Tags: browser

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The Story of CSS Grid, from Its Creators · An A List Apart Article

It must be the day for documenting the history of CSS. Here’s an article by Aaron on the extraordinary success story of CSS Grid. A lot of the credit for that quite rightly goes to Rachel and Jen:

Starting with Rachel Andrew coming in and creating a ton of demos and excitement around CSS Grid with Grid by Example and starting to really champion it and show it to web developers and what it was capable of and the problems that it solves.

Then, a little bit later, Jen Simmons created something called Labs where she put a lot of demos that she created for CSS Grid up on the web and, again, continued that momentum and that wave of enthusiasm for CSS Grid with web developers in the community.

A Look Back at the History of CSS | CSS-Tricks

The evolution of CSS, as told by the author of the excellent History of the Web newsletter.

Microsoft Edge for iOS and Android: What developers need to know - Microsoft Edge Dev Blog

This is such a strange announcement from Microsoft. It’s worded as though they chose to use the WebKit engine on iOS. But there is no choice: if you want to put a browser on iOS, you must use the WKWebView control. Apple won’t allow any other rendering engine (that’s why Chrome on iOS is basically a skin for Safari; same for Opera on iOS). It’s a disgraceful monopolistic policy on Apple’s part.

A word to the Microsoft marketing department: please don’t try to polish the turd in the shit sandwich you’ve been handed by Apple.

“async” attribute on img, and corresponding “ready” event · Issue #1920 · whatwg/html

It looks like the async attribute is going to ship in Chrome for img elements:

This attribute would have two states:

  • “on”: This indicates that the developer prefers responsiveness and performance over atomic presentation of content.
  • “off”: This indicates that the developer prefers atomic presentation of content over responsiveness.

Web Components: The Long Game – Infrequently Noted

One of the things we’d hoped to enable via Web Components was a return to ctrl-r web development. At some level of complexity and scale we all need tools to help cope with code size, application structure, and more. But the tender, loving maintainance of babel and webpack and NPM configurations that represents a huge part of “front end development” today seems…punitive. None of this should be necessary when developing one (or a few) components and composing things shouldn’t be this hard. The sophistication of the tools needs to get back to being proportional with the complexity of the problem at hand.

I completely agree with Alex here. But that’s also why I was surprised and disheartened when I linked to Monica’s excellent introduction to web components that a package manager seemed to be a minimum requirement.

5 things CSS developers wish they knew before they started | CSS-Tricks

  1. Don’t underestimate CSS
  2. Share and participate
  3. Pick the right tools
  4. Get to know the browser
  5. Learn to write maintainable CSS

jakearchibald/navigation-transitions

I honestly think if browsers implemented this, 80% of client-rendered Single Page Apps could be done as regular good ol’-fashioned websites.

Having to reimplement navigation for a simple transition is a bit much, often leading developers to use large frameworks where they could otherwise be avoided. This proposal provides a low-level way to create transitions while maintaining regular browser navigation.

Designing Websites for iPhone X | WebKit

This could be a one-word article: don’t.

More specifically, don’t design websites for any specific device. That way lies pain (and it is not the way of the web).

But read on for a textbook example of how not to introduce new CSS properties. Apple proposed the new syntax that they’re shipping. Now it’s getting standardised …with a different name. So basically Apple are shipping the equivalent of a vendor-prefixed property without the vendor prefix.

CloseBrace | A Brief, Incomplete History of JavaScript

Another deep dive into web history, this time on JavaScript. The timeline of JS on the web is retroactively broken down into four eras:

  • the early era: ~1996 – 2004,
  • the jQuery era: ~2004 – 2010,
  • the Single Page App era: ~2010 - 2014, and
  • the modern era: ~2014 - present.

Nice to see “vanilla” JavaScript making a resurgence in that last one.

It’s 2017, the JavaScript ecosystem is both thriving and confusing as all hell. No one seems to be quite sure where it’s headed, only that it’s going to continue to grow and change. The web’s not going anywhere, which means JS isn’t going anywhere, and I’m excited to see what future eras bring us.

The First Web Apps: 5 Apps That Shaped the Internet as We Know It

A great bit of web history spelunking in search of the first websites that allowed users to interact with data on a server. Applications, if you will. It’s well written, but I take issue with this:

The world wide web wasn’t supposed to be this fun. Berners-Lee imagined the internet as a place to collaborate around text, somewhere to share research data and thesis papers.

This often gets trotted out (“the web was intended for scientists sharing documents”), but it’s simply not true that Tim Berners-Lee was only thinking of his immediate use-case; he deliberately made the WWW project broad enough to allow all sorts of thitherto unforeseen uses. If he hadn’t …well, the web wouldn’t have been able to accommodate all those later developments. It’s not an accident that the web was later used for all sorts of unexpected things—that was the whole idea.

Anyway, apart from that misstep, the rest of the article is a fun piece, well worth reading.

Fix Twitter by Jonathan Suh

Make Twitter Great Again:

Fix Twitter is a browser extension to always show “replying to” in replies and threads along with an option to restore the old-school @-mentions.

Chrome to force .dev domains to HTTPS via preloaded HSTS

Well, I guess it’s time to change all my locally-hosted sites from .dev domains to .test. Thanks, Google.

Mozilla Developer Roadshow - Singapore - YouTube

I had the honour of being invited along to kick off the first leg of Mozilla’s Developer Roadshow in Singapore.

Deploying ES2015+ Code in Production Today — Philip Walton

The reality is transpiling and including polyfills is quickly becoming the new norm. What’s unfortunate is this means billions of users are getting trillions of bytes sent over the wire unnecessarily to browsers that would have been perfectly capable of running the untranspiled code natively.

Phil has a solution: serve up your modern JavaScript using script type="module" and put your transpiled fallback in script nomodule.

Most developers think of <script type="module"> as way to load ES modules (and of course this is true), but <script type="module"> also has a more immediate and practical use-case—loading regular JavaScript files with ES2015+ features and knowing the browser can handle it!

Compilers are the New Frameworks - tomdale.net

If you’re interested in predicting the future of the web, just look at what high-performance native systems look like, then figure out how we can apply those ideas in the browser.

I like that Tom encourages learning from native, but not at the expense of the web (hint, hint, Google devrels encouraging slavish imitation of native apps in progressive web apps with no regard for URLs).

Our job now is figuring out how to adapt the ideas of high-performance native code while preserving what makes the web great: URLs, instant loading, and a security model that allows us to forget that we run thousands and thousands of untrusted scripts every day.

Malte Ubl on Twitter: “🙏🏿 to @sebabenz for testing that this isn’t an AMP special case. Safari now defaults to sharing the canonical URL 👏🏾

If Safari is updating its “share” functionality to look for canonical URLs, then that should work not just for AMP pages, but also Medium posts that include a canonical URL (like the ones created by posting to the Medium API, which is what I’m doing).

Inside a super fast CSS engine: Quantum CSS (aka Stylo) ★ Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog

Lin gives a deep dive into Firefox’s new CSS engine specifically, but this is also an excellent primer on how browsers handle CSS in general: parsing, styling, layout, painting, compositing, and rendering.

Attachment #317095 for bug #175115

I’ve never been so excited by a single diff in a JSON file.

Service workers are coming to Safari.

The Critical Request | CSS-Tricks

Ben takes us on a journey inside the mind of a browser (Chrome in this case). It’s all about priorities when it comes to the critical path.

Flash is in the pan

Cameron counts the ways in which Flash was like a polyfill.

Yeah, that’s right: The Man In Blue is back!