Tags: development

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User agent as a runtime | Blog | Decade City

Ultimately you can’t control when and how things go wrong but you do have some control over what happens. This is why progressive enhancement exists.

My biggest challenge with JavaScript | Go Make Things

This really, really resonates with me:

I think the thing I struggle the most with right now is determining when something new is going to change the way our industry works for the better (like responsive web design did 5 or 6 years ago), and when it’s just a fad that will fade away in a year or three (which is how I feel about our obsession with things like Angular and React).

I try to avoid jumping from fad to fad, but I also don’t want to be that old guy who misses out on something that’s an important leap forward for us. I spend a lot of time thinking about the longer term impact of the things we make (and make with).

Your Brain on Front-End Development | CSS-Tricks

I find this soooo relatable:

I know when I look at a design (heck, even if I know I’m not going to be building it), my front-end brain starts triggering all sorts of things I know will be related to the task.

Difference is, Chris comes up with some very, very clever techniques.

Resilient, Declarative, Contextual

This is really good breakdown of what’s different about CSS (compared to other languages).

These differences may feel foreign, but it’s these differences that make CSS so powerful. And it’s my suspicion that developers who embrace these things, and have fully internalized them, tend to be far more proficient in CSS.

Designing Web Content for watchOS - WWDC 2018 - Videos - Apple Developer

If you don’t fancy watching this video, Eric Runyon has written down the salient points about what it means for developers now that websites can be viewed on the Apple Watch. Basically, as long as you’re writing good, meaningful markup and you’ve got a sensible font stack, you’re all set.

Or, as Tim puts it:

When we build our sites in a way that allows people using less-capable devices, slower networks and other less than ideal circumstances, we end up better prepared for whatever crazy device or technology comes along next.

Text Effects - a Collection by Mandy Michael on CodePen

Mandy’s experiments with text effects in CSS are kinda mindblowing—I can’t wait to see her at Ampersand at the end of the month!

Fostering a Web Performance Culture - José M. Pérez

Six steps to kickstart a web performance culture:

  1. Your dev environment is not your user’s environment
  2. It’s better to learn the fundamentals than the library
  3. Get the time to experiment and validate
  4. Educate your colleagues
  5. Share and celebrate success (and failure) stories
  6. Make performance part of your workflow

I dunno | Brad Frost

I think being simultaneously curious and skeptical of new technology is healthy attitude to have.

I concur.

I want to learn new things in order to keep making good websites. I also think there’s a lot of value in talking about the difficulty in learning new things.

Fresher service workers, by default

“Ah, this is good news!”, I thought, reading this update about how service worker scripts won’t be cached.

And that was the moment when I realised what an utter nerd I had become.

CORS

A thorough explanation of the history and inner workings of Cross-Origin Resource Sharing.

Like tales of a mythical sea beast, every developer has a story to tell about the day CORS seized upon one of their web requests, dragging it down into the inexorable depths, never to be seen again.

Get to Know Jeremy Keith

I had fun answering these questions.

Progressive Web Games – Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog

I was just talking about how browser-based games are the perfect use-case for service workers. Andrzej Mazur breaks down how that would work:

  • Add to Home screen
  • Offline capabilities
  • Progressive loading

Web Components Club – A journal about learning web components

Andy Bell is documenting is journey of getting to grips with web components. I think it’s so valuable to share like this as you’re learning, instead of waiting until you’ve learned it all—the fresh perspective is so useful!

The React is “just” JavaScript Myth - daverupert.com

In my experience, there’s no casual mode within React. You need to be all-in, keeping up with the ecosystem, or else your knowledge evaporates.

I think Dave is right. At this point, it’s possible to be a React developer exclusively.

React is an ecosystem. I feel like it’s a disservice to anyone trying to learn to diminish all that React entails. React shows up on the scene with Babel, Webpack, and JSX (which each have their own learning curve) then quickly branches out into technologies like Redux, React-Router, Immutable.js, Axios, Jest, Next.js, Create-React-App, GraphQL, and whatever weird plugin you need for your app.

And, as Jake points out, you either need to go all in or not at all—you can’t really incrementally add Reactness to an existing project.

Design Patterns on CodePen

This ever-growing curated collection of interface patterns on CodePen is a reliable source of inspiration.

Know your ARIA: ‘Hidden’ vs ‘None’ | scottohara.me

When to use aria-hidden="true", and when you might need display: none:

aria-hidden by itself is not enough to completely hide an element from all users, if that is the end goal.

When to use role="presentation" (or role="none"):

Where aria-hidden can be used to completely hide content from assistive technology, modifying an element’s role to “none” or “presentation” removes the semantics of the element, but does not hide the content from assistive technologies.

Solving Life’s Problems with CSS | CSS-Tricks

It turns out that Diana Smith isn’t just a genius with CSS—she’s a fantastic writer too. This post is somehow heartfelt and lighthearted at the same time. It’s also very humorous, but beneath the humour there’s an excellent point here about the rule of least power …and doing things the long, hard, stupid way.

Because something about those limitations just calls to me. I know I’m not alone when I say that a rigid set of restrictions is the best catalyst for creativity. Total artistic freedom can be a paralyzing concept.

That can sometimes be the case with programming. If you have the most powerful programming languages in the world at your disposal, it starts to seem natural that you should then have no difficulty solving any programming problem. With all these amazing tools offering countless solutions to solve the same problem, it’s no wonder that we sometimes freeze up with information overload.

CSS Grid — Responsive layouts and components – Deemaze Writing Wall – Medium

Rafaela Ferro has written a good case study on Ev’s blog of using CSS grid to build some practical image-based responsive components.

Getting Started With CSS Layout — Smashing Magazine

Rachel gives a terrific explanation of CSS layout from first principles, starting with the default normal flow within writing systems, moving on to floats, then positioning—relative, absolute, fixed, and sticky—then flexbox, and finally grid (with a coda on alignment). This is a great primer to keep bookmarked; I think I’ll find myself returning to this more than once.