Link tags: hell

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CSS Hell - To Hell with bad CSS!

Collection of common CSS mistakes, and how to fix them.

I like the way this is organised: it’s like “code smells” for CSS. Some of them will probably be familiar, in which case, you can dive in and find out what’s going on.

Building Progressive Web Apps | nearForm

It is very disheartening to read misinformation like this:

A progressive web app is an enhanced version of a Single Page App (SPA) with a native app feel.

To quote from The Last Jedi, “Impressive. Everything you just said in that sentence is wrong.”

But once you get over that bit of misinformation at the start, the rest of this article is a good run-down of planning and building a progressive web app using one possible architectural choice—the app shell model. Other choices are available.

Learn Web Design Fundamentals and Shortcuts with Hello Web Design - Hello Web Books

Tracy’s new book is excellent (and I had the great honour of writing a foreword for it).

Programmers, developers, marketers, and non-designers — want to become a better designer? This short book has everything you need.

Progressive Progressive Web Apps - Tales of a Developer Advocate by Paul Kinlan

Paul goes into detail describing how he built a progressive web app that’s actually progressive (in the sense of “enhancement”). Most of the stuff about sharing code between server and client goes over my head, but I understood enough to get these points:

  • the “app shell” model is not the only—or even the best—way of building a progressive web app, and
  • always, always, always render from the server first.

Introducing PWAs

The slides from Calum’s presentation about progressive web apps. There are links throughout to some handy resources.

The best of Google I/O 2016 | Andrew Betts

Andrew picks out his favourite bits from this year’s Google I/O, covering web payments, CSS containment, and—of course—Service Workers and progressive web apps, although he does note (and I concur):

I wish Google would focus as much attention on ‘normal’ sites that perform navigations as they do on so called ‘app-shell’ (which is just a new name for single-page apps, as far as I can tell), but then many people will be building SPAs and these recipes will make those apps fly. In news publishing we seem to flip flop between traditional page navigations and SPAs, but I’ve never found a SPA news site (or a native app) that I really like more than a normal website. Maybe a really good progressive web app will change that. But I’m not convinced.

Still, as he says:

All this really just underscores how flexible ServiceWorker is and that with it we can disagree on what the right solution is, but we can all get what we want anyway.

Instant Loading Web Apps With An Application Shell Architecture | Web Updates - Google Developers

Outlining the architectural thinking required to create what the Google devrel folks are calling progressive apps.

Browsers without service worker support should always be served a fall-back experience. In our demo, we fall back to basic static server-side rendering…

Yay!

…but this is only one of many options.

Hmmm. In my opinion, sending usable HTML on first request isn’t an implementation detail—it’s crucial. But on the whole, this approach is very sensible indeed.

Marcel The Shell With Shoes On, Three - YouTube

Do you want to know what the truth is about shrimps? They’re the idiots of the sea! One time I saw a shrimp just swim right into a rock.

MARCEL THE SHELL WITH SHOES ON, THREE

OS X bash Update 1.0 – OS X Mavericks

Incredibly, you have to manually download and run this patch for Shellshock on OS X: it’s not being pushed as a security update.

But the new U2 album? That’s being pushed to everyone.

Coding Horror: Suspension, Ban or Hellban?

A nice little round-up of some techniques for dealing with trolls in online communities. I must remember some of this stuff for The Session.

Clichés are hard

An offhand remark I made on Twitter spurs Dom on to do a whole lotta research on character encoding in class names.