m going to pass on organising it this year.

To be honest, I think that dConstruct 2014, the tenth one, could stand as a perfectly fine final event. It’s not like it needs to run forever, right?

Andy has been pondering this very question, but he’s up for giving dConstruct at least one more go in 2015:

As we prepare for our tenth anniversary, we’ve also been asking whether it should be our last—at least for a while. The jury is still out, and we probably won’t make any decisions till after the event.

Y’know, it could turn out that dConstruct in 2015 might reinvigorate my energy, but for now, I’m just too burned out to contemplate taking it on myself. Anyway, I know that the other Clearlefties are more than capable of putting together a fantastic event.

But dConstruct wasn’t the only event I organised last year. 2014’s Responsive Day Out was a wonderful event, and much less stressful to organise. That’s mostly because it’s a very different beast to dConstruct; much looser, smaller, and easy-going, with fewer expectations. That makes for a fun day out all ‘round.

I wasn’t even sure if there was going to be a second Responsive Day Out, but I’m really glad we did it. In fact, I think there’s room for one last go.

I’ve already started putting a line-up together (and I’m squeeing with excitement about it already!), and this will definitely be the last Responsive Day Out, but keep your calendar clear on Friday, June 19th for…

Responsive Day Out 3: The Final Breakpoint.


Well, the second Responsive Day Out was a most excellent day out indeed. I figured it would be, what with that excellent line-up of speakers. Still, I was blown away by the quality of the talks—everyone over-delivered.

Stephen Sally Ida

Rachel Dan Inayaili

Oliver Kirsty Stephanie


Once again, lots of people remarked on how much they liked the format of three back-to-back short talks followed by a group discussion. And needless to say, Ethan’s closing keynote was the perfect rousing finish to the day.

Jeremy panel beepcheeks panel Panel Jeremy and Ethan

Despite it being a rough’n’ready affair, everything went pretty smoothly. The only annoyance was the way the room got a bit hot and stuffy towards the end of the day’s proceedings.

(It’s ironic. For the past few years we’ve had a conference in the Corn Exchange at the end of June—Ampersand—and the weather always turned out to be pretty drab, which we moaned about. This year we finally got some weather and it made the conference a bit uncomfortable. You can’t win.)

All in all though, it was a terrific day of inspiration and thought-provocation. If you came along, thank you. If you didn’t make it, you can catch up with post-conference reports from these people:

Marc took some great pictures and Drew did his usual terrific work recording all the audio:

Stephen, Sally, Ida, chatting with Stephen, Sally, and Ida, Rachel, Dan, Yaili, chatting with Rachel, Dan, and Yaili, Oliver, Kirsty, Stephanie, chatting with Oliver, Kirsty, and Stephanie, and the one and only Ethan.

Here’s the RSS feed to put into your podcatching software of choice.

In the pub afterwards, quite a few people asked me if there’d be a third Responsive Day Out. My initial feeling is “no” …but then again, I thought that after the first one too. So who knows? Maybe there’s room for one more (but then it really would be the last one). We’ll see.

But in the meantime, there’s one event that is most certainly happening that you definitely don’t want to miss: dConstruct 2014.

As I said at the closing of Responsive Day Out 2, dConstruct is a very different kind of event. There won’t be any delving into CSS specs. But it’s the perfect event for any web designer or web developer who wants to take a step back and look at the bigger picture. And it’s ruddy good fun.

So if you liked Responsive Day Out, you’re going to love dConstruct. Get your ticket now.

Responsive Day Out activities

The sequel I’ve been eagerly awaiting—Responsive Day Out 2—is almost here! It kicks off tomorrow morning at 9am. I probably won’t be able to sleep much tonight, but that’s okay: I’ll need to be at the Corn Exchange in the Brighton Dome bright and early to help get everything set up.

I always love the atmosphere on the day before an event in Brighton. I like seeing the updates from friends far and wide as they arrive into town. Everything is coalescing nicely: speakers, attendees, and all-round lovely people are begin to show up and gather together.

If you’re coming to the conference, you’re in for a treat. There’s going to be a lot of brain food provided. There will not, however, be any food food provided. But don’t fret. There’s a nice long hour-and-a-half lunch break, and plenty of options for food nearby.

I recommended heading up the street to the weekly Street Diner at the top of Church Road.

Once the conference is done, we’ll head to the pub. No particular pub, just …the pub. There are plenty within cat-swinging distance of the venue.

If you’re still in Brighton on Saturday, there are some sporty events planned.

And if you’re already in town, there’s a Business of Web Design event tonight at 68 Middle Street.

See you tomorrow!

Responsive Day Out 2: The Scheduling

Responsive Day Out 2 is just ten days away. If you’ve got a ticket, I’ll see you there. If you haven’t got a ticket, sorry; they’re all sold out. But despair not—some people who have tickets can’t make it and they’re looking to transfer theirs:

Matt Hill, Ali Springall, Marta Armada, and Matt Smith.

Either way, if you can make it to Brighton on Friday, June 27th, you’re in for a treat.

The location is the Corn Exchange at the Brighton Dome, a short walk from the train station. We’ll be using the main Dome entrance on Church Street. Just follow the geeks.

Bring along your ticket (either on paper or on a screen) or some form of ID. If you have a ticket and you can’t make it after all, feel free to transfer it to someone else: there’s a link in the email you got when you registered that will allow you to update the attendee details.

As with last year, the event will be a fast-paced affair, with each section chunked into groups of three back-to-back fast talks followed by a joint discussion with all three speakers.

I’ve grouped the talks into sections that are roughly thematically-related. The day will kick off with a section grouped around planning and process. Then there’ll be a more technology-focused section. After lunch, there’ll be a more big-picture, strategic section. At least one of the talks in each section will be based around a case study.

The one exception to the format is the final section of the day. That’s all Ethan, all the time. It will be Ethantastic.

The order might end up changing, but here’s what I’ve got planned:

Chat with Stephen, Sally, and Ida.
Chat with Rachel, Dan, and Yaili.
Chat with Oliver, Kirsty, and Stephanie.
Chat with Ethan.
– ??:??Pub

Now, just to make sure that your expectations are in check, remember that this is a very rough’n’ready spit’n’sawdust kind of event. You won’t be getting a conference programme. You won’t even be getting a lanyard. Lunch is not provided (but Street Diner will be on that day—yay!). There is no pre-party. There is no after-party. And if you want a cup of tea or a coffee, it’ll cost ya.

Basically, every expense has been spared for this. There’s only aspect where we haven’t cut any corners, and that’s with the speakers. I can guarantee you a day of excellent talks.

See you next Friday!

The more the merrier at Responsive Day Out 2

It’s just a little over four weeks until Responsive Day Out 2: Revenge Of The Width.

The final piece of the line-up has just dropped into place. Dan Donald will be joining us to talk about pushing the browser to achieve what the standards bodies are dragging their heels on. I’m very much looking forward to hearing what he has to share, just as I’m looking forward to hearing all the talks.

I’ve been liaising with each of the speakers to figure out the best way to craft a structured flow for the day. I’m positively giddy with anticipation now. Every one of the talks sounds like a valuable nugget of winningness.

I have some more Responsive Day Out news…

If you already have your ticket, great! I’ll see you on June 27th.

If you don’t already have your ticket, despair not! I’ve been working with the people at the venue to figure out a way of getting some more seats into the venue and I’m happy to report that we’ve been able to expand the capacity.

So grab your ticket now for the bargain price of just £80 plus VAT. They’re aren’t many extra tickets and they probably won’t last too long so get in there.

24 hours to go

Tickets for Responsive Day Out 2 go on sale at noon tomorrow. Like I said, it was extremely popular last year and sold out very quickly. I don’t know if that’s going to happen again this year, but if you’re thinking about grabbing a ticket, I wouldn’t dawdle too much if I were you.

There’s a new addition to the line-up: Yaili is going to talk about the ongoing responsive work going on at Ubuntu.com—I’m really looking forward to hearing about that.

Then again, I’m really looking forward to hearing from all the speakers. It’s going to be like Christmas is coming early; a responsive, jam-packed Christmas.

Here’s the ticket page if you want to get in there the moment tickets go on sale. It’s not live yet, but at the stroke of midday you can secure your place.

Return of the Responsive Day Out

When we decided to put on last year’s Responsive Day Out, it was a fairly haphazard, spur-of-the-moment affair. Well, when I say “spur of the moment”, I mean there was just three short months between announcing the event and actually doing it. In event-organising terms, that’s flying by the seat of your pants.

The Responsive Day Out was a huge success—just ask anyone who was there. Despite the lack of any of the usual conference comforts (we didn’t even have badges), everyone really enjoyed the whizz-bang, lickety-split format: four blocks of three back-to-back quickfire 20 minute talks, with each block wrapped up with a short discussion. And the talks were superb …really superb.

It was always intended as a one-off event. But I was surprised by how often people asked when the next one would be, either because they were there and loved it, or because they missed out on getting a ticket but heard how great it was. For a while, I was waving off those questions, saying that we had no plans for another Responsive Day Out. I figured that we had covered quite a lot in that one day, and now we should just be getting on with building the responsive web, right?

But then I started to notice how many companies were only beginning to make the switch to working responsively within the past year. It’s like the floodgates have opened. I’ve been going into companies and doing workshops where I’ve found myself thinking time and time again that these people could really benefit from an event like the Responsive Day Out.

Slowly but surely, the thought of having another Responsive Day Out grew and grew in my mind.

So let’s do this.

On Friday, June 27th, come on down to Brighton for Responsive Day Out 2: Elastic Bugaloo. It will be bloody brilliant.

The format will be mostly the same as last year, with one big change: one of the day’s slots won’t feature three quick back-to-back talks. Instead it will be a keynote presentation by none other than the Responitor himself, Duke Ethan of Marcotte.

There are some other differences from last year. Whereas last year’s speakers all came from within the borders of the UK, this year I’ve invited some supremely talented people from other parts of Europe. You can expect mind-expanding knowledge bombs on workflow, process, front-end technologies, and some case studies.

If you check out the website, you’ll see just some of the speakers I’ve got lined up for you: Stephanie, Rachel, Stephen …but that’s not the full line-up. I’m still gathering together the last few pieces of the day’s puzzle. But I’ve got to say, I’m already ridiculously excited to hear what everyone has to say.

The expanded scope of the line-up means that the ticket price is a bit more this year—last year’s event was laughably cheap—but it’s still a ridiculously low price: just £80 plus VAT, bringing it to a grand total of just £96 all in. That’s unheard of for a line-up of this calibre.

I’m planning to put tickets on sale on two weeks from today on March 25th. Last year’s Responsive Day Out was insanely popular and sold out almost immediately. Make sure you grab your ticket straight away.

To get in the mood, you might want to listen to the podcast or watch the videos from last year.

See you in Brighton on June 27th. This is going to be fun!

(By the way, if your company fancies dropping a few grand to sponsor an after-party for Responsive Day Out 2: The Revenge, let me know. The low-cost, no-frills approach means that right now, there’s no after-party planned, but if your company threw one, they would earn the undying gratitude of hundreds of geeks.)

Responsive audio out