Tags: ress

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First impressions of React

I’m following Remy’s experiments with great interest—his approach sounds like the holy grail:

I’m trying to build a web app that uses progressive enhancement as a design principle with state as a core value to the coding approach.

Progressive Web Apps Simply Make Sense - Cloud Four

Progressive Web Apps versus native is the wrong question because every step on the path to a Progressive Web App makes sense on its own, irrespective of what a company does with their native apps.

Not all of your customers are going to have your app installed. For those who visit via the web, providing them with a better experience will make them happier and generate more revenue for your business.

It’s really that simple.

SpeedCurve | PWA Performance

Steve describes a script you can use on WebPageTest to simulate going offline so you can test how your progressive web app performs.

Why we use progressive enhancement to build GOV.UK | Technology at GDS

This is a terrific read that gets to the heart of why progressive enhancement is such a solid methodology: progressive enhancement improves resilience.

Meeting our many users’ needs is number one on our list of design principles. We can’t know every different setup a person might use while building our systems, but we can build them in a way that gives all of our users the greatest chance of success. Progressive enhancement lets us do this.

The article is full of great insights from a very large-scale web project.

An intro to progressive web apps | 8th Light

A nice introduction to progressive web apps. There’s a little bit of confusion about permissions—whether a site has been added to the home screen or not has no effect on the permissions granted to it (for things like push notifications)—but the wrap-up nails the advantages of using the web:

No more waiting to download an app, no more prompts for updating an app. From a developer perspective, it means we will be able to iterate a lot quicker. We don’t need to wait for app store approvals anymore, and we can deploy at our own leisure.

Another advantage that a progressive web app has over a native mobile app is that it is linkable, hence it is easier to share and, probably even more importantly, can be indexed by search engines. This makes discoverability of the app a lot better.

Nordic.js 2016 • Jeremy Keith - Resilience: Tried and tested approaches - YouTube

I’m just back from a little mini 3-conference tour of Europe where I was delivering my talk on resilience. The first stop was Stockholm for Nordic.js and the video is already online.

What, Exactly, Makes Something A Progressive Web App? | Infrequently Noted

Alex runs through the features that a progressive web app must have, should have, and would be nice to have.

In general, installability criteria are tightening. Today’s Good-To-Haves may become part of tomorrow’s baseline. The opposite is unlikely because at least one major browser has made a strong commitment to tightening up the rules for installability.

Right now, this is in the nice-to-have category:

Mobile-friendly, not mobile-only.

Personally, I’d put that in the must-have category, and not just for progressive web apps.

Anyway, read on for some advice on testing and tooling when it comes to evaluating progressive web apps.

How Google And Others Are Plotting The Revenge Of The Web App | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

It’s always, um …”interesting” when a mainstream publication covers a topic from the web’s bikeshed. In this case, it’s progressive web apps, and—apart from the sensationalist headline—it’s actually not that bad at all.

The Building Blocks Of Progressive Web Apps – Smashing Magazine

This is a really good overview of progressive web apps:

An ideal web app is a web page that has the best aspects of both the web and native apps. It should be fast and quick to interact with, fit the device’s viewport, remain usable offline and be able to have an icon on the home screen.

At the same time, it must not sacrifice the things that make the web great, such as the ability to link deep into the app and to use URLs to enable sharing of content. Like the web, it should work well across platforms and not focus solely on mobile. It should behave just as well on a desktop computer as in other form factors, lest we risk having another era of unresponsive m.example.com websites.

Aria-Controls is Poop | HeydonWorks

I wrote a while back about how I switched from using a button to using a link for progressive disclosure patterns. That looks like it was a good move—if I use a button, I’d need to use aria-controls and, as Heydon outlines here, the screen reader support is pants.

The Long, Remarkable History of the GIF

The history of the GIF—a tale of licensing, compression, and standards.

How we made the RioRun progressive web app | Info | The Guardian

The devs at The Guardian walk through the process of building a progressive web app for the Olympics. There were some gotchas with the life cycle of service workers, but the pay-off was worth it:

Once you get there though, it’s quite magical when you load the page on a phone, switch it to airplane mode, reload, and continue using the app as though nothing was wrong.

10K Apart

The 10K competition—spiritual successor to Stewart Butterfield’s 5K.org—is back. This time there’s no escape clause with web fonts or jQuery. You can lazy-load in more content after the initial 10K payload …but whatever you’re building needs to be usable in that first 10K.

Give it a go. There’s nothing like having a constraint to really get the creative juices flowing.

Progressive Enhancement for JavaScript App Developers | De Voorhoede

Build JS apps responsibly - cover your basics, render strategically and enhance into true apps.

React Isomorphic Demo

It is possible to use React without relying completely on client-side JavaScript to render all your content—though it’s certainly not the default way most tutorials teach React. This ongoing tutorial aims to redress that imbalance.

Besides the main benefit of server rendering giving faster page loads, it also enables large amounts of the site to run without JavaScript. There are many reasons why you would want this, but my personal reasons are that it allows you to completely drop support JavaScript in older browsers, but still have the site function.

CSS only scroll indicator

This is witchcraft. I’ve been deconstructing the CSS to figure out how this works and it’s really clever.

(Hint: try commenting out some of the CSS and see what happens.)

Web Components and progressive enhancement - Adam Onishi

Adam and I share the same hopes and frustrations with web components. They can be written in a resilient, layered way that allows for progressive enhancement, but just about every example out there demonstrates a “my way or the highway” approach to using them.

We were chatting about this in the Design Systems slack channel, and it helped clarify some of my thoughts. I’ll try to poop out a blog post about this soon.

Web Design in 4 minutes

This is a wonderful way of progressively explaining the layered approach to building for the web that Charlotte was teaching in her Codebar workshop.

shawnbot/custom-elements: All about HTML Custom Elements

A good introduction to custom elements, one piece of the web components stack.

That said, when using custom elements—or anything involving JavaScript, for that matter—you should always design experiences for progressive enhancement, and plan for the possibility that JavaScript isn’t enabled or available.

Hmmm …that’s kind of hard when JavaScript is required to make custom elements work at all.

Adapting to Input · An A List Apart Article

Jason breaks down the myths of inputs being tied to device form factors. Instead, given the inherent uncertainty around input, the only sensible approach is progressive enhancement.

Now is the time to experiment with new forms of web input. The key is to build a baseline input experience that works everywhere and then progressively enhance to take advantage of new capabilities of devices if they are available.

The best of Google I/O 2016 | Andrew Betts

Andrew picks out his favourite bits from this year’s Google I/O, covering web payments, CSS containment, and—of course—Service Workers and progressive web apps, although he does note (and I concur):

I wish Google would focus as much attention on ‘normal’ sites that perform navigations as they do on so called ‘app-shell’ (which is just a new name for single-page apps, as far as I can tell), but then many people will be building SPAs and these recipes will make those apps fly. In news publishing we seem to flip flop between traditional page navigations and SPAs, but I’ve never found a SPA news site (or a native app) that I really like more than a normal website. Maybe a really good progressive web app will change that. But I’m not convinced.

Still, as he says:

All this really just underscores how flexible ServiceWorker is and that with it we can disagree on what the right solution is, but we can all get what we want anyway.

The Business Case for Progressive Web Apps - Cloud Four

Jason looks at the business reasons for and against building progressive web apps. In short, there’s everything to gain and nothing to lose.

Seriously, why would you not add a Service Worker and a manifest file to your site? (assuming you’re already on HTTPS)

The Progress of Web Apps | Microsoft Edge Dev Blog

The roadmap for progressive web apps from Microsoft; not just their support plans, but also some ideas for distribution.

EmberCamp London Keynote 2016 // Speaker Deck

I really, really like what Ember is aiming for here:

First, we deliver the raw content, ensuring those on slow connections or without JavaScript get they’re after as soon as possible. Next, we load the minimum set of JavaScript needed to interactivity for that page, keeping transfer time and parsing time low. Once the user has an interactive page, we can start preemptively loading other parts of the application, including frequently-accessed data.

That’s how you get the holy grail of resilience and performance:

Subsequent visits and interactions are therefore nearly instantaneous, because they don’t rely on the network.

I sincerely hope other frameworks are paying attention to this layered approach.

Oh, and I also like this observation:

There’s an age-old argument about the difference between “web pages” and “web apps”. In reality, there’s a continuum between the two.

Completely CSS: Progressively Collapsing Navigation | Kenan Yusuf

One way of implementing the growing/shrinking navigation pattern—an alternative to just shoving everything behind a hamburger icon.

Progressive Web Apps Dev Summit | hiddedevries.nl

Hidde’s write-up of the Progressive Web App Dev Summit:

It was exciting to hear about the technologies, and to see that a lot of them already work on a great deal of platforms. Most of the major browser vendors expressed how much they liked the idea, so it is realistic to say support will increase in the short term. This, and the fact that all PWA techniques can be regarded as a ‘progressive enhancement’ (with some leniency as to what that term means), entails that we can build Progressive Web Apps today.

Hopefully, we will do so responsibly. Native apps really only work on their particular platforms. PWAs, in theory, can be built to work universally. For everyone with a web enabled device. This is awesome! Major browser vendors are behind the idea, and I think as developers we should be, too.

Apps are dying by Cameron Moll

Cameron looks back on his 2007 Mobile Web Design book:

I don’t anticipate native apps will die off anytime soon. But I’m warming to the idea that they may be less relevant to the future of the web, and I reaffirm that “a browser will be — or should be — sufficient for interacting with web content.”

Progressive web apps are poised to be remarkably relevant to the future of the web. Let’s not screw it up.

Dev.Opera — Making progressive web apps even better: ambient badging and “pop into browser”

Andreas demoed these ideas yesterday. Proper ambient badging and a way of getting at URLs even if a progressive web app is running in fullscreen or standalone mode. Great stuff!

ManifeStation - Automagically create your Web App Manifest

If you’re going to make a manifest file for an existing site, start with this very handy tool. You give it the URL of your site and it then parses the content for existing metadata to create a best first stab at a manifest JSON file.

Resilience Poster Talk from Jeremy Keith by jessman5Stuff on Etsy

This beautiful poster could be the ideal decoration for your home or office.

You can download the original size (DIN A3) and print it to hang it on the walls in your office or wherever you want.

Enhancing Optimistically | Filament Group, Inc., Boston, MA

I love the thinking that Scott puts into all aspects of building on the web. Here, he outlines a really robust approach to cutting the mustard for progressive enhancement.

The web is catching up on mobile

A good impartial overview of progressive web apps, as described at the most recent Google I/O. This is very telling:

At the start I found the term a bit confusing as some PWA examples are single page applications (SPA) controlled by JavaScript. These apps are not strictly using progressive enhancement where JavaScript is added on top to enhance the experience.

The term also begs the question; what is the difference between websites and apps? It seems many of the new capabilities fit well for any dynamic website, not just apps.

Anyhow. It’s good to have an umbrella term to talk about these things.

Progressive Web App Dev Summit 2016 | Home

Google have asked me to moderate a panel on the second day of this event in Amsterdam dedicated to progressive web apps. Very brave of them, considering some of my recent posts.

Progressive web apps – let’s not repeat the errors from the beginning of responsive web design | justmarkup

Those who cannot remember the past are doomed to repeat it:

When people learned about responsive design, there were many wrong assumptions. The iPhone and early Android phones all had the same screen size (320x480px) and people thought it is a good idea to change the design based on these device-specific sizes.

We wouldn’t do that now, right? We wouldn’t attempt to create something that’s supposed to be a progressive web app, only to make it device-specific, right?

We are still at the beginning of learning about the best ways to build Progressive Web Apps. I hope it will make many more people aware of progressive enhancement. I hope that nobody makes the error again and concentrates on the device part.

as days pass by — Programmatic Progressiveness

Stuart’s ideas for Lighthouse sound a lot like the resilience validator tool that Scott mentioned recently.

This is our chance to help stamp out sites that don’t do things right, and help define that a progressive web app should actually be progressive.

If you have ideas on this, please file an issue.

PWA Discovery: You Ain’t Seen Nothin Yet | Infrequently Noted

Smart thinking from Alex on how browsers could better indicate that a website is a progressive web app (and would therefore benefit from being added to the home screen). Ambient badging, he calls it.

Wouldn’t it be great if there were a button in the URL bar that appeared whenever you landed on a PWA that you could always tap to save it to your homescreen? A button that showed up in the top-level UI only when on a PWA? Something that didn’t require digging through menus and guessing about “is this thing going to work well when launched from the homescreen?”

Progressively less progressive | Andrew Betts

I agree with everything Andrew says here. Progressive web apps are great, but as long as Google heap praise on mobile-only solutions (like the Washington Post doorslam) and also encourage separate AMP sites, they’re doing a great disservice to the web.

More features arrive regularly to make this “one web” even better and easier to maintain. Service worker, streams, app manifests, payment request, to name a few. But adding these features one at a time to large, mature applications like WaPo or FT or Nikkei is a slow and painstaking process. That’s why it’s taking us a long time for us to tick off all these new features, and why it seems like madness to try and build the entire app several times over.

However, by creating the concept of PWAs and marketing them as they do, Google is encouraging publishers to ‘start again’. And they’re doing exactly the same thing with AMP.

Going Offline With Progressive Web Apps

Dave turned Day Trip into a progressive web app.

Starting this week, Android users (~13% of our active user base) who use DayTrip more than once will eventually be asked if they want to install our web app to their Home Screen. That’s important real estate for a small startup like ourselves.

Progressive Enhancement and Modern JavaScript ― Caolan

I think JavaScript frameworks have been blinkered to the needs of many developers (most websites are not SPAs or run by Node, nor should they be) for too long. We need to find a way to apply the lessons of modern frameworks to the rest of the web - it would be sad if everyone had to run JavaScript on their server and good-old resilient HTML was considered only as a fallback.

Yet another blog about the state and future of Progressive Web App - The blog of Ada Rose Edwards

Bravo!

In the web developer community’s collective drive to be more App Like and compete with native apps we may lose or weaken some of the web’s strongest features and we need to consider carefully before we throw away urls or the entire browser chrome in an effort to look like and behave like the cool kids of native.

You can hear more of Ada’s thoughts on progressive web apps on a recent episode of JavaScript Air.

Not The Post I Wanted To Be Writing… – Infrequently Noted

Phew! Alex seems to have calmed down. He’s responding to my concerns about exposing URLs in progressive web apps, but thankfully without the absolutist rhetoric or insults. Progress!

DRY: Do Repeat Yourself - QuirksBlog

Y’know, I think PPK might be on to something here. It’s certainly true that developers have such an eversion to solving a problem twice that some users end up paying the cost (like in the examples of progressive enhancement here).

I will be pondering upon this.

turbolinks/turbolinks: Turbolinks makes navigating your web application faster

I really, really like the approach that this JavaScript library is taking in treating Ajax as a progressive enhancement:

Turbolinks intercepts all clicks on a href links to the same domain. When you click an eligible link, Turbolinks prevents the browser from following it. Instead, Turbolinks changes the browser’s URL using the History API, requests the new page using XMLHttpRequest, and then renders the HTML response.

During rendering, Turbolinks replaces the current body element outright and merges the contents of the head element. The JavaScript window and document objects, and the HTML html element, persist from one rendering to the next.

Here’s the mustard it’s cutting:

It depends on the HTML5 History API and Window.requestAnimationFrame. In unsupported browsers, Turbolinks gracefully degrades to standard navigation.

This approach matches my own mental model for building on the web—I might try playing around with this on some of my projects.

Progressive Web Apps and our regressive approach | Christian Heilmann

So remember when I was talking about “the ends justify the means” being used for unwise short-term decisions? Here’s a classic example. Chris thinks that Progressive Web Apps should be made mobile-only (at least to start with …something something something the future):

For now, PWAs need to be the solution for the next mobile users.

End users deserve to have an amazing, form-factor specific experience.

I couldn’t disagree more. End users deserve to have an amazing experience no matter the form-factor of their device.

Beyond Progressive Web Apps • cssence.com

Matthias Beitl takes a stab at trying to tackle the tricky UI problem of exposing the URLs of Progressive Web Apps. This stuff is hard.

Pakyow Web Framework

This looks like a really interesting server-side framework for Ruby developers. The documentation is nice and clear, and puts progressive enhancement at the heart of its approach.

No Really, For Everyone | Benjamin Listwon

A heartfelt call to web developers to consider the needs of the many and varied people trying to use what we build.

None of this is about Javascript. None of this is about CSS transforms or WebGL. None of this is about technology at all.

It is about making products that serve all users equally. It is about putting ourselves in others’ shoes. It is about trying to imagine the frustration and difficulty of using our products when the conditions aren’t what we’re used to. It is about being human.

Developing Dependency Awareness – Smashing Magazine

A typically superb article by Aaron. Here, he breaks down a resilient approach to building for the web by examining the multiple ways you could add a button to a page. There’s a larger lesson here too:

We don’t control where our web-based products go or how our users access them. All we can do is imagine as many less-than-perfect scenarios as possible and do our best to ensure our creations will continue to do what they’re supposed to do. One of the easiest ways to do that is to be aware of and limit our dependencies.

Building Web Apps for Everyone - O’Reilly Media

Here’s a fantastic and free little book by Adam Scott. It’s nice and short, covering progressive enhancement, universal JavaScript, accessibility, and inclusive forms.

Download it now and watch this space for more titles around building inclusive web apps, collaboration, and maintaining privacy and security.

Did I mention that it’s free?

Render 2016 - Jeremy Keith on Vimeo

Here’s another version of my talk Resilience—the same one I gave at Beyond Tellerrand—this time from the Render conference in Oxford.

Jeremy Keith on Vimeo

Here’s the video of the talk I just gave at the Beyond Tellerrand conference in Düsseldorf: Resilience.

Rebuilding the Perch UI - not your usual redesign

The Perch Control Panel is progressively enhanced. Almost all functionality of Perch is available even if you completely disable JavaScript, or if JavaScript fails to load.

what3words | Addressing the world

In this English language alternative to latitude and longitude coordinates, the Clearleft office is located at:

cross.rooms.quick

Reboot! » Mike Industries

Mike’s blog is back on the Indie Web.

As someone who designs things for a living, there is a certain amount of professional pride in creating one’s own presence on the internet. It’s kind of like if an architect didn’t design their own house.

An Event Apart News: The Contributions of Others: A Session with Jeremy Keith

Eric asked me some questions and I was only too happy to give some answers.

Progressive Web Apps have leapfrogged the native install model … but challenges remain

While many challenges remain, the good news is … it’s progressive. Developers can already see the benefits by sprinkling in these technologies to their existing websites and proceed to build on them as browsers and operating systems increase support.

RAFP: a proposal for performance measurements through requestAnimationFrame - QuirksBlog

Here’s an interesting proposal from ppk: use requestAnimationFrame to gauge how performant a browser in behaving and then enhance accordingly.

Introduction to Ember FastBoot by Tom Dale on Vimeo

I’m so happy that Ember is moving to a server-side rendering model. Not only that, but as Tom points out here, it’s crucial that the server-side rendering is the default and the client-side functionality than becomes an enhancement.

Web Manifest Validator

If you have a manifest.json file for your site, here’s a handy validator.

Progressive web apps: the long game

Remy sums up the psychological end goal of progressive apps (HTTPS + Service Worker + manifest JSON file) prompting an add to home screen action:

This high bar of entry will create a new mental model for our users.

If I add this app to my home screen, it will work when I open it.

It’s a shame that this charge to turbo-boast the perception of the web on mobile is a bit one-sided: I would love to see Apple follow Google’s lead here. But if Android succeed in their goal, then I think iOS will have to follow suit just to compete.

Bruce Lawson’s personal site  : One weird trick to get online — designers hate it!

I don’t care about Opera Mini (I’m not its Product Manager). In the same way, I don’t care about walking sticks, wheelchairs, mobility scooters or guide dogs. But I care deeply about people who use enabling technologies — and Opera Mini is an enabling technology. It allows people on feature phones, low-powered smartphones, people in low-bandwidth areas, people with very small data plans, people who are roaming (you?) connect to the web.

Web Progressions

This looks a good (free!) event in London all about the latest browser goodies, all wrapped in the “progressive apps” buzzword.

Alas, I’ll be making my way back from Indie Web Camp Düsseldorf the day this is on.

Introducing A11y Toggle

Here’s a bit of convergent evolution: Hugo’s script is similar to what I wrote about recently.

He also raises a point that Kevin mentioned:

I would like to investigate on the details and summary elements as they are basically a native implementation for content toggles.

For some reason details never got much browser love, even though it’s clearly paving a well-trodden cowpath.

Design is choice by Jaime Caballero

A lovely outlook on designing with progressive enhancement:

There will always be users coming from places you didn’t expect, using devices you didn’t test for.

Simon McManus - YouTube

Come for the videos of EnhanceConf. Stay for the skateboarding beagle.

An update (March 2016) on the current state & recommendations for JavaScript …

Making web apps? Care about SEO? Here’s Google’s advice:

Use feature detection & progressive enhancement techniques to make your content available to all users.

Maybe we could tone down the JavaScript / fuzzy notepad

Accept that sometimes, or for some people, your JavaScript will not work. Put some thought into what that means. Err on the side of basing your work on existing HTML mechanisms whenever you can.

If you’re going to override or reimplement something that already exists, do some research on what the existing thing does first. You cannot possibly craft a good replacement without understanding the original.

Remember that for all the power the web affords you, the control is still ultimately in end user’s hands.

Embracing simplicity by Adam Silver

The full text of Adam’s excellent talk at EnhanceConf.

EnhanceConf - Stefan Tilkov - How to embrace the browser - YouTube

The videos from EnhanceConf are started to go up already. Stefan’s talk really struck me—all the talks were great but this one had the most unexpected insight for me. It really clarifies a lot of ideas that I’ve been trying to articulate, but which Stefan crystalises by taking the long-zoom view.

Manifesto of the Committee to Abolish Outer Space – The New Inquiry

Fear and loathing in Houston.

  1. Humanity will never colonize Mars, never build moon bases, never rearrange the asteroids, never build a sphere around the sun.
  2. There will never be faster-than-light travel. We will not roam across the galaxy. We will not escape our star.
  3. Life is probably an entirely unexceptional phenomenon; the universe probably teems with it. We will never make contact. We will never fuck green-skinned alien babes.
  4. The human race will live and die on this rock, and after we are gone something else will take our place. Maybe it already has, without our even noticing.
  5. All this is good. This is a good thing.

Progressive Web Apps London

On the same day—and in the same city—as that Mobile @Scale event that Facebook are hosting, Google are hosting their own free event all about Progressive Web Apps, the buzziest of buzzwords.

Shame I can’t be in two places at once.

The New Web Typography › Robin Rendle

A wonderfully thoughtful piece on typography, Jan Tschichold and the web. This really resonated with me:

It’s only been over the past year or so in which I’ve recognised myself as a ‘Web designer’ with a capital W, as I now believe that something happens to information and technology, and even typography itself, when people pass through these interconnected networks and interact with hypertext.

It’s for these reasons that I don’t believe in “digital design” or “designing for screens” and it’s why I’m often attracted to one particular side of this spectrum.

Robin proposes three “principles, suggestions, outlines, or rather things-that-I-ought-to-be nervous-about when setting text on the web”:

  1. We must prioritise the text over the font, or semantics over style.
  2. We ought to use and/or make tools that reveal the consequences of typographic decisions.
  3. We should acknowledge that web typography is only as strong as its weakest point.

There’s an in-depth look at applying progressive enhancement to web type, and every single link in the resources section at the end is worth investigating.

Oh, and of course it’s beautifully typeset.

Keeping a smart home guest-friendly — Sensors and sensibility

In web development, we have this concept of progressive enhancement, which means that you start by building websites with the very most basic blocks - HTML elements. Then you enhance those basic elements with CSS to make them look better, then you add JavaScript to make them whizzy - the benefit being that if the JS or the CSS fail to load, you’ve still go the basic usable blocks underneath. I’m following this same principle in the house.

Related: this great chat between Jen Simmons and Stephanie Rieger.

Progressive Enhancement Gets a Conference, From the Notebook of Aaron Gustafson

Aaron interviews Simon who’s organising the upcoming EnhanceConf which is going to be ruddy good.

Ethical Web Development

I really, really like these principles. Time to add them to the list.

A simple HTML5 Progress bar | Charlotte Jackson, Front-end developer

I love this little markup pattern: simple, accessible and elegant …with some quirky CSS gotchas around styling non-standard prefixed pseudo-elements. They came from the Shadow DOM …dun dun DUN!

The accessibility stack: making a better layer cake » Simply Accessible

A great description of a solid architectural approach to building on the web (and not just for accessibility either).

EnhanceConf line-up by Simon McManus

This is shaping up to be a great affordable one-day event in London on March 4th. The format will be similar to Responsive Day Out.

I suggest you grab a ticket.

Words of Wisdom from @adactio - Matt Radford

A larger screen is now a progressive enhancement. Hell, with things like Siri and Google Now and Amazon’s Echo, we’re getting to the point where even a screen is an enhancement.

JavaScript web apps considered valuable · molily

A response to a rant I linked to recently.

The solution for bad JavaScript web apps is not to abandon them altogether, but to make better ones.

I couldn’t agree more. The tools have evolved and we now have frameworks and practices that allow us to render from the server and use the same code to render on the client, progressively enhancing from a solid robust base.

JavaScript is the best technology to build excellent interactivity in the browser. Still, the most important skill of a client-side JavaScript developer is to know when not to solve a problem with client-side JavaScript. It’s always more robust to solve a problem further down in the stack.

The problem is that I don’t see a willingness from developers to embrace this way of thinking. Instead I see it dismissed as being unrealistic or more expensive.

Still, it always takes time for behaviour to change so maybe things will only get better. I certainly hope so.

A Flag for No Nations | booktwo.org

This a magnificent piece of writing from James …all about pieces of metal fabric.

A single technology – the vacuum-deposition of metal vapour onto a thin film substrate – makes its consecutive and multiple appearances at times of stress and trial: at the dawn of the space age, in orbit and on other planets, at the scene of athletic feats of endurance, in defence and offence in the mountains of the Hindu Kush, on the beaches of the European archipelago. These are moments of hope as well as failure; moments when, properly utilised, technological progress enables us to achieve something which was beyond our capabilities before. And yet: we are still pulling bodies from the water wrapped in material which was meant to send us into space.

Don’t tell me what my browser can’t do! by Christian Heilmann

A great piece by Christian on taking a responsible, customer-focused approach to building on the web.

You don’t have to support old browsers and terrible setups. But you are not allowed to block them out. It is a simple matter of giving a usable interface to end users. A button that does nothing when you click it is not a good experience. Test if the functionality is available, then create or show the button.

Yes, this is an argument for progressive enhancement. No, that does not mean you can’t use JavaScript.

You can absolutely expect JavaScript to be available on your end users computers in 2016. At the same time it is painfully naive to expect it to work under all circumstances.

Why I hate your Single Page App by Stefan Tilkov

A linkbaity title for a ranty post. But it’s justified.

My point is that from an architectural perspective, most single page apps are the result of making the wrong choices and missing important opportunities.

The web is okay

It’s okay to feel stress in response to this rapid development. It’s natural. I hate change, I hate it so so much. I like things to be consistent and for it to have it’s own place. If it doesn’t, I get stressed and my obsessive compulsive tendencies run riot in a desperate attempt to preserve order. This both benefits and hinders my work.

Chimes very nicely with the latest episode of Ctrl+Click Cast.

VerbalExpressions/JSVerbalExpressions

Regular expressions are my kryptonite so I can definitely imagine using the PHP port of this plain English syntax.

Reimagining Single-Page Applications With Progressive Enhancement – Smashing Magazine

Some really great thinking here by Heydon on how to make single page apps but using HTML for the views instead of relying on client-side JavaScript for the rendering. He explains the code he’s using, but what really matters here isn’t the specific solution; it’s the approach. Smart!

The Problem with Progressive Enhancement by Alex Lande

I think that “Do we want to support users without JS?” is the wrong question. Progressive enhancement has benefits that reach far beyond that user group.

Specifically:

  1. Performance—”Progressively enhanced behaviors like using links that point to real URLs, or server-side form submission handling, allow users to perform important actions before JavaScript loads.”
  2. Resilience—”If users can perform critical tasks when your JS breaks, it’s a minor inconvenience instead of a show stopper.”
  3. Business, Business, Business.

Photo upload and progressive enhancement for FixMyStreet / mySociety

Matthew describes a very nice bit of progressive enhancement for drag’n’drop file uploads (similar to the CSS Tricks article I linked to recently).

It uses the Dropzone JS which looks like it aligns nicely with the progressive enhancement approach.

What Progressive Web Apps Mean for the Web - Telerik Developer Network

A hands-on look at building a progressive web app with Service Workers, manifest files, HTTPS, and all that good stuff. This is nice and balanced, extolling the virtues but also warning about the potential difficulties in implementing this stuff.

One nitpick though: there’s talk of graceful degradation, and while I get that that’s the outcome, I think it’s better to think in terms of progressive enhancement, which is the approach.

Putting My Patterns through Their Paces ◆ 24 ways

Ethan demonstrates progressive enhancement at the pattern level using flexbox.

I’ve found that thinking about my design as existing in broad experience tiers – in layers – is one of the best ways of designing for the modern web.

Progressive Enhancement—Ain’t Nobody Got Time for that | GlückPress

Two sides of a debate on progressive enhancement…

Andrey “Rarst” Savchenko wrote Progressive enhancement — JS sites that work:

If your content website breaks down from JavaScript issue — it is broken.

Joe Hoyle disagrees:

Unlike Rarst, I don’t value progressive enhancement very highly and don’t agree it’s a fundamental principle of the web that should be universally employed. Quite frankly, I don’t care about not supporting JavaScript, and neither does virtually anyone else. It’s not that it doesn’t have any value, or utility - but in a world where we don’t have unlimited resources and time, one has to prioritise what we’ll support and not support.

Caspar acknowledges this:

I don’t have any problem buying into pragmatism as the main and often pressing reason for not investing into a no-JS fallback. The idealistic nature of a design directive like progressive enhancement is very clear to me, and so are typical restrictions in client projects (budgets, deadlines, processes of decision making).

But concludes that by itself that’s not enough reason to ditch such a fundamental technique for building a universal, accessible web:

Ain’t nobody got time for progressive enhancement always, maybe. But entirely ditching principle as a compass for resilient decision making won’t do.

See also: Mike Little’s thoughts on progressive enhancement and accessibility.

The web will always be a moving target : Eclectic Dreams

Caution:

It would be convenient to think that because we live in a world where people’s browsers are regularly updating, that we live in a world where the web is in a reliable state.

Reminder:

The web is a continually moving target. It probably changed in the time it took me to write this. If you work with web stuff you need to embrace this fact. It will be the only constant in your career.

Do not panic:

On the web progressive enhancement is and will always be, the methodology of choice. It makes your site robust to the shifting sands of the web front end.

Universal React ◆ 24 ways

I have no hands-on experience with React, but this tutorial by Jack Franklin looks like a great place to start. Before the tutorial begins he succinctly and clearly outlines the perfect architecture for building on the web today:

  • The user visits www.yoursite.com and the server executes your JavaScript to generate the HTML it needs to render the page.
  • In the background, the client-side JavaScript is executed and takes over the duty of rendering the page.
  • The next time a user clicks, rather than being sent to the server, the client-side app is in control.
  • If the user doesn’t have JavaScript enabled, each click on a link goes to the server and they get the server-rendered content again.

YES!!!

Y’know, I had a chance to chat briefly with Jack at the Edge conference in London and I congratulated him on the launch of a Go Cardless site that used exactly this technique. He told me that the decision to flip the switch and make it act as a single page app came right at the end of the project. I think that points to a crucial mindset that’s reiterated here:

Now we’ll build the React application entirely on the server, before adding the client-side JavaScript right at the end.

Progressive enhancement needs better advocacy • Zetafleet

A rousing call to arms for progressive enhancement. I agree with the sentiment, but I’m less comfortable making assumptions about the reasons why developers don’t use progressive enhancement:

However, what’s actually happening is that “universal access to content” is being subversively replaced with “universal access for a limited subset of users that I care about”.

Honestly, I think that plenty of developers just aren’t thinking about it—especially if they’re relying on a particular tool or framework to save them time and effort (which is not a crime). So that’s why I agree with the title of this piece: let’s talk about this more; let’s make sure developers understand what they’re doing when they make JavaScript a requirement for basic functionality.

I particularly like the point in here about content blockers like NoScript:

In fact, it’s probably more likely that a user will try browsing the Web today without scripting than at any other time since the 1990s.

The System of the World Wide Web

A fascinating ten-year old essay looking at the early days of the web and how it conquered FTP and Gopher.

And though glitz, politics, hard work, and competitors’ mistakes all played a role in the success of the web, there are also aspects of the architecture that ensured the web would catch on. I think the web won because of the URI.

URIs are everywhere, and what’s vaguely funny now is the idea that they’re something special. But they’re very special: URI management is the fundamental consideration behind the design of web sites, web applications, and web services. Tim Berners-Lee originally intended URIs to be invisible, but they’re too useful for that.

Drag and Drop File Uploading | CSS-Tricks

This is a terrific example of progressive enhancement in action: going from a simple file input to a lovely interactive drag’n’drop interface.

The code uses jQuery but it could be easily adapted to vanilla JavaScript, and anyway, it’s not so much the code that matters, it’s the approach.

Blocked! - O’Reilly Radar

Following on from that Wired article I linked to about disabling JavaScript, Simon St. Laurent brings in another factor—content blockers on iOS:

Apple offers its users the power to turn off much of the Web: fonts, styles, scripts, and more.

He rightly points out that the answer to building a robust, resilient web has been here all along:

Turning off web fonts, CSS, and images will frustrate designers and limit user interface possibilities, but turning off JavaScript might mean that we have to reconsider the architecture of our applications. Without JavaScript, the Web returns to its foundations of HTTP requests returning pages, with links and form submissions as the backbone of application structure.

Bruce Lawson’s personal site  : Progressive Web Apps: ready for primetime

Bruce gives a great run-down of what’s involved in creating one of those new-fangled progressive apps that everyone at Google and Opera (and soon, Mozilla) are talking about: a secure connection, a service worker, and a manifest file.

Crucially, in browsers that don’t support it, you have a normal website. It’s perfect progressive enhancement.

Funnily enough, this here website—adactio.com—is technically a progressive app now.

At their simplest, Progressive Web Apps are application-like things hosted on your web server. If you’re as old as me, you might call them “web sites”

Instant Loading Web Apps With An Application Shell Architecture | Web Updates - Google Developers

Outlining the architectural thinking required to create what the Google devrel folks are calling progressive apps.

Browsers without service worker support should always be served a fall-back experience. In our demo, we fall back to basic static server-side rendering…

Yay!

…but this is only one of many options.

Hmmm. In my opinion, sending usable HTML on first request isn’t an implementation detail—it’s crucial. But on the whole, this approach is very sensible indeed.

Google+ | Google Web Showcase - Google Developers

Paul gives the lowdown on the Google+ responsive relaunch. They set themselves this performance budget:

  • 60K of HTML,
  • 60K of CSS,
  • 60K of JavaScript,
  • 60 frames per second animations, and
  • 0.6 seconds latency.

And this bit is crucial:

One of our major rules was that all our pages needed to be both server-side and client-side rendered. With server-side rendering we make sure that the user can begin reading as soon as the HTML is loaded, and no JavaScript needs to run in order to update the contents of the page.

Best viewed with - Velocity Amsterdam 2015 // Speaker Deck

Are we doomed to see history repeat itself? With the amount of client-side MVC frameworks and the upcoming implementation of the ES6 syntax, will we soon be seeing a repeat of the “browser wars.” Will more websites only work in a select number of browsers with the capabilities to run their code?

Delivering Responsibly

The full transcript of Scott’s excellent presentation on performance and progressive enhancement.

EnhanceConf — Call For Proposals

There’s going to be a conference about progressive enhancement. It’ll happen in London in March of next year. You should speak at it.

You’ve got until December 20th to submit your proposal. What have you got to lose?

Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Deprecating our AJAX crawling scheme

It’s official: hash bang URLs are an anti-pattern, and if you want your content indexed by Google, use progressive enhancement:

Since the assumptions for our 2009 proposal are no longer valid, we recommend following the principles of progressive enhancement.

Jeremy Keith - Responsive Field Day 2015 - YouTube

Here’s the 20 minute talk I gave at the inaugural Responsive Field Day in Portland.

Miranj: Collateral Damage

Websites should not come with minimum software requirements.

An Event Apart News: Enhance! by Jeremy Keith—An Event Apart video

Here’s the video of the talk I gave at An Event Apart last year.

Guess what it’s about. Go on, guess!

No! It’s about progressive enha… oh.

More Proof We Don’t Control Our Web Pages, From the Notebook of Aaron Gustafson

Aaron collects some recent examples that demonstrate

  1. why we should use HTTPS and
  2. why we should use progressive enhancement.

The tough truth of reality by Chris Taylor

Progressive enhancement is not about “what if users turn JavaScript off” but “what happens when the page is loaded in sub-optimal circumstances”.

A fictional conversation about progressive enhancement

So a web app is defined as a system that requires the JavaScript excesses for it to work. And the argument for the JavaScript excesses is that we need it to build web apps. That sounds a teeny bit circular to me.

Jeremy Keith – Enhance! – Beyond Tellerrand Düsseldorf 2015 on Vimeo

The video of my talk at this year’s Beyond Tellerrand. I was pleased with how this went, except for the bit 16 minutes in when I suddenly lost the ability to speak.

Making Charts with CSS | CSS-Tricks

What a lovely bit of progressive enhancement—styling data tables to display as charts.

Cameron’s World

A wonderful collection of treasures excavated from GeoCities. Explore, enjoy, and remember what a crime it is that Yahoo wiped out so much creativity and expression.

Clearleft Letterpress Day | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

This was a fun way to spend the day—getting my hands dirty with ink and type.

Wood type composited and ready to set

Edge Conference 2015 - 5 Progressive Enhancement - YouTube

Here’s the video of the panel I participated in at Edge conference, expertly moderated by Lyza.

Thanks to the video editing, you can’t see the face I’m making when the guy from Facebook talks about user-agent sniffing as a totally cool and reliable way of working.

Designing with Progressive Enhancement — sixtwothree.org

The full text of Jason’s great talk at this year’s CSS Summit. It’s a great read, clearing up many of the misunderstandings around progressive enhancement and showing some practical examples of progressive enhancement working at each level of the web’s technology stack

It’s time to progress

Many believe we should leave the term “progressive enhancement” behind and start anew, but why not educate developers, clients and stakeholders and change many of the misconceptions surrounding it? Changing the name won’t change anything unless we address the real fundamental problems we have when describing the underlying concepts.

Why availability matters

A superb illustration of why playing the numbers game and dismissing even a small percentage of your potential audience could be disastrous.

It’s not 1% of people who always can’t see your site and 99% of people who always can. It’s 1% of visits. Almost all the people who don’t get your site correctly actually should have been able to. They don’t have JavaScript turned off. They’re not browsing on a WAP phone over a 2g connection from a shanty town. They’re you, in a cellar bar or a hotel room or waiting for the phone network to wake back up.

Thriving in Unpredictability - TimKadlec.com

This is the way to approach building for the web:

I want to make as few of those assumptions as possible. Because every assumption I make introduces fragility. Every assumption introduces another way that my site can break.

It’s progressive enhancement, but like Stuart, Tim is no longer planning to use that term.

as days pass by — Availability

Stuart writes up his thoughts on progressive enhancement following the great discussions at Edge Conf:

So I’m not going to be talking about progressive enhancement any more. I’m going to be talking about availability. About reach. About my web apps being for everyone even when the universe tries to stop it.

Progressive Apps: Escaping Tabs Without Losing Our Soul – Infrequently Noted

I really like Alex’s framing of best-of-breed progressively enhanced websites as “progressive apps” (although Bruce has some other ideas about the naming).

It’s a shame that the add-to-homescreen part isn’t standardised yet though.

Interface Experience Maps, From the Notebook of Aaron Gustafson

This sounds like it could be a very useful tool to introduce early in projects to get a shared understanding of progressive enhancement.

Dev.Opera — Making websites that work well on Opera Mini

Using Progressive Enhancement makes your site better for all users and enables the 275 million users of Opera Mini worldwide.

How we built the new gocardless.com — GoCardless Blog

A classic example of the holy grail of web performance and robustness—start with regular HTML sent from the server, enhance once it’s in the browser …if the browser is capable of it. In this case, it’s using JavaScript (React) on both the server and the browser.

A few quick links and thoughts on big web problems – Baldur Bjarnason

The system makes the website. Don’t blame the web developer, blame the organisation. A web developer embedded in a large system isn’t the one making the websites.

To make a progressively enhanced website that performs well and loads quickly even on slow connections, you need to first make an organisation that values those qualities over others.

Making a difference with performance by Jaime Caballero

This is a great blow-by-blow account of making an agency website perform better.

I love the side-by-side comparisons with other agencies, including Clearleft—the gauntlet has been thrown down!

The JavaScript-Dependency Backlash: Myth-Busting Progressive Enhancement

Progressive Enhancement remains the best option for solving web development issues such as wide-ranging browser support, maintenance and future-proofing your application.

The Many Faces of The Web

Instead of coming up with all these new tools and JavaScript frameworks, shouldn’t we try to emphasize the importance of learning the underlying fundamentals of the web? Teach those who are just stepping to this medium and starting their careers. By not making our stack more and more complex, but by telling about the best practices that should guide our work and the importance of basic things.

Killer page load performance – Async

This Async event at 68 Middle Street on June 11th looks like it’s going to good (and relevant to my interests).

It’s a Website | treevis

Apps:

Apps must run on specific platforms for specific devices. The app space, while large, isn’t universal.

Websites:

Websites can be viewed by anyone with a web browser.

And that doesn’t mean foregoing modern features:

A web browser must only understand HTML. Further, newer HTML (like HTML 5) is still supported because the browser is built to ignore HTML it doesn’t understand. As a result, my site can run on the oldest browsers all the way to the newest ones. Got Lynx? No problem. You’ll still be able to find matches nearby. Got the latest smartphone and plentiful data? It’ll work there, too, and take advantage of its features.

This is why progressive enhancement is so powerful.

My site will take advantage of newer technologies like geolocation and local storage. However, the service will not be dependent on them.

The Web (Browser) We Forgot - Kimberly Blessing (Think Brownstone) keynote - YouTube

This is a wonderful presentation by Kimberley at O’Reilly’s Fluent Conference, running through the history of the Line Mode Browser and the hack project we worked on at CERN to emulate it.

Everyone has JavaScript, right?

And that’s why you always use progressive enhancement!

screen shot from the TV series Arrested Development, showing a character whose catchphrase began 'And that's why...'

Progressive enhancement with handlers and enhancers | hiddedevries.nl

I like this declarative approach to associating JavaScript behaviours with HTML elements.

Keeping it simple: coding a carousel by Christian Heilmann

I like this nice straightforward approach. Instead of jumping into the complexities of the final interactive component, Chris starts with the basics and layers on the complexity one step at a time, thereby creating a more robust solution.

If I had one small change to suggest, maybe aria-label might work better than offscreen text for the controls …as documented by Heydon.

Let Links Be Links · An A List Apart Article

A superb piece by Ross Penman on the importance of being true to the spirit of the web.

Responsive News — We’ve made it.

The responsive BBC News site is live! Hurrah!

Here’s a look at the highs and lows of the site’s story, emphasising the importance of progressive enhancement and all that enables: feature detection (by “cutting the mustard”), conditional loading, and a mobile-first approach.

Zen and the Art of Wearable Markup

Jeffrey muses on progressive enhancement and future-friendliness.

js;dr = JavaScript required; Didn’t Read.

Because in 10 years nothing you built today that depends on JS for the content will be available, visible, or archived anywhere on the web.

Access Optional - TimKadlec.com

It will come as no surprise that I agree with every single word that Tim has written here.

BBC - Future Media Standards & Guidelines - Accessibility Guidelines v2.0

The minimum dependency for a web site should be an internet connection and the ability to parse HTML.

Progressive Enhancement is not about JavaScript availability. | Christian Heilmann

A great description of progressive enhancement.

Progressive enhancement in its basic form means not making assumptions

Making the case for Progressive Javascript — The Millstone — Medium

I think we can all agree that “isomorphic JavaScript” is a terrible name for a good idea. I quite like calling it “portable JavaScript”, but here’s a good case for calling it “progressive JavaScript.”

(Right up until the end when the author says “But mainly, it’s pretty safe to assume JavaScript will just work. Everywhere.” …which is precisely the kind of unfounded assumption that leads to the very problems that isomorphic/portable/progressive JavaScript can help fix.)

Better SVG Fallback and Art Direction With The <picture> Element

Smart thinking from Sara on providing a PNG fallback to browsers that don’t support SVG. Although, actually what I like about this solution is that it’s less about providing PNG as a fallback, and more about treating PNG as the baseline and SVG as the enhancement (an approach that the picture element is perfect for).

Progressive Enhancement and Data Visualizations | CSS-Tricks

A nice little pattern for generating a swish timeline in SVG from a plain ol’ definition list in HTML.

The Practical Case for Progressive Enhancement — sixtwothree.org

You know what? Just go and read everything that Jason writes, okay?

Ruddy good stuff.

Designing Experience Layers — sixtwothree.org

The engineering benefits of building websites with a layered approach.

Why, yes, I am talking about progressive enhancement yet again! Why do you ask?

You’re Missing the Point of Server-Side Rendered JavaScript Apps : Tom Dale

Tom doesn’t mention the phrase “progressive enhancement” once, but that’s okay—his post is still about progressive enhancement.

FastBoot is coming to Ember. That means server-side rendering. And that means progressive enhancement will become a possibility for Ember apps. Exciting!

Experience Development pt. 2: Progressive Enhancement with Jeremy Keith on Huffduffer

I really enjoyed chatting with the guys on the The Dirt podcast about progressive enhancement, but my goodness; it certainly sounds like I need to switch to decaf! Yappity-yapity-yap!

The Long Web by Jeremy Keith – An Event Apart Video on Vimeo

This is a talk I gave at An Event Apart about eighteen months ago, all about irish music, the web, long-term thinking, and yes, you guessed it—progressive enhancement.

Over It by Brad Frost

So keep things simple. Build to standards. Use progressive enhancement. Don’t try to send wheelbarrows full of JavaScript down the pipes unless you have to. Don’t make assumptions.

A Long Journey Reaches a Happy Conclusion: The Uncertain Web is Out In All Formats

Rob Larsen was published a book with O’Reilly called “The Uncertain Web: Web Development in a Changing Landscape”. I like it:

A refreshingly honest look at the chaotic, wonderful world of web development, with handy, practical advice for making future-friendly, backward-compatible websites.

As a new developer | Charlotte Spencer’s Blog

I’m not a new developer, but I can definitely relate to this. In fact, when I’ve spoken to any developer about this, it turns out that everyone feels overwhelmed by how much we’re expected to know. That’s not good. We should open up and talk about this more (like Charlotte is doing here).

Adaptive Web Design: Crafting Rich Experiences with Progressive Enhancement

You can now read Aaron’s excellent book online. I highly recommend reading the first chapter for one of the best descriptions of progressive enhancement that I’ve ever read.

Taunus

I like the thinking behind this isomorphic JavaScript library: start with the (Node.js) server and then take over on the client side after the initial page load.

Implement Server-Side Rendering for SEO · Issue #9938 · emberjs/ember.js

The motivation seems entirely misplaced to me (SEO? Really?) but never mind: the end result could be the holy grail of JavaScript MVC frameworks — code that runs on the server and the client. That would get you the reach and initial rendering speed of progressive enhancement, combined with the power of client-side application logic once the page has loaded.

Watch this space.

Responsive Enhancement ◆ 24 ways

My contribution to this year’s edition of the web’s best advent calendar.

Websites of Christmas Past, Present and Future ◆ 24 ways

A superb article by Josh on planning for progressive enhancement—clearly laid out and carefully explained.

You’re So Smart You Turned JavaScript into XHTML

Web developers overwhelmingly rejected the draconian error-handing of XML …and yet today, web developers are embracing that very same error-handling model by rendering everything with JavaScript.

I don’t think it’s the way of the web to have your site fail and show a blank screen because some third-party dependency doesn’t load, JavaScript is turned off or because your developer left a trailing comma in a JavaScript object and didn’t test in Internet Explorer.

Overwhelmed by Code · An A List Apart Blog Post

Focus on what you want to learn; not what you think you should learn.

There is a lot of pressure out there: to learn new things, to spend all your time coding, to be the super developer. I now believe that to be impossible and unhealthy. It means you aren’t living a balanced life and it also means that you’re living under constant stress and pressure.

Spotlight – a pure JavaScript application for GOV.UK Performance

Progressive enhancement with isomorphic JavaScript, as practiced at Government Digital Services.

Stop Breaking the Web

Angry, but true.

Don’t lock yourself into a comprehensive technology that may just die within the next few months and leave you stranded. With progressive enhancement you’ll never go wrong. Progressive enhancement means your code will always work, because you’ll always focus on providing a minimal experience first, and then adding features, functionality, and behavior on top of the content.

How URL started as UDI — a brief conversation with @timberners_lee @W3C #TPAC - Tantek

Tantek shares a fascinating history lesson from Tim Berners-Lee on how the IETF had him change his original nomenclature of UDI—Universal Document Identifier—to what we now use today: URL—Uniform Resource Locator.

Google Embraces Progressive Enhancement, from the notebook of Aaron Gustafson

I don’t tend to be a “magic pill” kind of believer, but I can honestly say that embracing progressive enhancement can radically change your business for the better. And I’m glad to see Google agrees with me.

Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Updating our technical Webmaster Guidelines

Google has updated its advice to people making websites, who might want to have those sites indexed by Google. There are two simple bits of advice: optimise for performance, and use progressive enhancement.

Just like modern browsers, our rendering engine might not support all of the technologies a page uses. Make sure your web design adheres to the principles of progressive enhancement as this helps our systems (and a wider range of browsers) see usable content and basic functionality when certain web design features are not yet supported.

Baby Steps - Petra Gregorová

Petra has always been the strong one. She was the best friend that Chloe could have possibly had. Little wonder then that Chloe’s death continues to hit her so hard.

I still can’t fully comprehend it all nor do I have any idea how to learn to move on. All I know is that ever since the day I found out, I’ve been on an emotional rollercoaster. I go from being in shock, to being sad and angry, or completely numb.

Petra is getting help now. That’s good. She’s also writing about what she has been going through. That’s brave. Very brave.

She is one of the best human beings I know.

Patty Toland — Design Consistency For The Responsive Web (Smashing Conference Freiburg 2014) on Vimeo

Patty’s excellent talk on responsive design and progressive enhancement. Stick around for question-and-answer session at the end, wherein I attempt to play hardball, but actually can’t conceal my admiration and the fact that I agree with every single word she said.

Progressive Enhancement Basics

Some thoughts on progressive enhancement, although I disagree with the characterisation of progressive enhancement as being the opposite choice to making “something flashy that pushes the web to it’s limits”—it’s entirely possible to make the flashiest, limit-pushing sites using progressive enhancement. After all…

it’s much more a mindset than a particular development technique.

Using ServiceWorker in Chrome today - JakeArchibald.com

It’s very early days for ServiceWorker, but Jake is on hand with documentation and instructions on its use. To be honest, most of this is over my head and I suspect it won’t really “click” until I try using it for myself.

Where it gets really interesting is in the comments. Stuart asks “What about progressive enhancement?” And Jake points out that because a ServiceWorker won’t be installed on a first visit, you pretty much have to treat it as an enhancement. In fact, you’d have to go out of your way to make it a requirement:

You could, of course, throw up a splash screen and wait for the ServiceWorker to install, creating a ServiceWorker-dependant experience. I will hunt those people down.

A Fundamental Disconnect, From the Notebook of Aaron Gustafson

I think Aaron is spot-on here. There’s a tendency to treat web development these days as just the same as any other kind of software development—which is, on the one hand, great because it shows just how far JavaScript and browsers have come …but on the other hand, that attitude is missing a crucial understanding of the fundamental nature of the web’s technology stack (that we should be treating HTML, CSS, and JavaScript as layers; not as one big ball of webby, timey-wimey stuff).

A device agnostic approach to inlining CSS | Blog | Decade City

I very much agree with Orde’s framing here: I don’t think it makes much sense to talk about “above the fold” CSS …but it makes a lot of sense to talk about critical CSS.

And, yeah, it’s another example of progressive enhancement.

Eric’s Archived Thoughts: Depression

I’m sad about Robin Williams. I was also a little bit angry with him. In much the same way, I was sad about and angry with Chloe Weil when news of her suicide reached me.

We Work in a World of Assumptions – The Pastry Box Project

Dan Donald gets to the heart of progressive enhancement:

Assumptions in themselves don’t have to be inherently bad but let’s recognise them for what they are. We know very little but that can hopefully enable us to be far more flexible and understanding in what we create.

Jeremy Keith on progressive enhancement - YouTube

Almost six minutes of me squinting in the sun and sharing my reckons while seagulls squawk in the background.

Using Encapsulation for Semantic Markup on CSS-Tricks

I really hope that this is the kind of usage we’ll see for web components: enhancements for the browsers that support them without a good ol’ fashioned fallback for older browsers.

Burying the URL - Allen Pike

Right now, this move to remove URLs from the interface of Chrome is just an experiment …but the fact that Google are even experimenting with it is very disturbing.

“Who? Me? No, I was never going to actually blow the web’s brains out—I just wanted to feel the heft of the weapon as I stroked it against the face of the web.”

Data attributes and progressive enhancement - Simply Accessible

Derek’s excellent advice on avoiding over-reliance on data attributes has this brilliant nugget of insight:

In the web front-end stack — HTML, CSS, JS, and ARIA — if you can solve a problem with a simpler solution lower in the stack, you should. It’s less fragile, more foolproof, and just works

Spotlight – a pure JavaScript application for GOV.UK Performance | Technology at GDS

A nice tale of progressive enhancement from gov.uk, talking about how they made their analytics dashboards (which are public, by the way) using JavaScript on the server and on the client.

I believe this is what the kids are calling isomorphic JavaScript.

Device-Agnostic by Trent Walton

A terrific post from Trent, touching on all the important facets of building for the web: universality, progressive enhancement, performance …great stuff!

The Pastry Box Project, Scott Jehl, Friday, 7 March 2014

Scott writes an absolutely spot-on skewering of the idea that progressive enhancement means you’re going to spend your time catering to older browsers. The opposite is true.

Progressive Enhancement frees us to focus on the costs of building features for modern browsers, without worrying much about leaving anyone out. With a strongly qualified codebase, older browser support comes nearly for free.

Platformed. — Unstoppable Robot Ninja

The importance of long-term thinking in web design. I love this description of the web:

a truly fluid, chaotic design medium serving millions of imperfect clients

Realizing One Web

A nice look at responsive design, progressive enhancement, and the principle of One Web.

Why is Progressive Enhancement so unpopular? — All in the head

Like Drew, I’ve noticed some real hostility to the idea of progressive enhancement recently. Like Drew, I don’t really understand where this attitude comes from. It’s not like progressive enhancement prevents you from doing anything you would do otherwise: it’s just another way of approaching the way you build for the web.

I hope I’m wrong, but I suspect that some developers are letting their tools dictate their principles—the tail wagging the dog (where the tail is Angular, Ember, etc.).

Why I’m turning JavaScript off by default

Another good ol’ rant from Tom. It’s a bit extreme but the underlying lamentation with the abandonment of progressive enhancement is well founded.

Building for the device agnostic web | Talks | Decade City

Some excellent practical advice on progressive enhancement.

Grade components, not browsers—Filament Group, Inc., Boston, MA

I really like Scott’s approach to defining what “support” means in terms of browsers—it makes a lot sense to break things down to the component level.

How many people are missing out on JavaScript enhancement? | Government Digital Service

The research behind GDS’s research that one in every 93 users of gov.uk is not receiving JavaScript …and it’s not because of JavaScript being disabled in their browser either. As ever, progressive enhancement is most useful in dealing with the situations you don’t anticipate.

Line Mode on Parallel Transport

A love letter to HTML, prompted by the line-mode browser hack event at CERN.

Progressive Enhancement: It’s About the Content

A cogent definition and spirited defence of progressive enhancement:

Progressive Enhancement is an extension of our shared values on the web and goes to the root of the web. I believe—and hope you agree—that the web is for everybody and should be accessible regardless of the device a user brings to the party.

Progressive Enhancement. Still Alive and Kickin’

Dan explains the reasoning behind his “Sigh, JavaScript” Tumblr blog, and provides an excellent example of progressive enhancement in the process.

Go, Dan, go!

Sigh, JavaScript

A great little Tumblr blog from Dan Mall: a collection of sites that don’t work at all if JavaScript isn’t available.

‘Sfunny, I was talking about just this kind of thing at An Event Apart today.

Reflections on An Event Apart DC 2013

Jason pulls together some of the themes that emerged at An Event Apart DC this week.

Being Practical - TimKadlec.com

Yet another timely reminder from Tim, prompted by the naysayers commenting on his previous excellent post on progressive enhancement, universal access, and the nature of the web.

Installable Webapps: Extend the Sandbox by Boris Smus

This a great proposal: well-researched and explained, it tackles the tricky subject of balancing security and access to native APIs.

Far too many ideas around installable websites focus on imitating native behaviour in a cargo-cult kind of way, whereas this acknowledges addressability (with URLs) as a killer feature of the web …a beautiful baby that we definitely don’t want to throw out with the bathwater.

Progressive enhancement is still important by Jake Archibald

Another great post on using progressive enhancement for JavaScript, this time by Jake. He does a great job of explaining the performance bottleneck that is created when you start doing everything on the client side.

Progressive Enhancement: Still Not Dead. - That Emil

A great post by Emil on the importance of using progressive enhancement for JavaScript — an increasingly unpopular position in today’s climate of client-side-only frameworks and libraries.

There’s something fundamental and robust about being able to request a URL and get back at least an HTML representation of the resource: human-readable, accessible, fault tolerant.

Enough with the JavaScript already!

A great set of slides from Nicholas, all about the disturbing trend in “modern” web apps to depend entirely on JavaScript as a single point of failure.

Leveraging Advanced Web Features in Responsive Design

A terrific case study in progressive enhancement: starting with a good ol’ form that works for everybody and then adding on features like Ajax, SVG, the History API …the sky’s the limit.

Progressive enhancement in the Government Service Design manual

A nice description of progressive enhancement by Norm, as applied at GDS.

Sensible jumps in responsive image file sizes

Some good thinking from Jason here. In a roundabout way, he’s saying that when it comes to responsive images—as with just about every other aspect of web development—the answer is …it depends.

Brett Jankord – Active development on Categorizr has come to an end

I think it’s a bit of a shame that Brett is canning his mobile-first device-detection library, but I totally understand (and agree with) his reasons.

There is a consensual hallucination in the market, that we can silo devices into set categories like mobile, tablet, and desktop, yet the reality is drawing these lines in the sand is not an easy task.

Implementing off-canvas navigation for a responsive website by David Bushell

This off-canvas demo is a great practical example of progressive enhancement from David. It’s also a lesson in why over-reliance on jQuery can sometimes be problematic.

The Panasonic Toughpad Press Conference - LOOK, ROBOT

Now this is what I call tech reporting.

The women leave the stage, wet computer in hand, and a new man takes the stage. He plays a schmaltzy video where Portuguese children teach adults to use Windows 8 accompanied by a hyperloud xylophone soundtrack that slices through my hangover like cheesewire though lukewarm gouda.

Twitter Engineering: Implementing pushState for twitter.com

A really nice explanation by Todd Kloots of Twitter’s use of progressive enhancement with Ajax and the HTML5 History API. There’s even a shout for Hijax in there.

The Vanilla Web Diet | Smashing Coding

I wholeheartedly agree with Christian’s diagnosis of the average web page: it’s overweight to the point of obesity. Fortunately Dr. Heilmann has some remedies.

isolani - Web Standards: Web App Mistakes: Condemned to repeat

Some great thoughts from Mike Davies about the strengths of the web, prompted by some of the more extreme comments made by James Pearce at Full Frontal last week.

I should point out that James was being deliberately provocative in order to foment thought and discussion and, judging from this blog post, he succeeded.

The Web’s independence from the hardware and software platform people use is a feature. It’s better than cross-platform frameworks which are constantly criticised for not producing exact native-feeling apps on the multitude of platforms they run on. The Web is above that pettiness.

Retina revolution

You’ve probably seen this already, but it’s really worth bearing in mind: when you’re scaling up JPGs for retina display you can safely reduce the image quality by quite a lot—to the point of getting the exact same file size as a higher quality image that’s half the size.

Jeremy Keith: Forbedringer gjennom responsiv design (Webdagene 2012) on Vimeo

This is the talk I gave at the Webdagene conference in Norway a few weeks back. I called it Responsive Enhancement but I think the Norwegian title translates as “Improvements Through Responsive Design.”

{ io: The Web Is Growing Up }

A lovely bit of hypertext.

JPEGmini - Your Photos on a Diet!

This looks like a really handy tool for reducing the file size of JPEGs without any perceptible loss of quality (in much the same way that ImageOptim works for PNGs)—available as a Mac app or an installable web service.

Twitter without Hashbangs

Remember when I linked to the story of Twitter’s recent redesign of their mobile site and I said it would be great to see it progressively enhanced up to the desktop version? Well, here’s a case study that does just that.

It’s time to stop blaming Internet Explorer | NCZOnline

Nicholas is inside my head! Get out of my head, Nicholas!

What makes the web beautiful is precisely that there are multiple browsers and, if you build things correctly, your sites and applications work in them all. They might not necessarily work exactly the same in them all, but they should still be able to work. There is absolutely nothing preventing you from using new features in your web applications, that’s what progressive enhancement is all about.

Build a smart mobile navigation without hacks | Tutorial | .net magazine

A really great markup and CSS pattern for “content first, navigation second” from Aaron.

How to Make Progress Bars Feel Faster to Users - UX Movement

A fascinating insight into the psychological implications of animated progress indicators.

The responsive images problem

A run-down of the various approaches to the responsive images problem, concluding that this is something that needs to be solved in the image format.

Responsive image format - blog

An idea for handling responsive images not with a new format, but with an existing one: progressive JPGs.

HTTP Compression use by Alexa Top 1000 | Zoompf

An in-depth analysis (graphs! data!) of how popular sites are using—or not using—compression.

Nicholas Zakas: Progressive Enhancement 2.0 - YouTube

A great talk by Nicholas on what progressive enhancement means today. There’s some good ammunition in here.

Content Parity | Brad Frost Web

Yet another great post from Brad:

Whenever I think of the concept of “One Web” and providing universal access to information on the web, I tend to break it down into something much simpler: give people what they ask for.

Excessive Enhancement - SXSW2012 // Speaker Deck

The slides from Phil’s excellent South by Southwest presentation on URLs, JavaScript, and progressive enhancement.

Browser Support? Forget It! – David Bushell – Web Design

A great post that discusses exactly what we mean when we talk about “supporting” different browsers.

Solve for X: Neal Stephenson on getting big stuff done - YouTube

Neal Stephenson speaks at Solve For X on the relative timidity of scientific (and science fictional) progress in our current time.

LukeW | Which One: Responsive Design, Device Experiences, or RESS?

Luke outlines three different solutions to delivering a site to multiple devices.

Progress Bar

A nice little bit of CSS for a page-loading animation. View source.

Travis Schmeisser: We Used To Build Forts on Vimeo

I loved this talk from Travis at New Adventures in Web Design, especially when he talked of the importance of Geocities and MySpace in democratising creative expression on the web.

We may have later bonded over that Ze Frank quote while in the toilet at the after-party …there may have even been hugs.

deCSS3 - a bookmarklet for graceful degradation.

This is really handy: a bookmarklet that will disable any CSS3 on a page so you can check that your fallbacks look okay.

A plea for progressive enhancement | Stephanie Rieger

Yes! Yes! Yes!!!

Progressive enhancement is the only sane approach to today’s massively divergent landscape of devices. It can’t be repeated often enough.

The Mobile Case for Progressive Enhancement | Brad Frost Web

A great, great reminder from Brad on the importance of progressive enhancement especially on mobile. There seems to be a real mindset amongst developers working on mobile sites that JavaScript is a requirement for building anything (and there’s a corresponding frustration with the wildly-varying levels of JavaScript support). It ain’t necessarily so!

LukeW | RESS: Responsive Design Server Side Components

Luke proposes a development approach that marries the best of responsive design with content negotiation. It makes a lot of sense. I like it.

Making the QR Code InfoDressShe Bytes - Exploring Digital Art, Technology, Design

I had a lovely conversation at the Update after-party with Georgie about the infographic dress she was wearing. It’s quite lovely.

Full Fucking Service, Reckless web development practices are encouraging idiots

I wholeheartedly agree with this summation of what professional web design and development entails.

Responsive images with ExpressionEngine — John Faulds

Here’s an approach to responsive images in the Expression Engine CMS …but I fundamentally disagree with the UA-sniffing required.

Mark Perkins  ★  All Marked Up

I agree 100% with Mark’s thoughts on what a Content Management System should and shouldn’t attempt to do.

I think that markup is too important to be left in the hands of the people who make content management systems. They all too often don’t care enough about it, and they can never know the context that you will be using it in, and so in my opinion they shouldn’t be trying to guess.

Bagchecking in the Command Line | Bagcheck

This is a fascinating take on progressive enhancement from Luke: for a service-based site, the equivalent of Content First is API first …literally a command line interface as a baseline.

txt2re: headache relief for programmers :: regular expression generator

I’m rubbish at regular expressions so this little tool might just save my skin someday.

Blush°° Bespoke

If you’d like to place your cup of tea on one of these lovely Fontdeck coasters, make sure you get a ticket for the Ampersand conference.

LONDON WEB - Sept 2010 - The Progressive Web - Andy Hume on Vimeo

A great presentation by Andy on the use of progressive enhancement at Clearleft.

New Statesman - Inside the Parliament Square kettle

A well-written account of a disgraceful situation. "We all go down together, horses looming above us, baton blows still coming down on our heads and shoulders. I am genuinely afraid that I might be about to die, and begin to thumb in my parents' mobile numbers on my phone to send them a message of love."

Stop! You are doing mobile wrong! | Metal Toad Media

An excellent summation of the responsive enhancement approach to web development.

This is a news website article about a scientific finding | Martin Robbins | Science | guardian.co.uk

A perfect parody lampooning the shallow and cowardly reporting of most so-called science stories by the press (I'm looking at you, BBC).

VaultPress — Apply for Beta

Another Huffduffer-style sign-up form, this time from the good folks at Automattic. Very cute.

Colosseo Letterpress Poster: Reimagining the Roman Coliseum with type

The most beautiful piece of letterpress art from Cameron thus far.

A.P. Cracks Down on Unpaid Use of Articles on Web - NYTimes.com

Foreheadslappingly stupid behaviour from the Associated Press.

Letterpress books, posters &c. - a set on Flickr

A lovely set of letterpress printing

Handbound letterpress Miniature Book

passive-aggressive (and just plain aggressive) notes — no, your mother doesn’t work here

Dear internet, Please keep throwing up sites like this because no, I don't have anything better to do with my time than scroll and click through the entire archive. Thank you.

Unobtrusify.com - Unobtrusive Javascript for Progressive Enhancement

A simple and powerful message, beautifully delivered (itself an example of unobtrusive JavaScript). Bravo, Phil Hawksworth!

Five CSS design browser differences I can live with | For A Beautiful Web

A great article by Malarkey wherein he lists five examples of progressive enrichment (as Dan is wont to call it) complete with side-by-side comparisons. Useful ammo, this.

Lustro - milkcarton

A cute little Mac app that exports your address book contacts in multiple formats ...including an HTML file with hCards!

Coding Horror: Please Give Us Your Email Password

An excellent rant by Jeff Atwood that explains just why the password anti-pattern is such an abhorrent practice: "How did we end up in a world where it's even remotely acceptable to ask for someone's email credentials?"

Yahoo! Address Book API - YDN

You can know use an API (with BBAuth) to get contact Yahoo account contact details. There really is no excuse now for still using the password anti-pattern.

Flickr: The Commons

Here's a fantastic collaboration with the Library of Congress. We are being asked to collectively tag historic pictures with no known copyright restrictions. Wonderful idea! Are you watching, British Library?

Christmas Jesus Dress Up!

Yours to cut out and keep.

Coverflow for People | FactoryCity

Chris mocks up an interface idea for Apple.

Automattic Acquires Gravatar « Gravatar Blog

This is good news. You can expect Gravatar service to get faster and better.

The London Evening Standard Headline Generator

Using photographs of actual headlines from the Evening Standard.

How Not To Get Noticed » SlideShare

Slides based on a usability analysis of Wordpress by some of the Happy Coggers.

» Undercover NBC Dateline reporter bolts from DEFCON 2007 | George Ou | ZDNet.com

Pwn3d! "Undercover reporter Michelle Madigan (Associate Producer of NBC Dateline) got a little more than she bargained for when she tried to sneak in to DEFCON 2007 with hidden cameras to get someone to confess to a felony."

Digital Web Magazine - Redesigning the ExpressionEngine Site

A really nice article by Jesse Bennett-Chamberlain detailing the process behind a site design.

Sillyness Spelled Wrong Intentionally » Lifestream, ala WordPress

Chris J. Davis has turned my life stream thingy into a plug-in for Wordpress. Nice!

API and RSS | irrepressible.info

Here's an API for accessing material that is censored in countries like China or Iran.You can use this API to republish that information on other sites, circumventing the censorship.

Saturday in the Park with Friends Painting Seurat on the Rock River - a photoset on Flickr

I think Seurat would have liked the fact that all these pictures are made up of pixels. Digital pointillism.

First example of Seurat Painting Photo

AJAX Activity Indicators

Want to indicate that something is happening on a web page, like... oh, I don't know... an Ajax request or something? Here's a cornucopia of animated progress indicators.

The Blog | Larisa Alexandrovna: MSM Plagiarism Strikes Again – AP Welcome to the Party | The Huffington Post

The Associated Press feels that blogs are good enough to steal from, but not good enough to credit.

BBC NEWS | Health | Sex 'cuts public speaking stress'

This is exactly the kind of timely research I need before next week's Ajax workshop.

news @ nature.com - Web users judge sites in the blink of an eye - Potential readers can make snap decisions in just 50 milliseconds.

People enjoy being right, so continuing to use a website that gave a good first impression helps to 'prove' to themselves that they made a good initial decision.

Designing With Web Standards, 2nd Edition

The book that changed how websites are designed is back in a smart new second edition.

Progressive Layout

Using JavaScript to serve up fixed or liquid layout based on browser width.