Archive: March 9th, 2016

Widespread XSS Vulnerabilities in Ad Network Code Affecting Top Tier Publishers, Retailers - Randy Westergren

An a revelation that comes as a shock to absolutely no one, the JavaScript injected by ad networks can be used as a vector for attack.

This industry-wide problem serves as a great example of how 3rd-party components can compromise the security of an otherwise secure site.

One more reason to install an ad blocker.

Design is choice by Jaime Caballero

A lovely outlook on designing with progressive enhancement:

There will always be users coming from places you didn’t expect, using devices you didn’t test for.

Simon McManus - YouTube

Come for the videos of EnhanceConf. Stay for the skateboarding beagle.

Material Conference 2016 by Joschi Kuphal & Brian Suda — Kickstarter

I’m am soooo there!

Iceland, July 22nd: a conference about the material of the web …right up my alley.

You can get a ticket by backing the project on Kickstarter. Be sure to check out all the options.

See you in Reykjavík!

IndieWeb — Deine Daten. Dein Netz. | Vortrag auf dem Webkongress Erlangen 2016 | Joschi Kuphal

It’s in German, but this presentation by Joschi is a great introduction to Indie Web ideas and building blocks.

ForEveryone.net

A film about Tim Berners-Lee and the World Wide Web. Details are scarce right now but watch this space.

An update (March 2016) on the current state & recommendations for JavaScript …

Making web apps? Care about SEO? Here’s Google’s advice:

Use feature detection & progressive enhancement techniques to make your content available to all users.

Styling Broken Images

This is really, really clever. You can’t use generated content (:before and :after) on replaced content. The img element is replaced content …but only when the image actually loads. So if the image fails to load, you can apply specific fallback styles (using :before and :after).

Why I like the new Met logo (and why you should give it a chance): Design Observer

Michael Bierut on that logo …and graphic design in general.

Graphic designers, whether we admit it or not, are trained for the short term. Most of the things we design have to discharge their function immediately, whether it’s a design for a book or a poster, a website or an infographic, a sign system, or a business card. In school critiques, architecture and industrial design students produce models. Graphic designers produce finished prototypes. As a result, the idea that we create things that are unfinished, that can only accrue value over time, is foreign to us. It’s so easy for us to visualize the future, and so hard to admit that we really can’t. That’s what we face every time we unveil a new logo.