Tags: browser

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Meet the New Dialog Element

Move over, JavaScript alerts; HTML dialogs are here.

Improving URLs for AMP pages – Accelerated Mobile Pages Project

Good news! Google will graciously allow non-Google-hosted AMP pages to get the AMP blessing in search results.

Bad news! It requires publishers to package up their AMP pages in a new packaging format that browsers don’t support yet.

Careful Now | CSS-Tricks

Even more concerning than browser-specific websites is seeing browsers ship non-standardized features just because they want them, not behind any vendor prefix or flag. There was a time when web developers would have got out the pitchforks if a browser was doing this, but I sense some complacency seeping in.

A Sliding Nightmare: Understanding the Range Input | CSS-Tricks

Ana goes into exhaustive detail on all the differences in the shadow DOM and styling of input type="range" across browsers.

I’m totally fine with browsers providing different styling for complex UI elements like this, but I wish they’d at least provide a consistent internal structure and therefore a consistent way of over-riding the default styles. Maybe then people wouldn’t be so quick to abandon native elements like this in favour building their own UI components from scratch—the kind of over-engineering that inevitably ends up being under-engineered.

Introducing Web Payments: Easier Online Purchases With The Payment Request API — Smashing Magazine

A nice overview of the Payment Request API, which is getting more and more browser support.

A Browser You’ve Never Heard of Is Dethroning Google in Asia - WSJ

I’m always happy to see a thriving market of competition amongst browsers—we had a browser monopoly once before and it was a bad situation.

(That said, UC Browser has its own issues.)

Robust Client-Side JavaScript – A Developer’s Guide · molily

This is a terrific resource on writing client-side JavaScript without making too many assumptions.

It starts by covering some of the same topics as Resilient Web Design—fault tolerance, Postel’s law, progressive enhancement—but then goes deep, deep, deep into the specifics of applying that to JavaScript.

And the whole thing is available here for free under a Creative Commons licence!

Why Web Developers Need to Care about Interactivity — Philip Walton

Just to be clear, this isn’t about interaction design, it’s about how browsers and become unresponsive to interaction when they’re trying to parse the truckloads of Javascript web developers throw at them.

Top tip: lay off the JavaScript. HTML is interactive instantly.

The Trials and Tribulations of the Title Attribute - 24 Accessibility

Everything you ever wanted to know about the title attribute in HTML.

What’s hot: using title on inputs, abbrs, and iframes.

What’s not: using title on anything else.

Chrome is Not the Standard · Chris Krycho

The fact that Chrome proposes something, and even the fact that a bunch of developers like it, does not a standard make. Nor does it impose an obligation to other browsers to prioritize it, or even to ship it.

Extended Validation is Broken

How a certificate with extended validation makes it easier to phish. But I think the title could be amended—here’s what’s really broken:

On Safari, the URL is completely hidden! This means the attacker does not even need to register a convincing phishing domain. They can register anything, and Safari will happily cover it with a nice green bar.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 46 | WebKit

Well, that escalated quickly! Service workers are now available in Safari’s Technology Preview, which means it won’t be long before it lands in Safari proper.

Also: service workers also just landed in the insider release of Edge.

Everything offline’s coming up Milhouse!

Mozilla betrays Firefox users and its nominal principles

That’s a harsh headline but it is unfortunately deserved. We should indeed hold Mozilla to a higher standard.

Cascading Web Design with Feature Queries ◆ 24 ways

24 Ways is back! Yay! This year’s edition kicks off with a great article by Hui Jing on using @supports:

Chances are, the latest features will not ship across all browsers at the same time. But you know what? That’s perfectly fine. If we accept this as a feature of the web, instead of a bug, we’ve just opened up a lot more web design possibilities.

Accessible custom styled form elements - Rian Rietveld

An excellent level-headed evaluation of styling and scripting form controls, weighing up the benefits and trade-offs. The more tightly you control the appearance, the less you get to benefit from the functionality (and accessibility) that the browser gives you for free …meaning you’ve now to got to work harder to replace it.

HTML elements like check buttons, radio buttons or select options can be hard to style with CSS in a custom design. There are many workarounds for this, but are they accessible?

The Story of CSS Grid, from Its Creators · An A List Apart Article

It must be the day for documenting the history of CSS. Here’s an article by Aaron on the extraordinary success story of CSS Grid. A lot of the credit for that quite rightly goes to Rachel and Jen:

Starting with Rachel Andrew coming in and creating a ton of demos and excitement around CSS Grid with Grid by Example and starting to really champion it and show it to web developers and what it was capable of and the problems that it solves.

Then, a little bit later, Jen Simmons created something called Labs where she put a lot of demos that she created for CSS Grid up on the web and, again, continued that momentum and that wave of enthusiasm for CSS Grid with web developers in the community.

A Look Back at the History of CSS | CSS-Tricks

The evolution of CSS, as told by the author of the excellent History of the Web newsletter.

Microsoft Edge for iOS and Android: What developers need to know - Microsoft Edge Dev Blog

This is such a strange announcement from Microsoft. It’s worded as though they chose to use the WebKit engine on iOS. But there is no choice: if you want to put a browser on iOS, you must use the WKWebView control. Apple won’t allow any other rendering engine (that’s why Chrome on iOS is basically a skin for Safari; same for Opera on iOS). It’s a disgraceful monopolistic policy on Apple’s part.

A word to the Microsoft marketing department: please don’t try to polish the turd in the shit sandwich you’ve been handed by Apple.

“async” attribute on img, and corresponding “ready” event · Issue #1920 · whatwg/html

It looks like the async attribute is going to ship in Chrome for img elements:

This attribute would have two states:

  • “on”: This indicates that the developer prefers responsiveness and performance over atomic presentation of content.
  • “off”: This indicates that the developer prefers atomic presentation of content over responsiveness.

Web Components: The Long Game – Infrequently Noted

One of the things we’d hoped to enable via Web Components was a return to ctrl-r web development. At some level of complexity and scale we all need tools to help cope with code size, application structure, and more. But the tender, loving maintainance of babel and webpack and NPM configurations that represents a huge part of “front end development” today seems…punitive. None of this should be necessary when developing one (or a few) components and composing things shouldn’t be this hard. The sophistication of the tools needs to get back to being proportional with the complexity of the problem at hand.

I completely agree with Alex here. But that’s also why I was surprised and disheartened when I linked to Monica’s excellent introduction to web components that a package manager seemed to be a minimum requirement.