Link tags: activity

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4 Rules for Intuitive UX – Learn UI Design

  1. Obey the Law of Locality
  2. ABD: Anything But Dropdowns
  3. Pass the Squint Test
  4. Teach by example

How do you mark up an accordion? — Sara Soueidan

I love this deep dive that Sara takes into the question of marking up content for progressive disclosure. It reminds me Dan’s SimpleQuiz from back in the day.

Then there’s this gem, which I think is a terrificly succinct explanation of the importance of meaningful markup:

It’s always necessary, in my opinion, to consider what content would render and look like in foreign environments, or in environments that are not controlled by our own styles and scripts. Writing semantic HTML is the first step in achieving truly resilient Web sites and applications.

Badging API Explainer

Here’s an intriguing proposal that would allow web apps to indicate activity in an icon (like an unread count) in the same way that native apps can.

This is an interesting one because, in this case, it’s not just browsers that would have to implement it, but operating systems as well.

Your Interactive Makes Me Sick - Features - Source: An OpenNews project

Browsers have had consistent scrolling behavior for years, even across vendors and platforms. There’s an established set of physics, and if you muck with the physics, you can assume you’re making some people sick.

Guidelines to consider before adding swooshy parallax effects:

  1. Respect the Physics
  2. Remember that We Call Them “Readers”
  3. Ask for Consent

Given all the work that goes into a powerful piece of journalism—research, interviews, writing, fact-checking, editing, design, coding, testing—is it really in our best interests to end up with a finished product that some people literally can’t bear to scroll through?

Why Web Developers Need to Care about Interactivity — Philip Walton

Just to be clear, this isn’t about interaction design, it’s about how browsers and become unresponsive to interaction when they’re trying to parse the truckloads of Javascript web developers throw at them.

Top tip: lay off the JavaScript. HTML is interactive instantly.

The First Web Apps: 5 Apps That Shaped the Internet as We Know It

A great bit of web history spelunking in search of the first websites that allowed users to interact with data on a server. Applications, if you will. It’s well written, but I take issue with this:

The world wide web wasn’t supposed to be this fun. Berners-Lee imagined the internet as a place to collaborate around text, somewhere to share research data and thesis papers.

This often gets trotted out (“the web was intended for scientists sharing documents”), but it’s simply not true that Tim Berners-Lee was only thinking of his immediate use-case; he deliberately made the WWW project broad enough to allow all sorts of thitherto unforeseen uses. If he hadn’t …well, the web wouldn’t have been able to accommodate all those later developments. It’s not an accident that the web was later used for all sorts of unexpected things—that was the whole idea.

Anyway, apart from that misstep, the rest of the article is a fun piece, well worth reading.

It is as if you were doing work

Stop dilly-dallying and just get this work done, okay?

A Day in the Life of Americans | FlowingData

Watching this data visualisation on its high speed setting is quite hypnotic.

Standardizing the Social Web

The slides from Aaron’s talk at OS Bridge in Portland, looking at the formats and protocols powering the indie web.

Jeremy Keith: Paranormal Interactivity on Vimeo

This is the talk I gave at An Event Apart through 2010. It’s all about interaction design with some examples from Huffduffer.

This Place is Not a Place of Honor on Vimeo

A demo reel for the proposed solution to a very, very, very long term problem.

XFN Activity - David Singleton

This is seriously brilliant. Starting from a single URL (adactio.com), a lifestream is creating based on XFN rel="me" links. David Singleton wins the internet.