Tags: iQ



Dirty Tricks From The Dark Corners Of Front-End // Speaker Deck

Vitaly calls them dirty tricks but this is a handy collection of front-end development techniques. They’re not really dirty …just slightly soiled.

Banjos and Discrete Technologies | stevebenford

An examination of how sites like The Session are meshing with older ideas of traditional Irish music:

There is a very interesting tension at play here – one that speaks directly to the design of new technologies. On the one hand, Irish musicians appear to be enthusiastically adopting digital media to establish a common repertoire of tunes, while on the other the actual performance of these tunes in a live session is governed by a strong etiquette that emphasizes the importance of playing by ear.

There’s an accompanying paper called Supporting Traditional Music-Making: Designing for Situated Discretion (PDF).

Why I love working with the web

I love this. I really love this. Remy absolutely nails what makes the web so great.

There’s the ubiquity:

If the viewer is using the latest technology beefy desktop computer that’s great. Equally they could view the website from a work computer, something old and locked in using a browser called IE8.

Then there’s the low barrier to entry—yes, even today:

It’s the web’s simplicity. Born out of a need to connect documents. As much as that might have changed with the latest generation of developers who might tell you that it’s hard and complex (and they’re right), at the same time it is not complicated. It’s still beautifully simple.

Anyone can do it. Anyone can publish content to the web, be it as plain text, or simple HTML formed only of <p> tags or something more elaborate and refined. The web is unabashed of it’s content. Everything and anything goes.

I might just print this out and nail it to the wall.

If you sit back for a moment, and think about just how many lives you can touch simply by publishing something, anything, to the web, it’s utterly mind blowing.

Learn Sketch 3 - Design+Code

A very handy introduction to Sketch from an iOS-specific book. See also the subsequent chapter, Mastering Sketch 3.

Design machines | Louder Than Ten

When another company achieves success, there’s a lot of pressure to investigate what they did right and apply that to our own organizations.

But we still have a chance. As long as we run brave organizations made up of even braver souls who are willing to embrace expression, trust their intuition and experiences, and stand up when everyone else is sitting down, we will survive.

Progressive Enhancement Basics

Some thoughts on progressive enhancement, although I disagree with the characterisation of progressive enhancement as being the opposite choice to making “something flashy that pushes the web to it’s limits”—it’s entirely possible to make the flashiest, limit-pushing sites using progressive enhancement. After all…

it’s much more a mindset than a particular development technique.

Front-end performance for web designers and front-end developers by Harry Roberts

A really good introduction to front-end performance techniques. Most of this was already on my radar, but I still picked up a handy tip or two (particularly about DNS prefetching).

At this stage it should go without saying that you should be keeping up with this kind of thing: performance is really, really, really important.

{ io: The Web Is Growing Up }

A lovely bit of hypertext.

Blame the implementation, not the technique | TimKadlec.com

It might seem like an obvious point, but what Tim is talking about here happens over and over again: a technique is dismissed based on bad implementation.

It’s Not Working For Me: #crit | Mark Boulton

Mark talks about design criticism. This makes a great companion piece to the Jon Kolko article on design criticism that I linked to last week.

Do you want critique, or a hug? | Austin Center for Design

Jon Kolko shares his advice on accepting design criticism.

Resizable Displays | Fluid Interfaces

See now, this is why liquid layouts are the way to go.

Script Junkie | Flexibility: A Foundation for Responsive Design

Emily walks us through a responsive design case study, stressing the importance using percentages for layout.

LukeW | Multi-Device Layout Patterns

Luke catalogues layout patterns in responsive designs.

HTML5 and CSS3 Advent 2011

Here’s a geek advent calendar I missed. There are some great CSS techniques here.

Fluid Baseline Grid - A sensible HTML5 and CSS3 development kit

A set of default styles to get started on a mobile-first responsive design.

You Say Responsive, I Say Adaptive | Sparkbox

On the importance of using fluid grids as part of responsive web design:

We do responsive web design, but we don’t do it for the sake of being trendy. We do it because we believe it’s the way websites should be made. This is an opportunity for us to finally embrace the dynamic medium we build for. The web is not fixed width.

Responsive Data Tables | CSS-Tricks

Some good ideas for formatting tabular data for small screens.

Tips, Tricks and Best Practices for Responsive Design | Webmonkey | Wired.com

A nice round-up of responsive design techniques, with a particular focus on content first.

Fit To Scale | Trent Walton

More documentation of a responsive redesign, this time from Trent Walton. Be sure to check out the FitText jQuery plug-in that was created as a result.