Tags: markup

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Do we need a new heading element? We don’t know - JakeArchibald.com

Jake is absolutely spot-on here. There’s been a lot of excited talk about adding an h element to HTML but it all seems to miss the question of why the currently-specced outline algorithm hasn’t been implemented.

This is a common mistake in standards discussion — a mistake I’ve made many times before. You cannot compare the current state of things, beholden to reality, with a utopian implementation of some currently non-existent thing.

If you’re proposing something almost identical to something that failed, you better know why your proposal will succeed where the other didn’t.

Jake rightly points out that the first step isn’t to propose a whole new element; it’s to ask “Why haven’t browsers implemented the outline for sectioned headings?”

(I added a small historical note in the comments pointing to the first occurrence of this proposal way back in 1991.)

The average web page from top twenty Google results

Ever wondered what the most commonly used HTML elements are?

DirtyMarkup · Tidy up your HTML, CSS, and JavaScript code

A handy prettifier for front-end code. Useful if you’re trying to find something inside code markup, CSS, or JavaScript that’s been minified.

Front-End Developers Are Information Architects Too ◆ 24 ways

Some great thoughts here from Francis on how crafting solid HTML is information architecture.

Progressive enhancement and team memberships

A really nice pattern, similar to one I wrote about a little while back. There’s also this little gem of an observation:

Progressive enhancement is also well-suited to Agile, as you can start with the core functionality and then iterate.

FormLinter—Detect common issues that hurt conversions

A little tool for testing common form issues.

  • Did we remember to give every input a label? (No, placeholders are not an adequate replacement)?
  • Do our labels’ for attributes match our inputs’ ids?
  • Did we take advantage of the url, email, and password input types, or did we forget and just use text?
  • Are our required fields marked as such?

Custom Elements: an ecosystem still being worked out - Tales of a Developer Advocate

Really, really smart thinking from Paul here, musing on the power relationship between the creators of custom elements and the users of custom elements.

Create a MarkDown tag - JSFiddle

This is nice example of a web component that degrades gracefully—if custom elements aren’t supported, you still get the markdown content, just not converted to HTML.

<ah-markdown>
## Render some markdown!
</ah-markdown>

The Lost Art of HTML | shaunrashid.com

Building a good foundation using HTML is like building a good foundation for a house. Without it, you run the risk of having to deal with issues that are difficult and expensive to fix later on.

From WordPress to Apple News, Instant Articles, and AMP - The Media Temple Blog

Chris runs through the process and pitfalls of POSSEing a site (like CSS Tricks) to Apple’s News app, Facebook’s Instant Articles, and Google’s AMP.

Hey, whatever you want. As long as…

  1. It’s not very much work
  2. The content’s canonical home is my website.

I just want people to read and like CSS-Tricks.

Responses To The Screen Reader Strategy Survey | HeydonWorks

Heydon asked screen readers some questions about their everyday interactions with websites. The answers quite revealing: if you’re using headings and forms correctly, you’re already making life a lot easier for them.

I Wanted To Type a Number | Filament Group, Inc., Boston, MA

Choosing the right input type for your form field.

Aria-Controls is Poop | HeydonWorks

I wrote a while back about how I switched from using a button to using a link for progressive disclosure patterns. That looks like it was a good move—if I use a button, I’d need to use aria-controls and, as Heydon outlines here, the screen reader support is pants.

MarkApp: Building apps with HTML

Here’s an interesting collection from Lea: small JavaScript libraries that do their configuration declaratively via HTML, rather than in JavaScript.

Start Building Accessible Web Applications Today - Course by @marcysutton @eggheadio

A great series of short videos from Marcy on web accessibility.

Progressive Enhancement for JavaScript App Developers | De Voorhoede

Build JS apps responsibly - cover your basics, render strategically and enhance into true apps.

Web Design in 4 minutes

This is a wonderful way of progressively explaining the layered approach to building for the web that Charlotte was teaching in her Codebar workshop.

A Code Review, Or Yet Another Reason to Love the Web | Brad Frost

I love this back and forth between Brad and Jonathon. I think they’ve both got some good ideas:

  • I agree with Brad that you can start marking up these kind of patterns before you’ve got visual designs.
  • I agree with Jonathon that it’s often better to have a generic wrapper element to avoid making assumptions about which elements will be used.

shawnbot/custom-elements: All about HTML Custom Elements

A good introduction to custom elements, one piece of the web components stack.

That said, when using custom elements—or anything involving JavaScript, for that matter—you should always design experiences for progressive enhancement, and plan for the possibility that JavaScript isn’t enabled or available.

Hmmm …that’s kind of hard when JavaScript is required to make custom elements work at all.

Accessibility Matters: Meet Our New Book, “Inclusive Design Patterns” (Pre-Release) – Smashing Magazine

I think it’s a safe bet that this new book by Heydon will be absolutely brilliant.

It’s a handbook with valuable, time-saving techniques that will help you avoid hacky workarounds and solve common issues effectively.