Tags: design



Simple, semantic and responsive tables (part II) – Design Today – Wouter Hillen

This uses generated content in CSS to make the aria-label attributes visible on small screens—clever!

Overview | Atlassian Design Guidelines

A nicely-documented styleguide from Atlassian. It’s not a component library, though—there’s no code here.

How the Web Became Unreadable

Kevin writes a plea on Ev’s blog for better contrast in web typography:

When you build a site and ignore what happens afterwards — when the values entered in code are translated into brightness and contrast depending on the settings of a physical screen — you’re avoiding the experience that you create. And when you design in perfect settings, with big, contrast-rich monitors, you blind yourself to users. To arbitrarily throw away contrast based on a fashion that “looks good on my perfect screen in my perfectly lit office” is abdicating designers’ responsibilities to the very people for whom they are designing.

Addicted to Your iPhone? You’re Not Alone - The Atlantic

The dreadful headline makes this sound like another pearl-clutching moral panic, but there’s some good stuff in this somewhat hagiographic profile.

Harris is developing a code of conduct—the Hippocratic oath for software designers—and a playbook of best practices that can guide start-ups and corporations toward products that “treat people with respect.” Having companies rethink the metrics by which they measure success would be a start.

First Time User Experiences

Krystal’s excellent annotated collection of onboarding examples.

How to prototype in the browser | GDS design notes

This is a clever quick’n’dirty way of prototyping iterations on an existing site using dev tools and screenshots.

Fantasy UIs

Interviews with the designers who make on-screen interfaces for sci-fi films.

Magic randomisation with nth-child and Cicada Principle | Charlotte Jackson, Front-end developer

Here’s the really clever technique that Charlotte used on the speakers page for this year’s UX London site.

I remember that Jon was really impressed that she managed to implement his crazy design.

Grid layout is a much needed step-change for CSS | Matt Hinchliffe, Front-End Developer

This is not only a really good explanation of CSS grid layout, it’s also a practical walkthrough, recreating the layout of the Financial Times. I think if I followed along at home, writing the markup and CSS outlined here, it would me to get this stuff “clicking” in my brain.

6 web layout myths busted | Creative Bloq

Jen tackles six aspects of web design that were true …but no longer.

  1. Everything must be a floating bar of soap
  2. Rectangles; only rectangles
  3. We can’t control the fold
  4. 12 columns is best
  5. We have to use a layout framework
  6. We are stuck in a rut because of RWD

Golden Ratio Bot (@goldenratiobot) | Twitter

My new favourite Twitter account.

Proposal to CSSWG, Sept 2016 // Speaker Deck

Jen has some ideas for a new CSS Region spec to turbo-boost Grid. I’m still trying to wrap my head around it, but in the meantime, if you have feedback on this, please let her know.

CSS Mega Dropdown | CodyHouse

I’m no fan of mega menus, and if a site were being designed from scratch, I’d do everything I could to avoid them, but on some existing projects they’re an unavoidable necessity (the design equivalent of technical debt). In those situations, this looks like a really nice, responsive approach.

Webfonts on the Prairie · An A List Apart Article

A good ol’ polemic in favour of using web fonts. It’s a good read although I strongly disagree with this line of reasoning:

The average internet speed in the United States today is three times as fast as it was in 2011.

But that americentric view is redeemed later on:

The World Wide Web may be a creation of the West, but now, at long last, it needs to get ready for the rest.

I may not agree with all the points in this article, but I think we can all agree that if we’re going to use web fonts, we must use them responsibly …otherwise users are going to treat them as damage and route around them.

`font-display` for the Masses | CSS-Tricks

The font-display property is landing in browsers, and this is a great introduction to using it:

If you don’t know which option to use, then go with swap. Not only does it provide an optimal balance between custom fonts and accessibility of content, it provides the same font loading behavior that we’ve relied on JavaScript for. If you have fonts on the page that you’d like to have load, but could ultimately do without, consider going with fallback or optional when using font-display.

Until it’s more widely supported, you can continue to use a JavaScript solution, but even then you can feature detect first:

if ("fontDisplay" in document.body.style === false) {
  /* JavaScript font loading logic goes here. */

The web is not print and other stories

Rachel takes a look back at twenty years of building on the web. Her conclusion: we’ve internalised constraints that are no longer relevant, and that’s holding us back from exploring new design possibilities:

Somehow the tables have turned. As the web moves on, as we get CSS that gives us the ability to implement designs impossible a few years ago, the web looks more and more like something we could have build with rudimentary CSS for layout. We’ve settled on our constraints and we are staying there, defined by not being print.

Indicating offline | justmarkup

Some interesting interface ideas here for informing users when a service worker is doing its magic.

In the future users may expect a site to work offline after visiting again, but until this happens, I think it is a good idea to let the users know about this feature.

Mozilla Open Design – branding without walls

Mozilla are updating their brand identity and they’re doing it in the open. A brave, but fascinating move.

Writing Less Damn Code | HeydonWorks

I’m in complete agreement with Heydon here:

But it turns out the only surefire way to make performant Web Stuff is also to just write less. Minify? Okay. Compress? Well, yeah. Cache? Sounds technical. Flat out refuse to code something or include someone else’s code in the first place? Now you’re talking.

Just like the “mobile first” mindset, if you demand that everything must justify its existence, you end up with a better experience for everyone:

My favorite thing about aiming to have less stuff is this: you finish up with only the stuff you really need — only the stuff your user actually wants. Massive hero image of some dude drinking a latte? Lose it. Social media buttons which pull in a bunch of third-party code while simultaneously wrecking your page design? Give them the boot. That JavaScript thingy that hijacks the user’s right mouse button to reveal a custom modal? Ice moon prison.