Tags: head

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Time to First Byte: What It Is and Why It Matters by Harry Roberts

Harry takes a deep dive into the performance metric of “time to first byte”, or TTFB if you using initialisms that take as long to say as the thing they’re abbreviating.

This makes a great companion piece to Drew’s article on server timing headers.

5 Keys to Accessible Web Typography | Better Web Type

Some excellent explanations for these five pieces of sensible typography advice:

  1. Set your base font size in relative units
  2. Check the colour of your type and only then its contrast
  3. Use highly legible fonts
  4. Shape your paragraphs well
  5. Correctly use the heading levels

How to Section Your HTML | CSS-Tricks

A deep dive with good advice on using—and labelling—sectioning content in HTML: nav, aside, section, and article.

Tuning Performance for New and “Old” Friends | Filament Group, Inc., Boston, MA

This is a really clever technique from Scott that he unveiled at An Event Apart in Seattle. It uses a header sent by a service worker to distinguish between returning and new visitors—much neater than relying on a cookie. I’ve updated my service worker on The Session to use this technique now.

Cache-Control for Civilians – CSS Wizardry

Harry breaks down cache-control headers into steps that even I can understand. I’ll be using this a reference for sure.

Sadly, this is not The Onion

It’s not funny, cause it’s true.

Conversational Semantics · An A List Apart Article

I love, love, love all the little details of HTML that Aaron offers up here. And I really like how he positions non-visual user-agents like searchbots, screen readers, and voice assisants as headless UIs.

HTML is a truly robust and expressive language that is often overlooked and undervalued, but it has the incredible potential to nurture conversations with our users without requiring a lot of effort on our part. Simply taking the time to code web pages well will enable our sites to speak to our customers like they speak to each other. Thinking about how our sites are experienced as headless interfaces now will set the stage for more natural interactions between the real world and the digital one.

I discovered a browser bug - JakeArchibald.com

Jake’s blow-by-blow account of uncovering a serious browser vulnerability is fascinating. But if you don’t care for the technical details, skip ahead to to how different browser makers handled the issue—it’s very enlightening. (And if you do care for the technical details, make sure you click on the link to the PDF version of this post.)

Understanding the WebView Viewport in iOS 11 - Ayogo Health Inc.

One more reason not to use sticky headers on mobile.

thebaer/MMRA: Make Medium Readable Again — a browser extension

I’ve gotten a little tired of showing up to a Medium-powered site on a non-medium.com domain and getting badgered to Sign Up! or Get Updates! when I’m already a Medium user.

A Chrome extension to Make Medium Readable Again by:

  • Keeping the top navigation bar from sticking around
  • Hiding the bottom “Get Updates” bar completely
  • (Optionally) hiding the clap / share bar
  • (Optionally) loading all post images up front, instead of lazy loading as you scroll

Shame there isn’t a mobile version to get rid of the insulting install-our-app permabutton.

What Would Augment Reality? (with images, tweets) · lukew · Storify

Luke has been asking people to imagine ways of augmenting the world. Spimes are back, baby!

Let small include subheadings? · Issue #929 · w3c/html

Here’s an interesting proposal to slightly amend the semantics of the small element so it could apply to the use-case that hgroup was trying to cover.

Sticky headers

A three-part series by Remy looking at one interface pattern (a sticky header) and how his code evolved and changed:

  1. Sticky headers
  2. Smooth scroll & sticky navigation
  3. CSS sticky nav & smooth scroll

Do we need a new heading element? We don’t know - JakeArchibald.com

Jake is absolutely spot-on here. There’s been a lot of excited talk about adding an h element to HTML but it all seems to miss the question of why the currently-specced outline algorithm hasn’t been implemented.

This is a common mistake in standards discussion — a mistake I’ve made many times before. You cannot compare the current state of things, beholden to reality, with a utopian implementation of some currently non-existent thing.

If you’re proposing something almost identical to something that failed, you better know why your proposal will succeed where the other didn’t.

Jake rightly points out that the first step isn’t to propose a whole new element; it’s to ask “Why haven’t browsers implemented the outline for sectioned headings?”

(I added a small historical note in the comments pointing to the first occurrence of this proposal way back in 1991.)

Responses To The Screen Reader Strategy Survey | HeydonWorks

Heydon asked screen readers some questions about their everyday interactions with websites. The answers quite revealing: if you’re using headings and forms correctly, you’re already making life a lot easier for them.

Start Building Accessible Web Applications Today - Course by @marcysutton @eggheadio

A great series of short videos from Marcy on web accessibility.

Not OK, Computer — Track Changes

Ah, how I wish that this were published at a long-lived URL:

The one part of the web that I believe is truly genius, and that keeps standing the test of time, is the URI. The Web gave us a way to point to anything, forever. Everything else about the web has changed and grown to encyclopedic lengths, but URIs have been killing it for decades.

And yet the numbers show we’re hell-bent on screwing all that up with link-shorteners, moving URIs without redirection, and so forth. As always happens in technology we’ve taken a simple idea and found expedient ways to add fragility and complexity to it.

GitHub’s CSP journey - GitHub Engineering

A step-by-step walkthrough of how GitHub has tweaked its Content Security Policy over time. There are some valuable insights here, and I’m really, really happy to see companies share this kind of information.

Service Workers: Save your User’s Data using the Save-Data Header | Dean Hume

I hadn’t heard of the save-data header. This article shows how you can use a Service Worker to sniff for it and serve up smaller assets, but I’m guessing you could also sniff for it from the server.

securityheaders.io

A quick way of testing for some fairly easy to fix security leakage from your server’s headers.

I say easy to fix, but I find the fix for public key-pins pant-shittingly intimidating.