Link tags: layers

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The difference between HTML, CSS, and JavaScript | Zell Liew

HTML lets you create the structure of a website.

CSS lets you make the website look nice.

JavaScript lets you change HTML and CSS. Because it lets you change HTML and CSS, it can do tons of things.

Phenological Mismatch - e-flux Architecture - e-flux

Over the last fifty years, we have come to recognize that the fuel of our civilizational expansion has become the main driver of our extinction, and that of many of the species we share the planet with. We are now coming to realize that is as true of our cognitive infrastructure. Something is out of sync, felt everywhere: something amiss in the temporal order, and it is as related to political and technological shifts, shifts in our own cognition and attention, as it is to climatic ones. To think clearly in such times requires an intersectional understanding of time itself, a way of thinking that escapes the cognitive traps, ancient and modern, into which we too easily fall. Because our technologies, the infrastructures we have built to escape our past, have turned instead to cancelling our future.

James writes beautifully about rates of change.

The greatest trick our utility-directed technologies have performed is to constantly pull us out of time: to distract us from the here and now, to treat time as a kind of fossil fuel which can be endlessly extracted in the service of a utopian future which never quite arrives. If information is the new oil, we are already, in the hyper-accelerated way of present things, well into the fracking age, with tremors shuddering through the landscape and the tap water on fire. But this is not enough; it will never be enough. We must be displaced utterly in time, caught up in endless imaginings of the future while endlessly neglecting the lessons and potential actions of the present moment.

Building on Vimeo

Here’s the video of the opening talk I gave at New Adventures earlier this year. I think it’s pretty darn good!

Building a Progressively-Enhanced Site | Jim Nielsen’s Blog

This is an excellent case study!

The technical details are there if you want them, but far more important is consideration that went into every interaction. Every technical decision has a well thought out justification.

When to use CSS vs. JavaScript | Go Make Things

Chris Ferdinandi has a good rule of thumb:

If something I want to do with JavaScript can be done with CSS instead, use CSS.

Makes sense, given their differing error-handling models:

A JavaScript error can bring all of the JS on a page to screeching halt. Mistype a CSS property or miss a semicolon? The browser just skips the property and moves on. Use an unsupported feature? Same thing.

But he also cautions against going too far with CSS. Anything to do with state should be done with JavaScript:

If the item requires interaction from the user, use JavaScript (things like hovering, focusing, clicking, etc.).

‘Sfunny; I remember when we got pseudo-classes, I wrote a somewhat tongue-in-cheek post called :hover Considered Harmful:

Presentation and behaviour… the twain have met, the waters are muddied, the issues are confused.

Salty JavaScript analogy - HankChizlJaw

JavaScript is like salt. If you add just enough salt to a dish, it’ll help make the flavour awesome. Add too much though, and you’ll completely ruin it.

The Fast and Slow of Design

Prompted by his recent talk at Smashing Conference, Mark explains why he’s all about the pace layers when it comes to design systems. It’s good stuff, and ties in nicely with my recent (pace layers obsessed) talk at An Event Apart.

Structure for pace. Move at the appropriate speed.

Think like it’s 1995; code like it’s 2035 - Grayscale

This is such a great write-up of the workshop I did in Hong Kong!

Jeremy, it was a pleasure to work with you and you are always welcome here in Hong Kong!

If you fancy having this one-day workshop at your company, get in touch.

LukeW | An Event Apart: The Way of the Web

Here are Luke’s notes from the talk I just gave at An Event Apart in Seattle.

Pace Layering: How Complex Systems Learn and Keep Learning

There’s a running joke at just about any gathering at Clearleft where we measure TTPL—Time To Pace Layers—a measurement of how long we can discuss anything before making an inevitable reference to Stewart Brand’s framing.

It’s one of those concepts that, once your brain has been exposed, you start seeing everywhere. Like bad kerning or sexism.

What Are You Reading? – Jorge Arango

A pace layer model for readers (and writers).

The cost of change | The White Site

Ben points to a new product aiming to ease the pain of connected devices bumping up against the harsh realities of shearing layers:

By exposing the ‘hardwiring’ of our electrical systems, Conduct emphasises how much we rely on existing systems to power our ‘new’ technology – the rate of change and advancement in our traditional technologies moves at a much slower pace than our mobile app-based world and there are physical limitations as a result of this hardwired legacy.

I am—unsurprisingly—in favour of exposing the seams like this.

The work I like. — Ethan Marcotte

Ethan’s been thinking about the trends he’s noticed in the work he’s doing:

  • prototypes over mockups,
  • preserving patterns at scale, and
  • thinking about a design’s layers.

On that last point…

The web’s evolution has never been charted along a straight line: it’s simultaneously getting slower and faster, with devices new and old coming online every day.

That’s why I’ve realized just how much I like designing in layers. I love looking at the design of a page, a pattern, whatever, and thinking about how it’ll change if, say, fonts aren’t available, or JavaScript doesn’t work, or if someone doesn’t see the design as you and I might, and is having the page read aloud to them.

Designing Experience Layers — sixtwothree.org

The engineering benefits of building websites with a layered approach.

Why, yes, I am talking about progressive enhancement yet again! Why do you ask?