Tags: progressive



Refreshing The Verge: no platform like home - The Verge

Mandy is fighting the good fight for the open web from within Vox Media. Her publishing tools have been built with a secret weapon…

This practice — which I refer to unoriginally as progressively enhanced storytelling — also has the added benefit of helping us make our content more accessible to more kinds of users, especially those with disabilities.

The Web Platform Podcast : 111 Extensible Web Components on Huffduffer

I spoke my brains in this podcast episode, all about web components, progressive enhancement and backwards compatibility.

Building Social: A Case Study On Progressive Enhancement – Smashing Magazine

A step-by-step walkthrough of layering on enhancements to a site. The article shows the code used, but it isn’t really the code that matters—it’s the thought and planning that went into it.

Progressive Misconceptions, From the Notebook of Aaron Gustafson

Good stuff from Aaron…

Progressive enhancement embraces the idea of experience as a continuum rather than some singular ideal.

Progressive enhancement should not be viewed as a challenge to JavaScript any more than concepts like namespacing, test driven development, or file concatenation & minification are; it’s just another way to improve your code.

Progressive enhancement’s focus on providing a baseline experience that makes no assumptions about browser features will provide a robust foundation for any project.

Technical Credit by Chris Taylor

Riffing on an offhand comment I made about progressive enhancement being a form of “technical credit”, Chris dives deep into what exactly that means. There’s some really great thinking here.

With such a wide array of both expected and unexpected properties of the current technological revolution, building our systems in such a way to both be resilient to potential failures and benefit from unanticipated events surely is a no-brainer.

Does Progressive Enhancement Have a Place in Today’s Web? - George Brocklehurst, thoughtbot - YouTube

Spoiler: the answer is “Yes!”.

It’s a way of building web applications that’s very similar to making a sandwich.

This talk is itself a tasty sandwich of good stuff.

Enhancing a comment form: From basic to custom error message to BackgroundSync | justmarkup

This is a truly fantastic example of progressive enhancement applied to a form.

What I love about this is that it shows how progressive enhancement isn’t a binary on/off choice: there are layers and layers of enhancements here, from simple inline validation all the way to service workers and background sync, with many options in between.


The Web is not Fashionable. - The blog of Ada Rose Edwards

This is such a great perspective on what it’s like to build for the web over the long term. The web will always be a little bit broken, and that’s okay—we can plan for that.

The Web has history. If you build with web technology it will stick around. We try not to break the web even if it means the mistakes and bad decisions we have made in the past (and will make in the future) get set in stone.

Is animation “just” an enhancement? + WebGL effects & SVG paths explained - The UI Animation Newsletter  #16.30

Yes! Yes! Yes! Val nails the essence of progressive enhancement:

Never feel like it’s a waste to dedicate time to the enhancements; to put real thought and effort into your animations and what they’ll contribute to the experience. Progressive enhancement is all about freeing up your time to make the enhancements great once you’ve got that basic core functionality covered. That’s the path to making new and wonderful things on the web while also being responsible. It’s quite literally a way to get the best of both worlds.

What about CSS? Progressive Enhancement & CSS // Speaker Deck

I heard nothing but good things about this talk from the Fronteers conference. There’s some great stuff in here—I really like its historical perspective.

A Redesign with CSS Shapes · An A List Apart Article

Eric walks through a really nice use of CSS shapes and @supports on a page of the An Event Apart site.

It’s a nice little illustration of how we can use advanced features of CSS right now, without the usual wait for widespread support.

“Resilience” - View Source Conference Closing Keynote by Jeremy Keith - YouTube

Here’s the video of the talk I gave in Berlin recently. I had a lot to squeeze into a short time slot so I just went for it, and I got bit carried away …but people seemed to like that.

First impressions of React

I’m following Remy’s experiments with great interest—his approach sounds like the holy grail:

I’m trying to build a web app that uses progressive enhancement as a design principle with state as a core value to the coding approach.

Progressive Web Apps Simply Make Sense - Cloud Four

Progressive Web Apps versus native is the wrong question because every step on the path to a Progressive Web App makes sense on its own, irrespective of what a company does with their native apps.

Not all of your customers are going to have your app installed. For those who visit via the web, providing them with a better experience will make them happier and generate more revenue for your business.

It’s really that simple.

SpeedCurve | PWA Performance

Steve describes a script you can use on WebPageTest to simulate going offline so you can test how your progressive web app performs.

Why we use progressive enhancement to build GOV.UK | Technology at GDS

This is a terrific read that gets to the heart of why progressive enhancement is such a solid methodology: progressive enhancement improves resilience.

Meeting our many users’ needs is number one on our list of design principles. We can’t know every different setup a person might use while building our systems, but we can build them in a way that gives all of our users the greatest chance of success. Progressive enhancement lets us do this.

The article is full of great insights from a very large-scale web project.

An intro to progressive web apps | 8th Light

A nice introduction to progressive web apps. There’s a little bit of confusion about permissions—whether a site has been added to the home screen or not has no effect on the permissions granted to it (for things like push notifications)—but the wrap-up nails the advantages of using the web:

No more waiting to download an app, no more prompts for updating an app. From a developer perspective, it means we will be able to iterate a lot quicker. We don’t need to wait for app store approvals anymore, and we can deploy at our own leisure.

Another advantage that a progressive web app has over a native mobile app is that it is linkable, hence it is easier to share and, probably even more importantly, can be indexed by search engines. This makes discoverability of the app a lot better.

Nordic.js 2016 • Jeremy Keith - Resilience: Tried and tested approaches - YouTube

I’m just back from a little mini 3-conference tour of Europe where I was delivering my talk on resilience. The first stop was Stockholm for Nordic.js and the video is already online.

What, Exactly, Makes Something A Progressive Web App? | Infrequently Noted

Alex runs through the features that a progressive web app must have, should have, and would be nice to have.

In general, installability criteria are tightening. Today’s Good-To-Haves may become part of tomorrow’s baseline. The opposite is unlikely because at least one major browser has made a strong commitment to tightening up the rules for installability.

Right now, this is in the nice-to-have category:

Mobile-friendly, not mobile-only.

Personally, I’d put that in the must-have category, and not just for progressive web apps.

Anyway, read on for some advice on testing and tooling when it comes to evaluating progressive web apps.