Archive: November 15th, 2017

Constellation

Language conjures the world into being.

Just type stuff.

Relative Requirements – CSS Wizardry

I really like this exercise by Harry. I’ve done similar kinds of grading using dot-voting in the past. It feels like an early step to establishing design principles: “this over that.”

By deciding what we value up-front, we have an agreement that we can look back on in order to help us settle these conflicts and get us back on track again.

Relative Requirements remove the personal aspect of these disagreements and instead focuses on more objective agreements that we made as a team.

Eric’s Archived Thoughts: Declining Complexity in CSS

I think Eric is absolutely right. The barrier to entry for accomplishing what you want with CSS is much lower now. It only seems more complicated if you’re used to doing things the old way.

I envy “the kids”, the ones just starting to learn front end now. They’re likely never going to know the pain of float drop, or wrestling with inline blocks, or not being able to center along one axis. They’re going to roll their eyes when we old-timers start grumbling about the old days and say, “Floats?!? Who ever thought floats would be a good way to lay out a page? That’s totally not what they’re for, anyone can see that! Were you all high as a kite, or just utterly stupid?” You know, the way “the kids” talked ten years ago, except then it was about using tables for layout.

What makes a good design principle? || Matthew Ström: designer & developer

These are really good ideas for evaluating design principles. In fact, I would go so far as to say they are design principles for design principles.

  • Good design principles are memorable
  • Good design principles help you say no.
  • Good design principles aren’t truisms.
  • Good design principles are applicable.

Design Guidelines — The way products are built.

A collection of publicly available design systems, pattern libraries, and interface guidelines.