Tags: apis

65

sparkline

XML is 20

XML 1.0 was released on February 10th, 1998. I remember the hype around XML at the time—it was our saviour, the chosen one, prophesied to bring balance to data exchange. Things didn’t quite work out that way, but still…

Twenty years later, it seems obvious that the most important thing about XML is that it was the first. The first data format that anyone could pack anything up into, send across the network to anywhere, and unpack on the other end, without asking anyone’s permission or paying for software, or for the receiver to have to pay attention to what the producer thought they’d produced it for or what it meant.

The Power of Serverless

Chris has set up a whole site dedicated to someone-else’s-server sites with links to resources and services (APIs), along with ideas of what you could build in this way.

Here’s one way to think about it: you can take your front-end skills and do things that typically only a back-end can do. You can write a JavaScript function that you run and receive a response from by hitting a URL. That’s sometimes also called Cloud Functions or Functions as a Service, which are perhaps better names, but just a part of the whole serverless thing.

How To Make A Drag-and-Drop File Uploader With Vanilla JavaScript — Smashing Magazine

A step-by-step guide to implementing drag’n’drop, and image previews with the Filereader API. No libraries or frameworks were harmed in the making of this article.

Raindrops on roses, whiskers on kittens, declarative web APIs and truly serverless web endpoints

Three technologies that Ada is excited about:

  1. a service: IndieAuth,
  2. a front end library: Comlink,
  3. a pattern: APIs as Web Components.

Design in the Era of the Algorithm | Big Medium

The transcript of Josh’s fantastic talk on machine learning, voice, data, APIs, and all the other tools of algorithmic design:

The design and presentation of data is just as important as the underlying algorithm. Algorithmic interfaces are a huge part of our future, and getting their design right is critical—and very, very hard to do.

Josh put together ten design principles for conceiving, designing, and managing data-driven products. I’ve added them to my collection.

  1. Favor accuracy over speed
  2. Allow for ambiguity
  3. Add human judgment
  4. Advocate sunshine
  5. Embrace multiple systems
  6. Make it easy to contribute (accurate) data
  7. Root out bias and bad assumptions
  8. Give people control over their data
  9. Be loyal to the user
  10. Take responsibility

Service Worker Security FAQ - The Chromium Projects

Got questions about the security of service workers? This document probably has the answer.

Exciting times: 2017 and the web - Tales of a Developer Advocate by Paul Kinlan

Paul takes a look at the year ahead on the web and likes what he sees. There’s plenty of new browser features and APIs of course, but more interesting:

The web reaching more people as they come online with Mobile. There is still a huge amount of potential and growth in India, Indonesia, China, Thailand, Vietnam, all of Africa. You name it, mobile is growing massively still and the web is accessible on all of these devices.

Data on the Web Best Practices

This document provides Best Practices related to the publication and usage of data on the Web designed to help support a self-sustaining ecosystem. Data should be discoverable and understandable by humans and machines.

The (Not So) Secret Powers Of The Mobile Browser – Smashing Magazine

A run-down of all the functionality that you get in browsers these days. One small quibble with the title: most of the features and APIs described here aren’t limited to mobile browsers. Still, this is a great reminder that you probably don’t need to create a native app to get the most out of a mobile device.

Working with mobile technology - Digital Service Manual - GOV.UK

Excellent guidelines from GDS on providing services that work well on mobile. The watchwords are:

  • responsive design,
  • progressive enhancement,
  • open data, and
  • emerging technology (service workers, notifications, etc.).

Native and hybrid apps are rarely justified.

State of the gap

Remy looks at the closing gap between native and web. Things are looking pretty damn good for the web, with certain caveats:

The web is the long game. It will always make progress. Free access to both consumers and producers is a core principle. Security is also a core principle, and sometimes at the costs of ease to the developer (but if it were easy it wouldn’t be fun, right?).

That’s why there’ll always be some other technology that’s ahead of the web in terms of features, but those features give the web something to aim for:

Flash was the plugin that was ahead of the web for a long time, it was the only way to play video for heavens sake!

Whereas before we needed polyfills like PhoneGap (whose very reason for existing is to make itself obsolete), now with progressive web apps, we’re proving the philosophy behind PhoneGap:

If the web doesn’t do something today it’s not because it can’t, or won’t, but rather it is because we haven’t gotten around to implementing that capability yet.

simpl.info

This is a very handy resource—a collection of minimum viable implementations of HTML5 features and JavaScript APIs.

toddmotto/public-apis: A collective list of public JSON APIs for use in web development.

Remember mashups? Mashups were cool.

If you fancy partying like it’s nineteen ninety web 2.0, here’s a growing list of public APIs that return JSON.

Web Progressions

This looks a good (free!) event in London all about the latest browser goodies, all wrapped in the “progressive apps” buzzword.

Alas, I’ll be making my way back from Indie Web Camp Düsseldorf the day this is on.

Native or Not? The Untapped Power of Web Apps | Viget

Following on from that last link, here’s an in-depth run-down of what you can do in mobile browsers today. I think a lot of people internalised “what you can’t do on the web” a while back—it’s well worth periodically revisiting the feature landscape to revise that ever-shrinking list.

Perhaps the biggest advantage the web has over native apps is how quickly users are able to engage. All that’s between the user and your content is one click.

What Web Can Do Today

Visit this site using different browsers on different devices to get a feel for what you can do with web technologies.

Native will always be ahead, but the feature gap is closing impressively fast.

Laying The Groundwork For Extensibility—Smashing Coding

The authors of the Extensible Web Manifesto explain the thinking behind their …uh… thinking.

There’s a lot to like here, with some practical examples of where we’ve seen a disconnect between JavaScript APIs and declarative HTML (looking at you, Geolocation).

Lockdown – Marco.org

A superb piece by Marco Arment prompted by the closing of Google Reader. He nails the power of RSS:

RSS represents the antithesis of this new world: it’s completely open, decentralized, and owned by nobody, just like the web itself. It allows anyone, large or small, to build something new and disrupt anyone else they’d like because nobody has to fly six salespeople out first to work out a partnership with anyone else’s salespeople.

And he’s absolutely on the money when he describes what changed:

RSS, semantic markup, microformats, and open APIs all enable interoperability, but the big players don’t want that — they want to lock you in, shut out competitors, and make a service so proprietary that even if you could get your data out, it would be either useless (no alternatives to import into) or cripplingly lonely (empty social networks).

I share his anger.

Well, fuck them, and fuck that.

The State Of Responsive Web Design on Smashing Mobile

A comprehensive look at the current state of things in the world of responsive design, with a look to possible future APIs.

Exquisite Tweets from @genmon, @kellan, @anildash

I need to get Matt to an Indie Web Camp.