Tags: screenreader

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Testing

It’s tempting to think of testing with screen-readers as being like testing with browsers. With browser testing, you’re checking to see how a particular piece of software deals with the code you’re throwing at it. A screen reader is a piece of software too, so it makes sense to approach it the same way, right?

I don’t think so. I think it’s really important that if someone is going to test your site with a screen reader, it should be someone who uses a screen reader every day.

Think of it this way: you wouldn’t want a designer or developer to do usability testing by testing the design or code on themselves. That wouldn’t give you any useful data. They’re already familiar with what problems the design is supposed to be solving, and how the interface works. That’s why you need to do usability testing with someone from outside, someone who wasn’t involved in the design or development process.

It’s no different when it comes to users of assistive technology. You’re not trying to test their technology; you’re trying to test how well the thing you’re building works for the person using the technology.

In short:

Don’t think of screen-reader testing as a form of browser testing; think of it as a form of usability testing.

ABC

When I finally unveiled the redesigned and overhauled version of The Session at the end of 2012, it was the culmination of a lot of late nights and weekends. It was also a really great learning experience, one that I subsequently drew on to inform my An Event Apart presentation, The Long Web.

As part of that presentation, I give a little backstory on the ABC format. It’s a way of notating music using nothing more than ASCII text. It begins with some JSON-like metadata about the tune—its title, time signature, and key—followed by the notes of the tune itself—uppercase and lowercase letters denote different octaves, and numbers can be used to denote length:

X: 1
T: Cooley's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Edor
|:D2|EBBA B2 EB|B2 AB dBAG|FDAD BDAD|FDAD dAFD|
EBBA B2 EB|B2 AB defg|afec dBAF|DEFD E2:|
|:gf|eB B2 efge|eB B2 gedB|A2 FA DAFA|A2 FA defg|
eB B2 eBgB|eB B2 defg|afec dBAF|DEFD E2:|

On The Session, a little bit of progressive enhancement produces a nice crisp SVG version of the sheet music at the user’s request (the non-JavaScript fallback is a server-rendered bitmap of the sheet music).

ABC notation dates back to the early nineties, a time of very limited bandwidth. Exchanging audio files or even images would have been prohibitively expensive. Having software installed on your machine that could convert ABC into sheet music or audio meant that people could share and exchange tunes through email, BBS, or even the then-fledgling World Wide Web.

In today’s world of relatively fast connections, ABC’s usefulness might seemed lessened. But in fact, it’s just as popular as it ever was. People have become used to writing (and even sight-reading) the format, and it has all the resilience that comes with being a text format; easily editable, and human-readable. It’s still the format that people use to submit new tune settings to The Session.

A little while back, I came upon another advantage of the ABC format, one that I had never previously thought of…

The Session has a wide range of users, of all ages, from all over the world, from all walks of life, using all sorts of browsers. I do my best to make sure that the site works for just about any kind of user-agent (while still providing plenty of enhancements for the most modern browsers). That includes screen readers. Some active members of The Session happen to be blind.

One of those screen-reader users got in touch with me shortly after joining to ask me to explain what ABC was all about. I pointed them at some explanatory links. Once the format “clicked” with them, they got quite enthused. They pointed out that if the sheet music were only available as an image, it would mean very little to them. But by providing the ABC notation alongside the sheet music, they could read the music note-for-note.

That’s when it struck me that ABC notation is effectively alt text for sheet music!

There’s one little thing that slightly irks me though. The ABC notation should be read out one letter at a time. But screen readers use a kind of fuzzy logic to figure out whether a set of characters should be spoken as a word:

Screen readers try to pronounce acronyms and nonsensical words if they have sufficient vowels/consonants to be pronounceable; otherwise, they spell out the letters. For example, NASA is pronounced as a word, whereas NSF is pronounced as “N. S. F.” The acronym URL is pronounced “earl,” even though most humans say “U. R. L.” The acronym SQL is not pronounced “sequel” by screen readers even though some humans pronounce it that way; screen readers say “S. Q. L.”

It’s not a big deal, and the screen reader user can explicitly request that a word be spoken letter by letter:

Screen reader users can pause if they didn’t understand a word, and go back to listen to it; they can even have the screen reader read words letter by letter. When reading words letter by letter, JAWS distinguishes between upper case and lower case letters by shouting/emphasizing the upper case letters.

But still …I wish there were some way that I could mark up the ABC notation so that a screen reader would know that it should be read letter by letter. I’ve looked into using abbr, but that offers no guarantees: if the string looks like a word, it will still be spoken as a word. It doesn’t look there’s any ARIA settings for this use-case either.

So if any accessibility experts out there know of something I’m missing, please let me know.

Update: I’ve added an aural CSS declaration of speak: spell-out (thanks to Martijn van der Ven for the tip), although I think the browser support is still pretty non-existent. Any other ideas?