Tags: reading

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Creating distraction-free reading experiences — Adrian Zumbrunnen

It’s our job as designers to bring clarity back to the digital canvas by crafting reading experiences that put readers first.

The ‘Future Book’ Is Here, but It’s Not What We Expected | WIRED

Craig writes about reading and publishing, from the memex and the dynabook to the Kindle, the iPhone, and the iPad, all the way back around to plain ol’ email and good old-fashioned physical books.

We were looking for the Future Book in the wrong place. It’s not the form, necessarily, that needed to evolve—I think we can agree that, in an age of infinite distraction, one of the strongest assets of a “book” as a book is its singular, sustained, distraction-free, blissfully immutable voice. Instead, technology changed everything that enables a book, fomenting a quiet revolution. Funding, printing, fulfillment, community-building—everything leading up to and supporting a book has shifted meaningfully, even if the containers haven’t. Perhaps the form and interactivity of what we consider a “standard book” will change in the future, as screens become as cheap and durable as paper. But the books made today, held in our hands, digital or print, are Future Books, unfuturistic and inert may they seem.

The 15 Web Design Books of 2018 You Can’t Afford to Miss

How lovely! Going Offline is in very good company in this list, and Oliver has some nice words to say about it:

Starting with no assumption of JavaScript knowledge, Jeremy explains the latest strategies, the ins and outs of fetching and caching, how to enhance your website’s performance, and more.

Extremely beginner-friendly and approachable, it can be read in half a day and will help you get Service Workers up and running in no time.

But all I want for Christmas is for Shopify to stop enabling Breitbart.

Going Offline by Jeremy Keith – a post by Marc Thiele

This is such a lovely, lovely review from Marc!

Jeremy’s way of writing certainly helps, as a specialised or technical book on a topic like Service Workers, could certainly be one, that bores you to death with dry written explanations. But Jeremy has a friendly, fresh and entertaining way of writing books. Sometimes I caught myself with a grin on my face…

Going Offline - Polytechnic

This is a lovely review of Going Offline from Garrett:

With his typical self-effacing humour (chapter titles include Making Fetch Happen and Cache Me If You Can), and easy manner, Jeremy explains how Service Workers, uh, work, the clever things you can do with them, and most importantly, how to build your own.

Best of all, he’s put it into action!

To that end, this site now has its own home-grown, organic, corn fed, Service Worker.

Resilient Web Design with Jeremy Keith | Meetup

People of Boston: I’m doing a book reading at your CSS meet-up on Wednesday, June 27th.

(Marketing genius that I am, I won’t be reading from my newest book, which is on sale now, but from the previous book, which is available for free online.)

Going Offline with ServiceWorker | text/plain

This is such a nice review of Going Offline from Eric!

As anyone who has received unsolicited (or solicited) feedback from me about their book knows, I’m an extremely picky reader, and I have no significant complaints on this one. Highly recommended.

Going Offline: Designing An Ideal Offline Experience With Service Workers By Jeremy Keith

Here’s a great even-handed in-depth review of Going Offline:

If you’re interested in the “offline first” movement or want to learn more about Service Workers, Going Offline by Jeremy Keith is a really gentle and highly accessible introduction to the topic. At times, it even felt “too gentle”, with Keith taking a moment here and there to explain what a “variable” is and what “JSON” (JavaScript Object Notation) is. But, this just goes to show you the unassuming and welcoming mindset behind writing a book like this one.

Jeremy Keith: Going Offline | visualgui

Here’s a lovely review of Going Offline from fellow author, Donny Truong:

Jeremy’s technical writing is as superb as always. Similar to his first book for A Book Apart, which cleared up all my confusions about HTML5, Going Offline helps me put the pieces of the service workers’ puzzle together.

Sara Soueidan: Going Offline

Sara describes the process of turning her site into a progressive web app, and has some very kind words to say about my new book:

Jeremy covers literally everything you need to know to write and install your first Service Worker, tweak it to your site’s needs, and then write the Web App Manifest file to complete the offline experience, all in a ridiculously easy to follow style. It doesn’t matter if you’re a designer, a junior developer or an experienced engineer — this book is perfect for anyone who wants to learn about Service Workers and take their Web application to a whole new level.

Too, too kind!

I highly recommend it. I read the book over the course of two days, but it can easily be read in half a day. And as someone who rarely ever reads a book cover to cover (I tend to quit halfway through most books), this says a lot about how good it is.

Braille Neue

I love this idea (and implementation)—instead of treating braille signage as something “separate but equal”, this typeface attempts to unify lettering and braille into one.

Braille Neue is a universal typeface that combines braille with existing characters. This typeface communicates to both the sighted and blind people in the same space.

House Elves

Perspectives other than our own bring a breath of fresh air. They open doors and allow light to flood in. They wrap us in a warm, comforting blanket by letting us know other people go through similar struggles. There is a tonne of writing out there that exists because the author suffered through something. Suffering tends to give you a strong desire to prevent others experiencing similar pain.

Offscreen Magazine Interview — by Craig Mod

Craig talks about reading, writing, books, publishing, and Amazon:

Kindle and non-Kindle book sales account for less than two percent of Amazon’s market cap. The Kindle could disappear tomorrow, and Amazon would not be materially affected. Even from a branding perspective, I don’t think AMAZON = BOOKS anymore, certainly not to younger consumers. AMAZON = PRIME. PRIME = A 3D PRINTER on a one-day time-delay that deposits anything you can imagine on your doorstep.

There’s also this about the double-edged sword of working at scale:

Does affecting one hundred lives turn you on? A thousand? A million? A billion? Why? What does it mean to have a positive impact on a life? How intimate does that connection need to be? Understanding your scale — the scale that moves you — is critical to understanding with whom and how you should work, how you should live.

Robin Rendle › How to Read the Internet

The past, present and future of RSS.

If I had to choose my Twitter account over my RSS setup I wouldn’t hesitate for a second — I’d throw Twitter right into the ocean.

My favourite books (and games) about the apocalypse

Plague; zombie; nuclear …Anna’s got them all covered in her roundup of apocalyptic literature and games.

V6: Typography and Proportions | Rob Weychert

Rob walks us through the typographic choices for his recent redesign:

Most of what I design that incorporates type has a typographic scale as its foundation, which informs the typeface choices and layout proportions. The process of creating that scale begins by asking what the type needs to do, and what role contrasting sizes will play in that.

Learn Web Design Fundamentals and Shortcuts with Hello Web Design - Hello Web Books

Tracy’s new book is excellent (and I had the great honour of writing a foreword for it).

Programmers, developers, marketers, and non-designers — want to become a better designer? This short book has everything you need.

What Are You Reading? – Jorge Arango

A pace layer model for readers (and writers).

Web Typography: Designing Tables to be Read, Not Looked At · An A List Apart Article

An extract from Richard’s excellent book, this is a deep dive into styling tables for the web (featuring some CSS I had never even heard of).

Tables can be beautiful but they are not works of art. Instead of painting and decorating them, design tables for your reader.

(It also contains a splendid use of the term “crawl bar.”)