Archive: February, 2017

46

sparkline
                    5th                     10th                     15th                     20th                     25th               
12am        
4am  
8am        
12pm                    
4pm            
8pm              

Sunday, February 26th, 2017

Saturday, February 25th, 2017

Social Media Needs A Travel Mode (Idle Words)

We don’t take our other valuables with us when we travel—we leave the important stuff at home, or in a safe place. But Facebook and Google don’t give us similar control over our valuable data. With these online services, it’s all or nothing.

We need a ‘trip mode’ for social media sites that reduces our contact list and history to a minimal subset of what the site normally offers.

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

Send messages when you’re back online with Service Workers and Background Sync – Twilio Cloud Communications Blog

This example of using background sync looks like it’s specific to Twilio, but the breakdown of steps is broad enough to apply to many situations:

On the page we need to:

  1. Register a Service Worker
  2. Intercept the “submit” event for our message form
  3. Place the message details into IndexedDB, an in browser database
  4. Register the Service Worker to receive a “sync” event

Then, in the Service Worker we need to:

  1. Listen for sync events
  2. When a sync event is received, retrieve the messages from IndexedDB
  3. For each message, send a request to our server to send the message
  4. If the message is sent successfully, then remove the message from IndexedDB

And that’s it.

ongoing by Tim Bray · Geek Career Paths

Tim Bray lists the options available to a technically-minded person thinking about their career path …but doesn’t mention the option of working at an agency.

Some good long-zoom observations in here:

The bad news that it’s a lot of work. We’re a young pro­fes­sion and we’re still work­ing out our best prac­tices, so the ground keeps chang­ing un­der you; it doesn’t get eas­i­er as the decades go by.

The good news is that it doesn’t get hard­er ei­ther. Once you learn to stop ex­pect­ing your knowl­edge to stay fresh, the pace of in­no­va­tion doesn’t feel to me like it’s much faster (or slow­er) now than it was in 1987 or 1997 or 2007. More good news: The tech­nol­o­gy gets bet­ter. Se­ri­ous­ly, we are so much bet­ter at build­ing soft­ware now than we used to be in any of those oth­er years end­ing in 7.

[this is aaronland] fault lines — a cultural heritage of misaligned expectations

When Aaron talks, I listen. This time he’s talking about digital (and analogue) preservation, and how that can clash with licensing rules.

It is time for the sector to pick a fight with artists, and artist’s estates and even your donors. It is time for the sector to pick a fight with anyone that is preventing you from being allowed to have a greater — and I want to stress greater, not total — license of interpretation over the works which you are charged with nurturing and caring for.

It is time to pick a fight because, at least on bad days, I might even suggest that the sector has been played. We all want to outlast the present, and this is especially true of artists. Museums and libraries and archives are a pretty good bet if that’s your goal.

Monday, February 20th, 2017

Do we need a new heading element? We don’t know - JakeArchibald.com

Jake is absolutely spot-on here. There’s been a lot of excited talk about adding an h element to HTML but it all seems to miss the question of why the currently-specced outline algorithm hasn’t been implemented.

This is a common mistake in standards discussion — a mistake I’ve made many times before. You cannot compare the current state of things, beholden to reality, with a utopian implementation of some currently non-existent thing.

If you’re proposing something almost identical to something that failed, you better know why your proposal will succeed where the other didn’t.

Jake rightly points out that the first step isn’t to propose a whole new element; it’s to ask “Why haven’t browsers implemented the outline for sectioned headings?”

(I added a small historical note in the comments pointing to the first occurrence of this proposal way back in 1991.)

Sunday, February 19th, 2017

Saturday, February 18th, 2017

Friday, February 17th, 2017

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

Winston Churchill’s essay on alien life found : Nature News & Comment

Churchill, as it turns out, had some pretty solid ideas on SETI.

Churchill was a science enthusiast and advocate, but he also contemplated important scientific questions in the context of human values. Particularly given today’s political landscape, elected leaders should heed Churchill’s example: appoint permanent science advisers and make good use of them.

Wednesday, February 15th, 2017

Monday, February 13th, 2017

Sunday, February 12th, 2017

Accessibility and Performance | MarcySutton.com

When I heard about Universal JavaScript apps (a.k.a. isomorphic JavaScript), despite the “framework hotness”, I saw real value for accessibility and performance together. With this technique, a JavaScript app is rendered as a complete HTML payload from the server using Node.js, which is then upgraded as client resources download and execute. All of a sudden your Angular app could be usable a lot sooner, even without browser JS. Bells started going off in my head: “this could help accessible user experience, too!”

Friday, February 10th, 2017

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

Most of the web really sucks if you have a slow connection

Just like many people develop with an average connection speed in mind, many people have a fixed view of who a user is. Maybe they think there are customers with a lot of money with fast connections and customers who won’t spend money on slow connections. That is, very roughly speaking, perhaps true on average, but sites don’t operate on average, they operate in particular domains.

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

Monday, February 6th, 2017

Saturday, February 4th, 2017

Friday, February 3rd, 2017

The Problem With AMP | 80x24

The largest complaint by far is that the URLs for AMP links differ from the canonical URLs for the same content, making sharing difficult. The current URLs are a mess.

This is something that the Google gang are aware of, and they say they’re working on a fix. But this post points out some other misgivings with AMP, like its governance policy:

This keeps the AMP HTML specification squarely in the hands of Google, who will be able to take it in any direction that they see fit without input from the community at large. This guise of openness is perhaps even worse than the Apple News Format, which at the very least does not pretend to be an open standard.

Isomorphic rendering on the JAM Stack

Phil describes the process of implementing the holy grail of web architecture (which perhaps isn’t as difficult as everyone seems to think it is):

I have been experimenting with something that seemed obvious to me for a while. A web development model which gives a pre-rendered, ready-to-consume, straight-into-the-eyeballs web page at every URL of a site. One which, once loaded, then behaves like a client-side, single page app.

Now that’s resilient web design!

“Is This Helpful?” » Mike Industries

I like Mike’s “long zoom” view here where the glass is half full and half empty:

Several years from now, I want to be able to look back on this time the same way people look at other natural disasters. Without that terrible earthquake, we would have never improved our building codes. Without that terrible flood, we would have never built those levees. Without that terrible hurricane, we would have never rebuilt this amazing city. Without that terrible disease, we would have never developed antibodies against it.

It doesn’t require giving any credit to the disaster. The disaster will always be a complete fucking disaster. But it does involve using the disaster as an opportunity to take a hard look at what got us here and rededicate our energy towards things that will get us out.

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017