Tags: video

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Video video

Hey, remember Responsive Day Out 3: The Final Breakpoint? Remember all those great talks?

No?

Perhaps your memory needs refreshing.

Luckily for you, all the talks were recorded. The audio has been available for a while. Now the videos are also available for your viewing pleasure.

  1. Alice Bartlett
  2. Rachel Shillcock
  3. Alla Kholmatova
  4. Peter Gasston
  5. Jason Grigsby
  6. Heydon Pickering
  7. Jake Archibald
  8. Ruth John
  9. Zoe Mickley Gillenwater
  10. Rosie Campbell
  11. Lyza Gardner
  12. Aaron Gustafson

Thanks to Craig and Amie from Five Simple Steps for coming to Brighton to record the videos—really appreciate it. And thanks to Shopify for sponsoring the videos; covering the cost of the videos meant that we could keep the ticket price low.

What a day out! What a lovely responsive day out!

Huffduffing video

You know what would be awesome? If you could huffduff the audio from videos on YouTube, Vimeo, and other video hosting sites.

To give you an example, A List Apart recently started running online events and once the events are over, they pop ‘em onto YouTube. Now, I’m not saying I don’t want to look at those lovely faces for an hour, but if truth be told, it’s the audio that I’m really interested in.

In the past, my only recourse would’ve been to pester the good people at A List Apart to export audio as well as video, in much the same way as I’ve pestered conference organisers in the past:

I wish conference organisers would export the audio of any talks that they’re publishing as video. Creating the sound file at that point is a simple one-click step. But once the videos are up online—be it on YouTube or Vimeo—it’s a lot, lot harder to get just the audio.

Not everyone wants to watch video. In fact, I bet there are plenty of people who listen to conference talks by opening the video in a separate tab so they can listen to it while they do something else.

Some people have come up with clever workarounds to get the audio track from videos into Huffduffer but they’re fairly convoluted.

Until now!

The brilliant Ryan Barrett has just launched huffduff-video:

He has created a bookmarklet you can use whenever you’re on a YouTube or Vimeo page that you want to huffduff. It works a treat—I’ve already used to huffduff that A List Apart event and a talk by Matt Jones.

It takes a little while to do the initial conversion but you can just leave the pop-up window open while it works its magic. I’ve incorporated it into the Huffduffer bookmarklet now too. So if you’re on a YouTube or Vimeo page, you can hit the usual bookmarklet and it’ll route you through Ryan’s clever creation.

That’s makes two fantastic pieces of software from Ryan that have improved my online life immeasurably: first Bridgy and now huffduff-video. So nifty!

dConstruct 2013 videos

All the videos from last year’s dConstruct have been posted on Vimeo (with a backup on the Internet Archive). If you were there, you can re-live the fun all over again. And if you weren’t there, you can see just what you missed:

  1. Amber Case
  2. Luke Wroblewski
  3. Nicole Sullivan
  4. Simone Rebaudengo
  5. Sarah Angliss
  6. Keren Elazari
  7. Maciej Cegłowski
  8. Dan Williams
  9. Adam Buxton

Don’t forget the audio is also available for your listening pleasure. Slap the RSS feed into the podcasting application of your choosing.

Revisiting the brilliance of last year’s dConstruct should get you in the mood for this year’s event. Put the date in your calendar: Friday, September 5th. Last year was all about Communicating With Machines. This year will be all about Living With The Network.

More details will be unveiled soon (he said, hoping to cultivate a feeling of mystery and invoke a sense of anticipation).

Promo

The lovely and talented Paul and Kelly from Maxine Denver were in the Clearleft office to do some video work last week. After finishing a piece I was in, I suggested they keep “rolling” (to use an anachronistic term) so I could do a little tongue-in-cheek piece about the Clearleft device lab, a la Winnebago Man.

Here’s the result.

It reminded me of something, but I couldn’t figure out what. Then I remembered.

Cool your eyes don’t change

At last November’s Build conference I gave a talk on digital preservation called All Our Yesterdays:

Our communication methods have improved over time, from stone tablets, papyrus, and vellum through to the printing press and the World Wide Web. But while the web has democratised publishing, allowing anyone to share ideas with a global audience, it doesn’t appear to be the best medium for preserving our cultural resources: websites and documents disappear down the digital memory hole every day. This presentation will look at the scale of the problem and propose methods for tackling our collective data loss.

The video is now on vimeo.

The audio has been huffduffed.

Adactio: Articles—All Our Yesterdays on Huffduffer

I’ve published a transcription over in the “articles” section.

I blogged a list of relevant links shortly after the presentation.

You can also download the slides or view them on speakerdeck but, as usual, they won’t make much sense out of context.

I hope you’ll enjoy watching or reading or listening to the talk as much as I enjoyed presenting it.

Audio Update

Aral recently released the videos from last September’s Update conference. You can watch the video of my talk if you like or, if video isn’t your bag, I’ve published a transcription of the talk.

It’s called One Web, Many Devices and I’m pretty happy with how it turned out. It’s a short talk—just under 17 minutes—but I think I made my point well, without any um-ing and ah-ing. At the time I described the talk like this:

I went in to the lion’s den to encourage the assembled creative minds to forego the walled garden of Apple’s app store in favour of the open web.

It certainly got people talking. Addy Osmani wrote an op-ed piece in .net magazine after seeing the talk.

The somewhat contentious talk was followed by an even more contentious panel, which Amber described as Jeremy Keith vs. Everyone Else. The video of that panel has been published too. My favourite bit is around the five-minute mark where I nailed my colours to the mast.

Me: I’m not going to create something specifically for Windows Phone 7. I’m not going to create a specific Windows Phone 7 app. I’m not going to create a specific iPhone app or a specific Android app because I have as much interest in doing that as I do in creating a CD-ROM or a Laserdisc…

Aral: I don’t think that’s a valid analogy.

Me: Give it time.

But I am creating stuff that can be accessed on all those devices because an iPhone and Windows Phone 7 and Android—they all come with web browsers.

I was of course taking a deliberately extreme stance and, as I said at the time, the truthful answer to most of the questions raised during the panel discussion is “it depends” …but that would’ve made for a very dull panel.

Unfortunately the audio of the talks and panels from Update hasn’t been published—just videos. I’ve managed to extract an mp3 file of my talk which involved going to some dodgy warez sitez.

Adactio: Articles—One Web, Many Devices on Huffduffer

I wish conference organisers would export the audio of any talks that they’re publishing as video. Creating the sound file at that point is a simple one-click step. But once the videos are up online—be it on YouTube or Vimeo—it’s a lot, lot harder to get just the audio.

Not everyone wants to watch video. In fact, I bet there are plenty of people who listen to conference talks by opening the video in a separate tab so they can listen to it while they do something else. That’s one of the advantages of publishing conference audio: it allows people to catch up on talks without having to devote all their senses. I’ve written about this before:

Not that I have anything against the moving image; it’s just that television, film and video demand more from your senses. Lend me your ears! and your eyes. With your ears and eyes engaged, it’s pretty hard to do much else. So the default position for enjoying television is sitting down.

A purely audio channel demands only aural attention. That means that radio—and be extension, podcasts—can be enjoyed at the same time as other actions; walking around, working out at the gym. Perhaps it’s this symbiotic, rather than parasitic, arrangement that I find engaging.

When I was chatting with Jesse from SFF Audio he told me how he often puts video podcasts (vodcasts?) on to his iPod/iPhone but then listens to them with the device in his pocket. That’s quite a waste of bandwidth but if no separate audio is made available, the would-be listener is left with no choice.

SFFaudio with Jeremy Keith on Huffduffer

So conference organisers: please, please take a second or two to export an audio file if you’re publishing a video. Thanks.

What technology wants

Technology enabled Sarah Churman to hear for the first time.

enabled her to capture that moment.

Networked technology enabled her to share that moment with the world.

enabled me to share it with you.

L33t ski11z

Here are three life skills I have learned from the internet:

  1. How to fold a T-shirt in 2 seconds.
  2. How to peel a banana like a monkey. (Thanks, Kyle!)
  3. How to tie my shoelaces correctly.

You’re welcome.

Talking the talk

I’ve been doing a fair bit of yakking lately, all recorded for posterity.

First off, I had a chat with Tim from Design Critique on Ajax design considerations, mostly recapping what I talked about UI13 last year.

Jeremy Keith on Ajax design considerations on Huffduffer

After that, I had a natter with Ross from Web Axe, this time focusing on practical web accessibility.

Web Axe Episode 75: Jeremy Keith interview, Google Wave on Huffduffer

Then Andy, Rich and I paid a visit to the Boagworld crew out in the back of beyond where we had a free-for-all five-way chat about Clearleft and Headscape.

Boagworld 188: Clearscape Or Headleft? on Huffduffer

Lastly, I had a video chat with Ryan Taylor for his series, Please Start From The Beginning.

Please start from the beginning… with Jeremy Keith

Add them all up and you’ve got a veritable aural onslaught. If you manage to make it through all of those, then you will almost certainly be very weary of listening to my voice.

See me speak

While I was in Nashville for the Voices That Matter conference, I sat down for an enjoyable little chat with Nikki McDonald. It began with a discussion of my uncanny resemblance to Severus Snape before moving on to more webby matters.

I also had a great three-way chat with Christopher Schmitt and Steve Krug. Christopher has posted up a transcript of the conversation

If you’re not completely sick of hearing me natter on and you are in Brighton on Tuesday evening, come along to £5 App where I’ll be babbling about Huffduffer. I know it clashes with the Flash Brighton screening of Sita Sings the Blues but you can watch that online anytime, right?

Sound and vision

Every creation of Tony Wilson’s was labelled with the letters followed by a number. The first poster was FAC1. was FAC51.

The Joy Division album was FACT10. The album artwork was designed by Peter Saville. The words “Unknown Pleasures” don’t appear on the cover. Neither do the words “Joy Division”. Instead, the cover contains a series of 100 lines representing pulses from —thanks to . It was a groundbreaking piece of graphic design. Its beauty lies in its simplicity: a two-dimensional representation of raw data.

That was almost thirty years ago. This week Radiohead released the video for the song House of Cards from the album In Rainbows …except it isn’t really a video at all. It wasn’t shot on film or video. It is a three-dimensional representation of raw data.

You can play with the data visualisation, altering it while the song plays. You can even download the raw data. You are not just allowed to play around with the data, you are encouraged to do so. There’s a YouTube group for aggregating the results.

Suddenly every other music video seems very flat and passive. I’m reminded of a prescient passage from Douglas Adams’s essay How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Internet:

I expect that history will show “normal” mainstream twentieth century media to be the aberration in all this.

Please, miss, you mean they could only just sit there and watch? They couldn’t do anything? Didn’t everybody feel terribly isolated or alienated or ignored?

Yes, child, that’s why they all went mad. Before the Restoration.

What was the Restoration again, please, miss?

The end of the twentieth century, child. When we started to get interactivity back.

FooVid

At the end of the that I was at two months ago, the good folks at O’Reilly offered attendees the chance to share their thoughts on the weekend. So after 48 hours of sleep deprivation, some of us looked into a camera and performed mini braindumps.

Ignorance and inspiration

The topic of accessibility on the Web is, for any professional developer, an important topic. While there are differing degrees of knowledge and experience when it comes to Web accessibility, I was under the impression that it is generally acknowledged as being a good thing.

Then the Target lawsuit came along. The overwhelming response was from ignorant, ill-informed people was that this was a frivolous lawsuit—an example of political correctness gone mad. What really depressed me was reading those opinions in the Sitepoint forum, the kind of place where you would expect Web professionals to congregate. Ignorance and greed were the order of the day:

If they where blind then why would they be on the computer?

I highly doubt that a blind person would ever try to purchase something from the internet WITHOUT the help of another human being.

How is an ATL-text going to be usfull so someone that cant see it? [sic]

Depressing stuff. Now that the Target case is going ahead as a class-action lawsuit, it’s back on the radar. Techcrunch picked up the story and has spawned some unbelievably FUD-laden comments:

Thats just stupid…whats next Driver licenses for the blind?

This is just another example of the needs of the one — no matter how ridiculous those so-called needs — will become a burden for the many.

How Selfish. Instead of re inventing the wheel, all they have to do is ask a friend or family member to help them.

Oh, and something which I would like to know, since a few people mentioned eCommerce — How does a blind person read their account number on a credit card?

As well as confirming my suspicions about the kind of pond scum who choose to frequent TechCrunch, those comments made me depressed all over again.

But wait… Roger rides to the rescue with videos of people using assistive technology—a timely reminder of just how empowering technology can be.

There’s a series of videos on the AssistWare site. They’re all worth checking out if, like me, you want to dispel TechCrunch’s whingers and moaners and listen instead to the inspiring stories of people getting on with it:

These stories remind me of the transformative power of technology. They also serve up a nice big dollop of perspective. Frankly, keeping websites accessible is one of the easiest ways to help improve the world a little bit every day. If that’s asking too much of the SitePointers and TechCrunchers, then they really have no good reason to build websites in the first place.

Breaking boxes with Brian

It all started with some silliness at The Highland Fling. With the shwag preparation complete, the volunteers created a wall of cardboard boxes and we filmed Brian’s head-on assault.

Fast forward to dConstruct 2007. The bag stuffing and schwag prep was all wrapped up the day before the conference. There were packing boxes aplenty. Said boxes were quickly stacked into an edifice of cardboard and cameras were unsheathed.

Here are three angles (more will probably follow):

Breaking boxes with Brian

Microformats 1:01—Exporting microformats via bluetooth

On the last day of XTech 2007 I abducted Ian and forced him to shoot a quick video of a microformats demo that I didn’t have a chance to include in my presentation.

The video is one minute and one second long. It’s a quick demo of John McKerrell’s bluetooth version of the Tails plugin.

YouTube

Here’s a transcript of the 1:01 minutes of video:

This is my website. This is my mobile phone. My website has microformats. This is a version of the Tails plugin for Firefox. It exposes all the microformats I have on my website. I can convert and export those microformats as vcard, iCal, whatever I want. With this version of the plugin I can also export to bluetooth. So let’s take an event for example. I click on bluetooth. My computer asks me which device to export to. I have previously paired up my phone. So now I’m going to send the event to that device. And there we go. I have now exported from the World Wide Web onto my mobile phone. Easy!

The video is released under a Creative Commons attribution license. You are free to share, remix, caption and translate this video (as long as you provide attribution).

The Empire Moves House

A few weeks ago, Norm! was down in Brighton to visit Jessica and myself (he came bearing gifts of Flickr schwag). In the course of his visit, we paid a visit to the local lego shop. Norm! bought a B-Wing bomber and Jessica bought a TIE interceptor — they may think of themselves as Star Wars fans but I wiped the floor with them when we played Star Wars Trivial Pursuit.

We were discussing our impending move and Norm! made Jessica promise that when she was bringing the TIE interceptor to the new flat, she would have to:

  1. keep it one piece and
  2. fly it down the street making TIE fighter engine noises.

Well, the move continues apace. Jessica and I have managed to get most of our junk over to the new flat. True to her word, Jessica flew her lego TIE interceptor through the streets of Brighton.