Tags: browsers

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Eric’s Archived Thoughts: CSS Grid!

Eric is excited about the imminent arrival of grid layout in browsers. And after reading the answers to these sure-to-be-frequently asked questions, you’ll be excited too!

Browsers, not apps, are the future of mobile - Inside Intercom

I wrote a while back:

There’s a whole category of native apps that could just as easily be described as “artisanal web browsers” (and if someone wants to write a browser extension that replaces every mention of “native app” with “artisanal web browser” that would be just peachy).

Here’s some more thoughts along the same lines:

We’re spending increasing amounts of time inside messaging apps and social networks, themselves wrappers for the mobile web. They’re actually browsers.

There’s an important take-away to this:

The web is and will always be the most popular mobile operating system in the world – not iOS or Android. It’s important that the next generation of software companies don’t focus exclusively on building native iOS or Android versions of existing web apps.

Just make sure those web apps render and work well in the new wave of mobile browsers – messengers. Don’t build for iOS or Android just for an imaginary distribution opportunity. Distribution exists where people spend most of their time today – social and messaging apps, the new mobile browser for a bot-enabled world.

Service Worker, what are you? - Mariko Kosaka

This is a fun—and accurate—explanation of service workers.

There’s definitely something “alien” about a service worker—it’s kind of like a virus that gets installed on the user’s device. I’ve taken to describing it as “a man-in-the-middle attack on your own website” which makes sound a bit scarier than is necessary.

kdzwinel/progress-bar-animation: Making a Doughnut Progress Bar - research notes

This is a thorough write-up of an interesting case where SVG looks like the right tool for the job, but further research leads to some sad-making conclusions.

I love SVG. It’s elegant, scalable and works everywhere. It’s perfect for mobile… as long as it doesn’t move. There is no way to animate it smoothly on Android.

Mutating the active element - ally.js

Rodney has done some great research into how different browsers respond to a focusable element becoming inactive (by being made disabled, hidden, or removed).

Oversharing with the browser’s autofill / Stoyan’s phpied.com

Equal parts clever and scary. By using autocomplete in HTML and some offscreen positioning in CSS, it’s possible to extract some unexpected personal information.

I expect browsers will be closing these holes pretty quickly.

The Web is not Fashionable. - The blog of Ada Rose Edwards

This is such a great perspective on what it’s like to build for the web over the long term. The web will always be a little bit broken, and that’s okay—we can plan for that.

The Web has history. If you build with web technology it will stick around. We try not to break the web even if it means the mistakes and bad decisions we have made in the past (and will make in the future) get set in stone.

Why we are suing Apple for better HTML5 support in iOS?

Finally! Apple are being sued for refusing to allow any non-Webkit browsers to be installed on iOS.

I’m not usually in favour of legal action but in this case, there doesn’t seem to be any other recourse.

We would be delighted at Nexedi to create a Web browser for iOS with better HTML5 support based on a recent version of Blink library for example. But as soon as we would publish it, it would be banned from Apple’s AppStore. Many developers have experienced this situation already. Many companies are being hurt by this situation. Some companies have already begged Apple to improve HTML5 support in iOS with little significant results.

How to prototype in the browser | GDS design notes

This is a clever quick’n’dirty way of prototyping iterations on an existing site using dev tools and screenshots.

Normalize (CSS) No More. | shaunrashid.com

This crystallises something I’ve been thinking about for a while. There’s a fundamental philosophical idea underpinning CSS reset or normalise boilerplate that feels at odds with the belief that it’s perfectly fine for websites to look different in different browsers and devices.

GreenSock | “will-change” must change? Animators beware.

This will-change property that was intended to SOLVE problems for animators may end up doing the opposite.

It seems wise for the browsers to step back and let the spec authors fill in the implementation details and gain consensus before moving forward.

Intervening against document.write() | Web Updates - Google Developers

Chrome is going to refuse to parse document.write for users on a slow connection. On the one hand, I feel that Google intervening in this way is a bit icky, but I on the other hand, I totally support this move.

This keeps happening. Google announce a change (usually related to search) where I think “Ooh, that could be interpreted as an abuse of a monopoly position …but it’s for ver good reason so I’ll keep quiet.”

Anyway, this should serve as a good kick in the pants for bad actors (that’s you, advertisers) to update their scripts to be asynchronous.

Web Platform Feature Availability

Here’s a handy graph from Paul:

Powered by data from caniuse.com and StatCounter, this page indicates the percentage of users who have a browser that natively supports various web platform features.

Web development as a hack of hacks - QuirksBlog

PPK reads a Hacker News thread so you don’t have to.

The Typekit Blog | Variable fonts, a new kind of font for flexible design

This is what Nick Sherman has been banging on about for years, and now the time has come for variable fonts …as long as typographers, browser makers, and standards bodies get behind it.

More details on Ev’s blog.

What, Exactly, Makes Something A Progressive Web App? | Infrequently Noted

Alex runs through the features that a progressive web app must have, should have, and would be nice to have.

In general, installability criteria are tightening. Today’s Good-To-Haves may become part of tomorrow’s baseline. The opposite is unlikely because at least one major browser has made a strong commitment to tightening up the rules for installability.

Right now, this is in the nice-to-have category:

Mobile-friendly, not mobile-only.

Personally, I’d put that in the must-have category, and not just for progressive web apps.

Anyway, read on for some advice on testing and tooling when it comes to evaluating progressive web apps.

How Google And Others Are Plotting The Revenge Of The Web App | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

It’s always, um …”interesting” when a mainstream publication covers a topic from the web’s bikeshed. In this case, it’s progressive web apps, and—apart from the sensationalist headline—it’s actually not that bad at all.

Using Feature Queries in CSS ★ Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog

A thorough explanation of @supports from Jen, with plenty of smart strategies for using it in your CSS today.

Download Blisk - a browser for web developers

A browser aimed specifically at web developers. It’s got some nice features around mobile device emulation.