Tags: car

163

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Shipmap.org | Visualisation of Global Cargo Ships | By Kiln and UCL

A beautiful visualisation of shipping routes and cargo. Mesmerising!

You can see movements of the global merchant fleet over the course of 2012, overlaid on a bathymetric map. You can also see a few statistics such as a counter for emitted CO2 (in thousand tonnes) and maximum freight carried by represented vessels (varying units).

Leaving Clearleft – Jon Aizlewood

Following on from Ben’s post, this is also giving me the warm fuzzies.

I, in no uncertain terms, have become a better designer thanks to the people I’ve had the pleasure of working alongside at Clearleft. I’ll forever be thankful of my time there, and to the people who helped me become better.

So long, and thanks for all the beer. – Ben Sauer

Ben is moving on from Clearleft. I’m going to miss him. I found this summation of his time here very moving.

Working at Clearleft was one of the best decisions I ever made. 6 years of some work that I’m most proud of, amongst some of the finest thinkers I’ve ever met.

He also outlines the lessons he learned here:

  • Writing and speaking will make you a better thinker and designer.
  • Autonomy rules.
  • Own stuff.
  • Aim high.

Should you ever choose to work with, or work for Clearleft, I hope these words will give you some encouragement — it is an exceptional place to be.

Carbon

This service could be quite handy if you’re making a presentation that involves showing code—it generates syntax-highlighted images of code.

Campaign. — Ethan Marcotte

Ethan is understandably dubious about Google’s recent announcement regarding the relaxation of the AMP’s iron fist.

Because it’s great to hear the AMP team make some overtures toward a more open web—and personally, I’d like to thank them sincerely for doing so. But if we’re swapping one set of Google-owned criteria for another set of slightly more permissive Google-owned criteria, I’m not sure how much will have changed.

Standardizing lessons learned from AMP – Accelerated Mobile Pages Project

This is very good news indeed—Google are going to allow non-AMP pages to get the same prioritised treatment as AMP pages …if they comply with the kind of performance criteria that Tim outlined.

It’ll take time to get there, but I’m so, so glad to see that Google aren’t going to try to force everyone to use their own proprietary format.

We are taking what we learned from AMP, and are working on web standards that will allow instant loading for non-AMP web content. We hope this work will also unlock AMP-like embeddability that powers Google Search features like the Top Stories carousel.

I just hope that this alternate route to the carousel won’t get lumped under the banner of “AMP”—that term has been pretty much poisoned at this point.

Winning on Mobile

This looks like a handy tool for doing some quick’n’dirty competitor analysis when it comes to performance: create a scoreboard of sites to rank by speed (and calculate the potential revenue impact).

Many factors contribute to an engaging mobile experience. And speed is chief among them. Most people will abandon a mobile site visit if the page takes more than a few seconds to load. Use our Speed Scorecard to see how your site stacks up to the competition.

Moving Slowly and Fixing Things / Paul Robert Lloyd

Although design gets conflated with creation, its the act of improving what already exists — organising a room, editing a text, refining an interface, refactoring a codebase — that I enjoy the most.

Subverted Design

It’s ironic, isn’t it? Design is more important and respected than ever, which means we have more agency to affect change. But at the same time, our priorities have been subverted, pushed towards corporate benefit over human benefit. It’s hard to reconcile those things.

Explore Georeferenced Maps - Spy viewer - National Library of Scotland

This is a fascinating way to explore time and place—a spyglass view of hundred year old maps overlaid on the digital maps of today.

Google Maps’s Moat

A fascinating bit of cartographic reverse engineering, looking at how Google has an incredible level of satellite-delivered building detail that then goes into solving the design problem of marking “commercial corridors” (or Areas Of Interest) on their maps.

Google Maps in Space

You can use Google Maps to explore the worlds of our solar system …and take a look inside the ISS.

A Content Slider

Brad always said that carousels were way to stop people beating each other up in meetings. I like the way Heydon puts it:

Carousels (or ‘content sliders’) are like men. They are not literally all bad — some are even helpful and considerate. But I don’t trust anyone unwilling to acknowledge a glaring pattern of awfulness. Also like men, I appreciate that many of you would rather just avoid dealing with carousels, but often don’t have the choice. Hence this article.

The Freedom to Associate » The Digital Antiquarian

A history of hypertext, from the memex to HyperCard.

Failing to distinguish between a tractor trailer and the bright white sky | booktwo.org

James talks about automation and understanding.

Just because a technology – whether it’s autonomous vehicles, satellite communications, or the internet – has been captured by capital and turned against the populace, doesn’t mean it does not retain a seed of utopian possibility.

So You Want To Be a Senior Developer? | CSS-Tricks

I like Chris’s list of criteria for the nebulous role of senior developer:

  • A senior front end developer has experience.
  • A senior front-end developer has a track record of good judgment.
  • A senior developer has positive impact beyond the code.
  • A senior developer is helpful, not all-knowing.
  • A senior front-end developer is a force multiplier.

Introducing the Made by Many professional development programme – Made by Many

This resonates a lot—we’ve been working on something similar at Clearleft, for very similar reasons:

We rode the folk knowledge train until it became clear that it was totally unscaleable and we struggled to effectively commute know-how to the incoming brains.

At Made By Many, they’ve sliced it into three categories: Design, Technology, and Product Management & Strategy. At Clearleft, we’re trying to create a skills matrix for each of these disciplines: UX, UI, Dev, Research, Content Strategy, and Project Management. I’m working on the Dev matrix. I’ll share it once we’ve hammered it into something presentable. In the meantime, it’s good to see exactly the same drivers are at work at Made By Many:

The levels give people a scaffold onto which they can project their personalised career path, reflecting their progression, and facilitating professional development at every stage.

Microformats : Meaningful HTML

A great one-page intro to microformats (h-card in particular), complete with a parser that exports JSON. Bookmark this for future reference.

Improve Your Billing Form’s UX In One Day – Smashing Magazine

A few straightforward steps for improving the usability of credit card forms. The later steps involve JavaScript but the first step uses nothing more than straight-up HTML.