Tags: development

1000

sparkline

Learn CSS Grid - A Guide to Learning CSS Grid | Jonathan Suh

A quick visual guide to CSS Grid properties and values.

Service Worker Security FAQ - The Chromium Projects

Got questions about the security of service workers? This document probably has the answer.

Evaluating Technology – Jeremy Keith – btconfDUS2017 on Vimeo

I wasn’t supposed to speak at this year’s Beyond Tellerrand conference, but alas, Ellen wasn’t able to make it so I stepped in and gave my talk on evaluating technology.

Are we making the web too complicated? | Seldo.Com Blog

Laurie Voss on the trade-off between new powerful web dev tools, and the messiness that abusing those tools can bring:

Is modern web development fearsomely, intimidatingly complicated? Yes, and that’s a problem. Will we make it simpler? Definitely, but probably not as soon as you’d like. Is all this new complexity worthwhile? Absolutely.

I agree that there’s bound to be inappropriate use of technologies, but I don’t agree that we should just accept it:

Are there some people using a huge pile of JavaScript and a monstrous build chain to throw together a single-pager web site with one box that collects an email address? For sure. And that’s silly and unnecessary. But so what? The misuse of technology does not invalidate it.

I think we can raise our standards. Inappropriate use of technology might have been forgivable ten years ago, but if we want web development to be taken seriously as a discipline, I think we should endeavour to use our tools and technologies appropriately.

But we can all agree that the web is a wonderful thing:

Nobody but nobody loves the web more than I do. It’s my baby. And like a child, it’s frustrating to watch it struggle and make mistakes. But it’s amazing to watch it grow up.

Presentation: Accessibility in a Responsive World, A11Y Days 2017

There are some great hands-on accessibility patterns in this talk transcript from Scott.

Style Guide Guide | Style Guide Guide

If you want to understand the thinking behind this style guide guide, be sure to read Brad’s style guide guide guide.

Mavo: A new, approachable way to create Web applications

A really interesting new project from Lea that aims to put dynamic sites within the reach of everyone. The emphasis is on declarative languages—HTML and CSS—no JavaScript knowledge required.

Lea has also written an introductory article on Smashing Mag.

Why Fast Matters // Speaker Deck

Slides from Harry’s recent talk on performance.

ngrok - secure introspectable tunnels to localhost

This looks like a useful tool, not just for testing locally-hosted sites (say, at a device lab), but also for making locally-hosted sites run on HTTPS so you can test service workers.

Going offline. — Ethan Marcotte

Ethan has added a service worker to his site and he’s got a nifty little recipe for showing a list of saved-for-offline articles.

Offline Web Applications | Udacity

This is a free online video course recorded by Jake a couple of years back. It’s got a really good step-by-step introduction to service workers, delivered in Jake’s typically witty way. Some of the details are a bit out of date, and I must admit that I bailed when it got to IndexedDB, but I highly recommend giving this a go.

There’s also a free course on web accessibility I’m planning to check out.

Springer Nature frontend playbook: house style guide

I like it when organisations share their in-house coding styles. This one from Springer Nature not only has guides for HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, but it also has a good primer on progressive enhancement.

Sessions by Pusher

Oodles and oodles of videos of talks from London developer meetups.

A Case for Progressive Web Applications in 2017

If your company is or is planning on doing business in emerging markets, architecting your web applications for performance through progressive enhancements is one easy way to drastically improve accessibility, retention, and user experience.

This article uses “progressive enhancement” and “progressive web app” interchangeably, which would be true in an ideal world. This is the first of a three part series, and it sounds like it will indeed document how to take an existing site and enhance it into a progressive web app—a strategy I much prefer to creating a separate silo that only works for a subset of devices (the app-shell model being pushed by Google).

Introducing Fractal and Federalist | U.S. Web Design Standards

Another instance of Fractal in the wild, this time for the Federalist design system.

Why Fractal?

  • It’s open source.
  • It’s easy to use.
  • It generates standalone HTML previews of each component.
  • It uses or supports many of the technologies we use already.
  • Fractal offers a customizable theme engine.

Using NPM as a Build Tool | gablaxian.com

For a small to medium sized project, this sounds like a sensible way to approach build tasks. It feels nice and close to the metal.

Device intervention. — Ethan Marcotte

But here’s the thing about browsing the modern web with a six year-old laptop: nearly every browser tab causes my fan to spin, and my laptop to warm. Elements of web pages slowly, noticeably, gracelessly ka-chunk-fall into place as they render. While I browse the web, I feel each one of my laptop’s six years.

SpeedTracker

This is a great free service for doing a bit of performance monitoring on your site. It uses WebPageTest and you do all the set up via a Github repo that then displays the results using Github Pages.

It won’t give you the power or control of Calibre but it’s a handy option for smaller sites. Here are the results for adactio.com running on a Moto G over 3G.

Obrigado, Eduardo!

Painting with Code : Airbnb Design

Very clever stuff here from Jon in the tradition of Bret Victor—alter Sketch files by directly manipulating code (React, in this case).

I’m not sure the particular use-case outlined here is going to apply much outside of AirBnB (just because the direction of code-to-Sketch feels inverted from most processes) but the underlying idea of treating visual design assets and code as two manifestations of the same process …that’s very powerful.

There are maps for these territories | Clearleft

A great piece from Danielle on the different mental models needed for different languages. When someone describes a language—like CSS—as “broken”, it may well be that there’s a mismatch in mental models.

CSS isn’t a programming language. It’s a stylesheet language. We shouldn’t expect it to behave like a programming language. It has its own unique landscape and structures, ones that people with programming language mental maps might not expect.

I believe that this mismatch of expectation is what has led to the current explosion of CSS-in-JS solutions. Confronted with a language that seems arbitrary and illogical, and having spent little or no time exposed to the landscape, developers dismiss CSS as ‘broken’ and use systems that either sweep it under the rug, or attempt to force it into alignment with the landscape of a programming language — often sacrificing some of the most powerful features of CSS.