Link tags: maintenance

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Through a design system, darkly. — Ethan Marcotte

  1. Design systems haven’t “solved” inconsistency. Rather, they’ve shifted how and when it manifests.
  2. Many design systems have introduced another, deeper issue: a problem of visibility.

Ethan makes the case that it’s time we stopped taking a pattern-led approach to design systems and start taking a process-led approach. I agree. I think there’s often more emphasis on the “design” than the “system”.

Maintaining Performance - daverupert.com

In my experience, 99% of the time Web Performance boils down to two problems:

  1. “You wrote too much JavaScript.”
  2. “You have unoptimized images.”

But as Dave points out, the real issue is this:

I find that Web Performance isn’t particularly difficult once you understand the levers you can pull; reduce kilobytes, reduce requests, unblock rendering, defer scripts. But maintaining performance that’s a different story entirely…

On design systems and agency | Andrew Travers

Design systems can often ‘read’ as very top down, but need to be bottom up to reflect the needs of different users of different services in different contexts.

I’ve yet to be involved in a design system that hasn’t struggled to some extent for participation and contribution from the whole of its design community.

Design System Won’t Fix Your Problems | Viljami Salminen

This is something we’ve learned at Clearleft—you can’t create a design system for an organisation, hand it over to them, and expect it to be maintained.

You can’t just hire an agency to create a design system and expect that the system alone will solve something. It won’t do much before the people in the organization align on this idea as well, believe in it, invest in it, and create a culture of collaboration around it.

The people who will be living with the design system must be (co-)creators of it. That’s very much the area we work in now.

Frank Chimero · Who cares?

Aaaaaand the circle is now complete.

Frank—whose post on architects and gardeners inspired my post on design systems and automation—has now written his follow-on post about all of this. His position?

It is a crisis of care.

As with anything, it’s not about the technology itself:

A well-made design system created for the right reasons is reparative. One created for the wrong reasons becomes a weapon for displacement. Tools are always beholden to values. This is well-trodden territory.

(Open) source of anxiety – Increment: Open Source

If we continue as we are, who will maintain the maintainers?

In the world of open source, we tend to give plaudits and respect to makers …but maintainers really need our support and understanding.

Users and new contributors often don’t see, much less think about, the nontechnical issues—like mental health, or work-life balance, or project governance—that maintainers face. And without adequate support, our digital infrastructure, as well as the people who make it run, suffer.

I, Maintainer

Maintaining an open source project is a rollercoaster ride with high peaks and very low troughs.

Release frequency is down. Questions increasingly go unanswered. Issues remain in a triage, unresolved state. Uncertainty and frustration brew within the community room.

Brian’s experience with Pattern Lab very much mirrors Mark’s experience with Fractal. The pressure. The stress. But there’s also the community.

A maintainer must keep the needs of their project, their community, and their own needs in constant harmony.

This is hard!

Building and maintaining a design system | susan jean robertson

Susan writes about the challenges when trying to get widespread adoption of a design system. Spoiler: the challenges aren’t technical.

Change is hard. Communication and collaboration are absolutely necessary to make a system work. And the more people you can get involved from various disciplines the better chance you have of maintaining your system.

Twenty Eighteen Preparation: Becoming an Endless Newbie - Airbag Industries

In the past, when I brushed off new advances or updates to technology and processes I preferred to stick with a simple path of “it still works fine,” but in doing so I realize now that I have l lost a lot beginning with the ability to function with current best practices in certain areas of my skill sets and the degradation a few projects, especially Airbag.

Web Components: The Long Game – Infrequently Noted

One of the things we’d hoped to enable via Web Components was a return to ctrl-r web development. At some level of complexity and scale we all need tools to help cope with code size, application structure, and more. But the tender, loving maintainance of babel and webpack and NPM configurations that represents a huge part of “front end development” today seems…punitive. None of this should be necessary when developing one (or a few) components and composing things shouldn’t be this hard. The sophistication of the tools needs to get back to being proportional with the complexity of the problem at hand.

I completely agree with Alex here. But that’s also why I was surprised and disheartened when I linked to Monica’s excellent introduction to web components that a package manager seemed to be a minimum requirement.

You Are Not Paid to Write Code – Brave New Geek

Gall’s Fundamental Theorem of Systems is that new systems mean new problems. I think the same can safely be said of code—more code, more problems. Do it without a new system if you can

A cautionary tale of the risks involved with embracing new frameworks.

But when you introduce a new system, you introduce new variables, new failure points, and new problems.

almost anything is easier to get into than out of.

On Style Maintenance | CSS-Tricks

This is a very thoughtful analysis of different approaches to writing maintainable CSS, which—let’s face it—is the hard bit.

I often joke that I don’t want to hire a code ninja. Ninjas come in the middle of the night and leave a bloody mess.

I want a code janitor. Someone who walks the hallways of code, cleaning up pieces, dusting up neglected parts, shinning up others, tossing unnecessary bits. I prefer this gentler, more accurate analogy. This is the person you want on your team. This is a person you want in your code reviews.

Also, can I just say how refreshing it is to read an article that doesn’t treat the cascade like a disease to be wiped out? This article even goes so far as to suggest that the cascade might actually be a feature—shock! horror!

The cascade can help, if you understand and organize it. This is the same as any sophisticated software design. You can look at what you’re building and make responsible decisions on your build and design. You decide what can be at a top-level and needs to be inherited by other, smaller, pieces.

There’s a lot of really good stuff in here to mull over.

My hope for this article is to encourage developers to think ahead. We’re all in this together, and the best we can do is learn from one another.

Percussive Maintenance on Vimeo

Have you tried turning it off and on again?

necolas/idiomatic-css

Some sensible ideas about having a consistent CSS writing style.