Tags: evaluating

9

sparkline

Jeremy Keith - Closing Keynote: Evaluating Technology on Vimeo

Here’s the closing keynote I gave at Frontend Conference in Zurich a couple of weeks back.

We work with technology every day. And every day it seems like there’s more and more technology to understand: graphic design tools, build tools, frameworks and libraries, not to mention new HTML, CSS and JavaScript features landing in browsers. How should we best choose which technologies to invest our time in? When we decide to weigh up the technology choices that confront us, what are the best criteria for doing that? This talk will help you evaluate tools and technologies in a way that best benefits the people who use the websites that we are designing and developing. Let’s take a look at some of the hottest new web technologies like service workers and web components. Together we will dig beneath the hype to find out whether they will really change life on the web for the better.

Jeremy Keith: Keynote - Evaluating technology - YouTube

Here’s the video of the closing keynote I gave at the Frontend United conference in Athens.

There’s fifteen minutes of Q&A at the end where I waffle on in response to some thought-provoking ideas from the audience.

Evaluating Technology – Jeremy Keith – btconfDUS2017 on Vimeo

I wasn’t supposed to speak at this year’s Beyond Tellerrand conference, but alas, Ellen wasn’t able to make it so I stepped in and gave my talk on evaluating technology.

Are we making the web too complicated? | Seldo.Com Blog

Laurie Voss on the trade-off between new powerful web dev tools, and the messiness that abusing those tools can bring:

Is modern web development fearsomely, intimidatingly complicated? Yes, and that’s a problem. Will we make it simpler? Definitely, but probably not as soon as you’d like. Is all this new complexity worthwhile? Absolutely.

I agree that there’s bound to be inappropriate use of technologies, but I don’t agree that we should just accept it:

Are there some people using a huge pile of JavaScript and a monstrous build chain to throw together a single-pager web site with one box that collects an email address? For sure. And that’s silly and unnecessary. But so what? The misuse of technology does not invalidate it.

I think we can raise our standards. Inappropriate use of technology might have been forgivable ten years ago, but if we want web development to be taken seriously as a discipline, I think we should endeavour to use our tools and technologies appropriately.

But we can all agree that the web is a wonderful thing:

Nobody but nobody loves the web more than I do. It’s my baby. And like a child, it’s frustrating to watch it struggle and make mistakes. But it’s amazing to watch it grow up.

Evaluating Technology | Calum Ryan

Calum’s write-up of the workshop I ran in Nuremberg last week.

Jeremy Keith at Render 2017 - YouTube

Here’s the opening keynote I gave at the Render Conference in Oxford. The talk is called Evaluating Technology:

We work with technology every day. And every day it seems like there’s more and more technology to understand: graphic design tools, build tools, frameworks and libraries, not to mention new HTML, CSS and JavaScript features landing in browsers. How should we best choose which technologies to invest our time in? When we decide to weigh up the technology choices that confront us, what are the best criteria for doing that? This talk will help you evaluate tools and technologies in a way that best benefits the people who use the websites that we are designing and developing. Let’s take a look at some of the hottest new web technologies and together we will dig beneath the hype to find out whether they will really change life on the web for the better.

LukeW | An Event Apart: Evaluating Technology

Luke is a live-blogging machine. Here’s the notes he made during my talk at An Event Apart Seattle.

If it reads like a rambling hodge-podge of unconnected thoughts, I could say that you had to be there …but it kinda was a rambling hodge-podge of unconnected thoughts.

Should you learn [insert shiny new tool]? | Zell Liew

This ties in nicely with the new talk I’m doing on evaluating technology. Zell proposes a five-step process:

  1. Figure out what [insert tool] does.
  2. Figure out what sucks right now
  3. Determine if it’s worth the investment
  4. Learn it (if it’s worth it)
  5. Differentiate opinions from facts

Most of the examples he gives are tools used before deployment—I have a feeling that different criteria should apply when weighing up technologies written directly in user-facing code (HTML, CSS, and JavaScript).

State of the Web: Evaluating Technology | Jeremy Keith - Zeldman on Web & Interaction Design

Jeffrey likes the new talk I debuted at An Event San Francisco. That’s nice!

Summarizing it here is like trying to describe the birth of your child in five words or less. Fortunately, you can see Jeremy give this presentation for yourself at several upcoming An Event Apart conference shows in 2017.