Tags: hamburger

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Using Hamburger Menus? Try Sausage Links · Bradley Taunt

Another take on the scrolling navigation pattern. However you feel about the implementation details, it’s got to better than the “teenage tidying” method of shoving everything behind a hamburger icon.

An oral history of the hamburger icon (from the people who were there)

From the days of Xerox PARC:

In your garage organization, there’s always a bucket for miscellaneous. You’ve got nuts and bolts and screws and nails, and then, stuff, miscellaneous stuff. That’s kind of what the hamburger menu button was.

Same as it ever was.

A couple of alternatives to the hamburger menu | Kenan Yusuf

Two (similar) patterns for responsive navigation that don’t involve sweeping everything behind a hamburger icon.

When I’ve experimented with auto-overflowing horizontal patterns like this, I’ve found that a judiciously-placed box shadow can give a nice affordance.

The Hamburger Menu Doesn’t Work - Deep Design

Building on Luke’s research, James outlines the problems with hiding navigation behind a hamburger icon. So, to be clear, the problem isn’t with the icon, so much as the way it is used as a cupboard to shovel all our messy navigation issues into.

Hamburger icon: How these three lines mystify most people - BBC News

The controversial hamburger icon goes mainstream with this story on the BBC News site.

It still amazes me that, despite clear data, many designers cling to the belief that the icon by itself is understandable (or that users will “figure it out eventually”). Why the aversion to having a label for the icon?

Hamburger Fancy: Archive

This Tumblr blog has the grandiose ambition of being “a showcase of the hottest hamburger icons on the web”, but amazingly, they’ve actually succeeded in documenting every single example of a cool hamburger icon.