Tags: ala

56

sparkline

MaintainableCSS - an approach to writing modular, scalable and maintainable CSS | By Adam Silver

Adam Silver has written a free online book all about writing maintainable CSS. It dives straight into naming things and takes it from there.

MaintainableCSS is an approach to writing modular, scalable and of course, maintainable CSS.

The Palate Deck: Playing Cards for Beer Tasting by Dave Shea — Kickstarter

Dave’s Kickstarter project looks like it could be very handy on Fridays a beer o’clock in the Clearleft office.

A Redesign with CSS Shapes · An A List Apart Article

Eric walks through a really nice use of CSS shapes and @supports on a page of the An Event Apart site.

It’s a nice little illustration of how we can use advanced features of CSS right now, without the usual wait for widespread support.

Can’t code, won’t code - cracking the secret of gender imbalance in STEM

Adult training represents a way into coding for millions of women who never learnt when they were younger. Meetups such as those run by organisations such as Women Who Code and Codebar can introduce women to the collaborative, problem-solving world of programming.

Adapting to Input · An A List Apart Article

Jason breaks down the myths of inputs being tied to device form factors. Instead, given the inherent uncertainty around input, the only sensible approach is progressive enhancement.

Now is the time to experiment with new forms of web input. The key is to build a baseline input experience that works everywhere and then progressively enhance to take advantage of new capabilities of devices if they are available.

Making your JavaScript Pure · An A List Apart Article

I really like this piece by Jack. All the things he’s talking about—pure functions and referential transparency—are terms I was previously unfamiliar with …but the concepts smell familiar. It’s good to have terminology (and reasoning) to apply to the way I structure my JavaScript.

OOUX: A Foundation for Interaction Design · An A List Apart Article

I really, really like this approach. I’ve used something similar in my responsive design workshops, where I get people to break things down into nouns and verbs (objects and actions). I think there’s a lot of crossover with good URL design here too—this is kind of like REST for UX designers.

CSS and Scalability

Some good thoughts in here about writing scalable CSS …although the finger-pointing at sites (that are shipping at scale) reminds me a bit of that quote by copywriter Paul Butterworth: “Where the heck were you when the page was blank?”

The Pain With No Name · An A List Apart Article

This rousing call-to-arms by Abby the IA makes a great companion piece to her interview on The Big Web Show.

Write What You Know (Now) · An A List Apart Column

Well, this is rather lovely!

I nodded along with host Jen Simmons and guest Jeremy Keith saying some very smart things about the web and its roots as the El train cut across Philadelphia. But at the 48-minute mark things got weird, because Jen and Jeremy basically started writing my column for me while I listened.

Read on for some great advice on conquering your inner critic.

From Pages to Patterns: An Exercise for Everyone · An A List Apart Article

I’m so proud of Charlotte right now: last week she gave a conference talk and today she has an article published in A List Apart. Superb work on both fronts!

She does a great job of talking through a collaborative exercise to help teams move from thinking in pages to thinking in patterns.

The Language of Modular Design · An A List Apart Article

Alla has taken the ideas she presented in her superb talk at Responsive Day Out and published them as a great article in A List Apart.

Mentorship for the Novice Expert · An A List Apart Column

Every single word that Lyza has written here speaks to me so, so much.

I have no idea what I’m doing and I’m nervous about messing up, but I keep doing this week after week because it feels important.

Get out of my head, Lyza!

Instant Web · An A List Apart Column

More thoughts on the lack of a performance culture, prompted by the existence of Facebook Instant:

In my experience, the biggest barrier to a high-performance web is this: the means of production are far removed from the means of delivery. It’s hard to feel the performance impact of your decisions when you’re sitting on a T3 line in front of a 30 inch monitor. And even if you test on real devices (as you should), you’re probably doing it on a fast wifi network, not a spotty 3G connection. For most of us, even the ones I would describe as pro-performance, everything in the contemporary web design production pipeline works against the very focus required to keep the web fast.

15 Years Ago in ALA: Much Ado About 5K · An A List Apart Blog Post

Zeldman looks back at Stewart Butterfield’s brilliant 5K contest. We need more of that kind of thinking today:

As one group of web makers embraces performance budgets and the eternal principles of progressive enhancement, while another (the majority) worships at the altar of bigger, fatter, slower, the 5K contest reminds us that a byte saved is a follower earned.

15 Years of Dao · An A List Apart Blog Post

On the fifteenth anniversary of A Dao Of Web Design people who make websites share their thoughts.

Paul Ford’s is a zinger:

I don’t know if the issues raised in “A Dao of Web Design” can ever be resolved, which is why the article seems so prescient. After all, the Tao Te Ching is 2500 years old and we’re still working out what it all means. What I do believe is that the web will remain the fastest path to experimenting with culture for people of any stripe. It will still be here, alive and kicking and deployed across billions of computing machines, in 2030, and people will still be using it to do weird, wholly unexpected things.

Let Links Be Links · An A List Apart Article

A superb piece by Ross Penman on the importance of being true to the spirit of the web.

Overwhelmed by Code · An A List Apart Blog Post

Focus on what you want to learn; not what you think you should learn.

There is a lot of pressure out there: to learn new things, to spend all your time coding, to be the super developer. I now believe that to be impossible and unhealthy. It means you aren’t living a balanced life and it also means that you’re living under constant stress and pressure.

Galaxy Zoo Quench

This is quite remarkable. Now that the Galaxy Zoo project from Zooniverse has successfully classified all its data (already a remarkable achievement), its volunteers are now collaborating on writing a scientific paper.

There’s something going on here. This isn’t just a “cool” or “cute” link—this is the first stirring of something entirely new that is made possible by network technology.