Links

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Monday, January 16th, 2017

The Line of Death – text/plain

A thoroughly fascinating look at which parts of a browser’s interface are available to prevent phishing attacks, and which parts are available to enable phishing attacks. It’s like trench warfare for pixels.

Bring on the Flood · thewalrus.ca

Most of these dystopian scenarios are, after all, post-apocalyptic: the bad thing happened, the tension broke, and now so much less is at stake. The anxiety and ambivalence we feel toward late-stage capitalism, income inequality, political corruption, and environmental degradation—acute psychological pandemics in the here and now—are utterly dissolved. In a strange, wicked way, the aftermath feels fine.

Sunday, January 15th, 2017

Using the aria-current attribute – Tink

The aria-current attribute is very handy and easy to implement. Léonie explains it really well here.

Modernizing our Progressive Enhancement Delivery | Filament Group, Inc., Boston, MA

Scott runs through the latest improvements to the Filament Group website. There’s a lot about HTTP2, but also a dab of service workers (using a similar recipe to my site).

Browser Support for evergreen websites

Oh, how I wished everyone approached building for the web the way that Rachel does. Smart, sensible, pragmatic, and exciting!

How E.T. Really Called Home (PDF)

A 1983 article from 73 Magazine on the surprisingly plausible Rube Goldberg/Heath Robinson device created by E.T. to call home.

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

Saving you bandwidth on Google+ through machine learning

This is an interesting use of voodoo magic (or “machine learning” as we call it now) by Google to interpolate data in a small image to create a larger version. A win for performance.

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

ryanmcdermott/clean-code-javascript: Clean Code concepts adapted for JavaScript

This looks a sensible approach to writing clean JavaScript.

A Tale of Four Caches · Yoav Weiss

A cute explanation of different browser caches:

  • memory cache,
  • service worker cache,
  • disk cache, and
  • push cache.

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

Mentorship, From the Notebook of Aaron Gustafson

Here’s a great opportunity for somebody looking to level up in web development—mentorship from the one and only Aaron Gustafson.

Stargazing Live, 2017 : Outreach : Physics and Astronomy : University of Sussex

There’s going to be an evening of astro events out at Sussex University next Wednesday, January 18th. Stargazing, an inflatable planetarium, and the Ensonglopedia of science—fun for all the family!

Monday, January 9th, 2017

The Futures of Typography

A wonderfully thoughtful piece from Robin, ranging from the printing technologies of the 15th century right up to the latest web technologies. It’s got all my favourite things in there: typography, digital preservation, and service workers. Marvellous!

Resilient Web Design | susan jean robertson

Well, this is nice! Susan has listed the passages she highlighted from Resilient Web Design.

In the spirit of the book, I read it in a browser, and I broke up my highlights by chapters. As usual, you should read the book yourself, these highlights are taken out of context and better when you’ve read the whole thing.

Typora — a minimal markdown reading & writing app

This looks like an interesting little Markdown editor. I think I’ll take it for a spin.

Friday, January 6th, 2017

Redesign v15 Notes | CSS-Tricks

Chris redesigned CSS Tricks and it’s got some really nice touches. I particularly like the stacked card view on mobile.

From Tape Drives to Memory Orbs, the Data Formats of Star Wars Suck (Spoilers) | Motherboard

As always with sci-fi interfaces, the important part is telling the story, not realism or accuracy. Personally, I liked the way that the World War II trappings of Rogue One extended to communications and networking technologies.

A Day in the Life of Americans | FlowingData

Watching this data visualisation on its high speed setting is quite hypnotic.

Making stuff from scratch in the wild

Making fire, building shelter, throwing spears …all useful post-apocalyptic skills documented on the primitive technology blog.

Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology. If this hobby interests you then this blog might be what you are looking for.